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Updated: 2 hours 52 min ago

Top 5: Linux on a Chromebook, building DNS servers, VoIP on Raspberry Pi, and more

Friday 14th of April 2017 01:55:00 PM

In this week's Top 5, we highlight putting Linux on a Chromebook, building your own DNS name servers, creating a VoIP (voice over IP) solution on a Raspberry Pi, comparing Python and Ruby for web development, and the top five programming languages for DevOps.

Top 5 articles of the week

5. Top 5 programming languages for DevOps


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5 projects for Raspberry Pi at home

Friday 14th of April 2017 07:03:00 AM

The Raspberry Pi computer can be used in all kinds of settings and for a variety of purposes. It obviously has a place in education for helping students with learning programming and maker skills in the classroom and the hackspace, and it has plenty of industrial applications in the workplace and in factories. I'm going to introduce five projects you might want to build in your own home.


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A guide to packing and preparing for a tech conference

Friday 14th of April 2017 07:02:00 AM

Spring has sprung in the Northern Hemisphere, meaning tech conference season is just around the corner. LinuxFest Northwest, OSCON, OpenStack Summit, Write the Docs, and PyCon US are just a few of the inspiring events happening in the next few weeks.


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A Linux-friendly DAC and headphone amplifier for listening to music

Friday 14th of April 2017 07:01:00 AM

This month I'm taking a bit of a break from my tagging journey to look at the latest gizmo in my house—a new DAC (digital-to-analog converter).


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8 new blog posts on how to encourage new contributors

Friday 14th of April 2017 07:00:00 AM

Help us collect community knowledge by blogging about the weekly community management theme. Blog posts are due the following Thursday after each new theme is announced.

 


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3 open source boilerplate web design templates

Thursday 13th of April 2017 07:03:00 AM

In the olden days, creating a website from scratch was easy.

With a basic understanding of HTML, and maybe a little CSS, you could put together a pretty functional web page with very little effort. Throw it onto your web server, and you were good to go.


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How to install and use MuseScore to create your own music

Thursday 13th of April 2017 07:02:00 AM

Last year in March, I wrote about MuseScore, a great open source application for musical notation. At the time, I was still using version 1, but since then I've upgraded to 2.0.3, and I've found that MuseScore version 2 provides a refined user interface and a healthy dose of polish to nearly every feature.

MuseScore is a stable, long-lived application, and that's a good thing because it means you can spend your time writing music instead of worrying about weekly updates pushing you toward the "cutting edge."


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Openness is key to working with Gen Z

Thursday 13th of April 2017 07:01:00 AM

Leaders and managers everywhere collectively groan with the thought of a new cohort to manage. Boomers and Gen Xers typically try to align the new kids on the block with Millennials—which would be a mistake. While Gen Z and Millennials have similarities, their motivators and influencers are vastly different. Each of the differences affects attraction, recruitment and retention of Gen Z talent.

Could open organizational models by the keys to seeing this generation excel in the workplace?

Let’s take a look.


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12 ways to study a new programming language

Thursday 13th of April 2017 07:00:00 AM

So, you've decided that you want to add a particular programming language to your repertoire. Now what?

In this article, I outline 12 suggestions for study techniques. Remember that everybody learns differently. Some of these techniques may work excellently for you, whereas others may not meet your needs at all. If you start to feel stuck with one strategy, try another and see where it gets you.


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Running Linux on your Chromebook with GalliumOS

Wednesday 12th of April 2017 07:02:00 AM

As a longtime user of Chromebooks, I know how useful and convenient those devices can be. They're light, the hardware is solid, and Chromebooks are excellent devices to carry while traveling or working on the go.

The main drawback of Chromebooks, though, is how tightly they're tied to Google's services. Over the last little while, I've been steadily de-Googlizing my life. One of the last big obstacles to doing that has been my Chromebook.


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How OpenStack releases get their names

Wednesday 12th of April 2017 07:01:00 AM

What's in a name?

Quite a bit, actually. Open source projects frequently struggle to find a name that's suitably memorable, descriptive, appropriate, and, above all else, does not find the project in accidental legal trouble.


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Getting started with Jekyll, a free and open source static site generator

Wednesday 12th of April 2017 07:00:00 AM

Jekyll is a free and open source static site generator. Like a content management system (for example, Drupal and WordPress), Jekyll can be used to build websites with rich and easy-to-use navigation. Unlike Drupal and WordPress, however, Jekyll generates all the content at once, instead of waiting for people to visit your website's pages.


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Python vs. Ruby: Which is best for web development?

Tuesday 11th of April 2017 07:02:00 AM

Python and Ruby are among some of the most popular programming languages for developing websites, web-based apps, and web services.

In many ways, the two languages have a lot in common. Visually they are quite similar, and both provide programmers with high-level, object-oriented coding, an interactive shell, standard libraries, and persistence support. However, Python and Ruby are worlds apart in their approach to solving problems because their syntax and philosophies vary greatly, primarily because of their respective histories.


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How to program games with the LÖVE gaming engine on the Raspberry Pi

Tuesday 11th of April 2017 07:01:00 AM

The Raspberry Pi is famous for introducing kids to open source software and programming. The Pi is an affordable, practical introduction to professional-grade computing, disguised as hackable fun.


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What to do when your open source hobby becomes a project

Tuesday 11th of April 2017 07:00:00 AM

Many software developers have their own side projects, which are often open source projects. When those open source hobbies grow too big, how do developers manage them?

All open business and projects face this problem: If they grow too big, more members are necessary for carrying the collective load. Their strategies for scaling are important.

One popular open source community recently faced this problem. And the way that community surmounted it teaches us something about the art of scaling an open organization.


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Top 10 and editor's picks: March review

Tuesday 11th of April 2017 06:00:00 AM

Opensource.com brought in 666,696 unique visitors who generated 1,115,124 page views in March, our sixth consecutive month with more than 1,000,000 page views.

We published 90 articles in March, including 12 that were a part of our Raspberry Pi series, which is always one of our reader favorites.

We welcomed 20 new authors, and almost 65% of our content was contributed by members of the open source community. Our community moderators contributed 19 articles.


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How to install Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi

Monday 10th of April 2017 07:02:00 AM

Are you looking for a phone system for your small business or home office? I've been interested in a scalable VoIP (Voice over IP) solution, and that's when I came across an implementation of Asterisk on the Raspberry Pi.


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Top 5 programming languages for DevOps

Monday 10th of April 2017 07:01:00 AM

I've been focused on infrastructure for the majority of my career, and the specific technical skills required have shifted over time. In this article, I'll lay out five of the top programming languages for DevOps, and the resources that have been most helpful for me as I've been adding those development skills to my infrastructure toolset.


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How the open source model will soar above the rest

Monday 10th of April 2017 07:00:00 AM

Defining a project is more than just discussing the results of the deliverable. For a project manager, this definition is about learning how to balance a series of interrelated elements. When it comes to the process of creation, the project manager has to manage the dependencies and the project's critical chain. The project manager also has to communicate effectively with the various stakeholders' personalities and the dynamic differences between Waterfall and Agile development methods.


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Top 5: Functional programming, Python frameworks, and more

Friday 7th of April 2017 07:16:00 PM

In this week's Top 5, we highlight mocking web APIs with Flashback, the secret (or not so secret) role of sustainers in open source, validating certificates with Golang, building GUIs with Python frameworks, and a fly-by introduction to functional programming.

Top 5 articles of the week

5. Introducing Flashback, an Internet mocking tool


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More in Tux Machines

openSUSE Leap 15 Will Succeed 42.3

What comes after openSUSE Leap 42.3 for SUSE's community non-rolling distribution? Version 15. Richard Brown announced on the behalf of the openSUSE Board and Leap Release Manager that the next version after openSUSE Leap 42.3 will be openSUSE Leap 15. Yes, that's after pre-42 was openSUSE 13.2. Read more Also: Mailinglist Archive: opensuse-project (15 mails)

Leftovers: Software

  • GNU Guile 2.2.1 released
    We are happy to announce GNU Guile release 2.2.1, the first bug-fix release in the new 2.2 stable release series.
  • Announcing Nylas Mail 2.0 [Ed: just Electron]
  • Cerebro Is An Amazing Open Source OS X Spotlight Alternative For Linux [Ed: also just Electron]
    You may be fed up with traditional way of searching/opening applications on your system. Cerebro is an amazing utility built using Electron and available for Linux, Windows, and Mac. It is open-source and released under MIT license.
  • Flowblade Another Video Editor for Linux? Give It A Try!
    You may have favorite video editor to edit your videos but there is no harm to try something new, its initial release was not that long, with time it made some great improvements. It can be bit hard to master this video editor but if you are not new in this field you can make it easily and will be total worth of time.
  • Get System Info from CLI Using `NeoFetch` Tool in Ubuntu/Linux Mint
  • Ukuu Kernel Manager Utility lets You Upgrade or Install Kernels in Ubuntu/Linux Mint
    There are many ways to upgrade your Linux Kernel using Synaptics, command line and so. The Ukuu utility is the simply solution to manager your Ubuntu/Linux Mint kernels. If you want to test new fixes in the Linux Kernel then you can install Mainline Kernels released by Ubuntu team but mainline Kernels are intended to use for testing purposes only (so be careful).
  • 10 Reasons Why You Should Use Vi/Vim Text Editor in Linux
    While working with Linux systems, there are several areas where you’ll need to use a text editor including programming/scripting, editing configuration/text files, to mention but a few. There are several remarkable text editors you’ll find out there for Linux-based operating systems.
  • OpenShot 2.3 Linux Video Editor New Features
    It’s been quite some time since we last talked about OpenShot, and more specifically when it had its second major release. Recently, the team behind the popular open source video editor has made its third point release available which happens to come with a couple of exciting new features and tools, so here is a quick guide on where to find them and how to use them.
  • Boostnote: Another Great Note Taking App for Developers? Find Out By Yourself
    Boostnote is an open-source note-taking application especially made for programmers and developers, it is build up with Electron framework and cross-platform available for Linux, Windows and Mac. Being programmers, we take lots of notes which includes commands, code snippets, bug information and so on. It all comes in handy when you have organized them all in one place, Boostnote does this job very well. It lets you organize your notes in folders with tags, so you can find anything you are looking for very quickly.
  • Collabora Office 5.3 Released
    Today we released Collabora Office 5.3 and Collabora GovOffice 5.3, which contain great new features and enhancements. They also contains all fixes from the upstream libreoffice-5-3 branch and several backported features.

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