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Updated: 2 weeks 2 days ago

Through the looking glass: Security and the SRE

Wednesday 28th of March 2018 07:00:00 AM

"We can no longer design state-dependent security in a stateless world." —Rinehart

"We form the hypothesis, but we never test it." —Bergstrom


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How to build a digital pinhole camera with a Raspberry Pi

Tuesday 27th of March 2018 07:03:00 AM

At the tail end of 2015, the Raspberry Pi Foundation surprised the world by releasing the diminutive Raspberry Pi Zero. What's more, they gave it away for free on the cover of the MagPi magazine. I immediately rushed out and trawled around several newsagents until I found the last two copies in the area. I wasn't sure what I would use them for, but I knew their small size would allow me to do interesting projects that a full-sized Pi could not satisfy.


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Reliable IoT event logging with syslog-ng

Tuesday 27th of March 2018 07:02:00 AM

For any device connected to the internet or a network, it's essential that you log events so you know what the device is doing and can address any potential problems. Increasingly those devices include Internet of Things (IoT) devices and embedded systems.


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Do you speak the same language as the rest of your team?

Tuesday 27th of March 2018 07:01:00 AM

A common, shared vocabulary is at the the heart of data quality and data management initiatives, not to mention effective team communication. On top of that, however, an explicit and common language also critical for maintaining a community-centered organizational culture.


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Loop better: A deeper look at iteration in Python

Tuesday 27th of March 2018 07:00:00 AM

Python's for loops don't work the way for loops do in other languages. In this article we're going to dive into Python's for loops to take a look at how they work under the hood and why they work the way they do.

Looping gotchas

We're going to start off our journey by taking a look at some "gotchas." After we've learned how looping works in Python, we'll take another look at these gotchas and explain what's going on.


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Digitizing VHS with Linux, creating a Bash completion script, Ansible, home automation, and more

Monday 26th of March 2018 04:20:00 PM

Last week our most popular articles covered a spectrum of fun and practical uses for technology at home and in the workplace. Here's the list of reader favorites from March 19-25:


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Manage your workstation with Ansible: Automating configuration

Monday 26th of March 2018 07:03:00 AM

Ansible is an amazing automation and configuration management tool. It is mainly used for servers and cloud deployments, and it gets far less attention for its use in workstations, both desktops and laptops, which is the focus of this series.

In the first part of this series, I showed you basic usage of the ansible-pull command, and we created a playbook that installs a handful of packages. That wasn't extremely useful by itself, but it set the stage for further automation.


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4 command line note-taking applications for Linux

Monday 26th of March 2018 07:02:00 AM

When you need to save a code snippet or a URL, an idea or a quote, you probably fire up a text editor or turn to a desktop or web-based note-taking tool. But those aren't your only options. If you spend time working in terminal windows, you can use one of the many note-taking tools available for the Linux command line.

Let's take a look at of those four apps.

tnote
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Start a blog in 30 minutes with Hugo, a static site generator written in Go

Monday 26th of March 2018 07:01:00 AM

Do you want to start a blog to share your latest adventures with various software frameworks? Do you love a project that is poorly documented and want to fix that? Or do you just want to create a personal website?


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How to create an open source stack using EFK

Monday 26th of March 2018 07:00:00 AM

Managing an infrastructure of servers is a non-trivial task. When one cluster is misbehaving, logging in to multiple servers, checking each log, and using multiple filters until you find the culprit is not an efficient use of resources.


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Top Linux tools for writers

Friday 23rd of March 2018 07:03:00 AM

If you've read my article about how I switched to Linux, then you know that I’m a superuser. I also stated that I’m not an “expert” on anything. That’s still fair to say. But I have learned many helpful things over the last several years, and I'd like to pass these tips along to other new Linux users.

Today, I’m going to discuss the tools I use when I write. I based my choices on three criteria:


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Digitizing VHS with Fedora

Friday 23rd of March 2018 07:02:00 AM

Just before Christmas, I decided it was time for my kids to see one of my favorite movies: The Muppet Christmas Carol. I grabbed the tape (yes, tape) off the shelf and put it in the VCR (yes, VCR) and... nothing happened. Oh no!


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How to tell when moving to blockchain is a bad idea

Friday 23rd of March 2018 07:01:00 AM

So, there's this thing called "blockchain" that is quite popular…


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7 steps to DevOps hiring success

Friday 23rd of March 2018 07:00:00 AM

As many of us in the DevOps scene know, most companies are hiring, or, at least, trying to do so. The required skills and job descriptions can change entirely from company to company. As a broad overview, most teams are looking for a candidate from either an operations and infrastructure background or someone from a software engineering and development background, then combined with key skills relating to continuous integration, configuration management, continuous delivery/deployment, and cloud infrastructure. Currently in high-demand is knowledge of container orchestration.


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Why so little love for the patent grant in the MIT License?

Friday 23rd of March 2018 07:00:00 AM

Too often, I hear it said that the MIT License has no patent license, or that it has merely some possibility of an "implied" patent license. If the MIT License was sensitive, it might develop an inferiority complex in light of the constant praise heaped on its younger sibling, the Apache License, which conventional wisdom says has a "real" patent license.


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How to create a Bash completion script

Thursday 22nd of March 2018 07:03:00 AM

I recently worked on creating a Bash completion script for a project, and I enjoyed it very much. In this post, I will try to familiarize you with the process of creating a Bash completion script.

What is Bash completion?

Bash completion is a functionality through which Bash helps users type their commands more quickly and easily. It does this by presenting possible options when users press the Tab key while typing a command.


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Tips for building a Kubernetes proof of concept

Thursday 22nd of March 2018 07:02:00 AM

What is the best way to introduce a new technology into your employer's ecosystem? You'd probably start by scheduling a meeting. But what if you're asked what the benefits are, if it will save money, and how it will make developers more efficient?

The answers may be obvious to you, but you need to be prepared to relay this information in a way that makes business sense. It's much easier to explain these benefits when you have a proof of concept.


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Where does OpenStack fit in a public cloud world?

Thursday 22nd of March 2018 07:01:00 AM

Public clouds are taking over the world. Every day, more and more companies are moving their infrastructure to services like AWS or Microsoft Azure to save capital and operational costs. This begs the question: Where does this leave OpenStack?

In this post, we'll explore how OpenStack is competing in a market dominated by public cloud providers, and how it is positioned to grow in the future, especially in the hybrid cloud business.


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Management alone can't drive open culture change

Thursday 22nd of March 2018 07:00:00 AM

Recently an article about the ways that profound social and cultural shifts are forcing a reorganization of the climate justice movement circulated. It contains a bit of criticism against the "Big Greens"—global non-profits like Greenpeace.

Those global non-profits, author Kevin Buckland argues, don't always resemble the empowered organizations they champion elsewhere:


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How to use Ansible to patch systems and install applications

Wednesday 21st of March 2018 07:03:00 AM

Have you ever wondered how to patch your systems, reboot, and continue working?

If so, you'll be interested in Ansible, a simple configuration management tool that can make some of the hardest work easy. For example, system administration tasks that can be complicated, take hours to complete, or have complex requirements for security.


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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

GNOME Development and Events

  • Dependencies with code generators got a lot smoother with Meson 0.46.0
    Most dependencies are libraries. Almost all build systems can find dependency libraries from the system using e.g. pkg-config. Some can build dependencies from source. Some, like Meson, can do both and toggle between them transparently. Library dependencies might not be a fully solved problem but we as a community have a fairly good grasp on how to make them work. However there are some dependencies where this is not enough. A fairly common case is to have a dependency that has some sort of a source code generator. Examples of this include Protocol Buffers, Qt's moc and glib-mkenums and other tools that come with Glib. The common solution is to look up these binaries from PATH. This works for dependencies that are already installed on the system but fails quite badly when the dependencies are built as subprojects. Bootstrapping is also a bit trickier because you may need to write custom code in the project that provides the executables.
  • Expanding Amtk to support GUIs with headerbar
    I initially created the Amtk library to still be able to conveniently create a traditional UI without using deprecated GTK+ APIs, for GNOME LaTeX. But when working on Devhelp (which has a modern UI with a GtkHeaderBar) I noticed that some pieces of information were duplicated in order to create the menus and the GtkShortcutsWindow.
  • GLib/GIO async operations and Rust futures + async/await
    Unfortunately I was not able to attend the Rust+GNOME hackfest in Madrid last week, but I could at least spend some of my work time at Centricular on implementing one of the things I wanted to work on during the hackfest. The other one, more closely related to the gnome-class work, will be the topic of a future blog post once I actually have something to show.
  • Introducing Chafa
  • Infra Hackfest
  • Madrid GNOME+Rust Hackfest, part 3 (conclusion)
    I'm back home now, jetlagged but very happy that gnome-class is in a much more advanced a state than it was before the hackfest. I'm very thankful that practically everyone worked on it!
  • GNOME loves Rust Hackfest in Madrid
    The last week was the GNOME loves Rust hackfest in Madrid. I was there, only for the first two days, but was a great experience to meet the people working with Rust in GNOME a great community with a lot of talented people.
  • GNOME Mutter 3.29.1 Now Works With Elogind, Allows For Wayland On Non-Systemd Distros
    GNOME Mutter 3.29.1 has been released as the first development snapshot of this window manager / compositor in the trek towards GNOME 3.30. Mutter 3.29.1 overshot the GNOME 3.29.1 release by one week, but for being a first development release of a new cycle has some pretty interesting changes. Among the work found in Mutter 3.29.1 includes: - Mutter can now be built with elogind. That is the systemd-logind as its own standalone package. This in turn allows using Mutter with its native Wayland back-end on Linux distributions using init systems besides systemd.

KDE: Plasma Widgets, PIM Update and More

  • 3 Students Accepted for Google Summer of Code 2018
    Since 2006, we have had the opportunity for Google to sponsor students to help out with Krita. For 2018 we have 3 talented students working over the summer. Over the next few months they will be getting more familiar with the Krita code base and working on their projects. They will be blogging about their experience and what they are learning along the way. We will be sure to share any progress or information along the way. Here is a summary of their projects and what they hope to achieve.
  • Plasma widgets – Beltway Bandit Unlimited
    The concept of addons is an interesting one. At some point over the past decade or two, companies developing (successful) software realized that bundling an ever-growing code base into their products in order to meet the spiraling tower of requests from their users would result in unsustainable bloat and complexity that would not warrant the new functionality. And so, the idea of addons was born. Addons come in many flavors – extensions, plugins, applets, scripts, and of course, widgets. A large number of popular programs have incorporated them, and when done with style, the extra functionality becomes as important as the core application itself. Examples that come to mind: Firefox, Notepad++, VLC, Blender. And then, there’s the Plasma desktop environment. Since inception, KDE has prided itself on offering complete solutions, and the last incarnation of its UI framework is no different. Which begs the question, what, how and why would anyone need Plasma widgets? We explore. [...] Conclusion A good mean needs no seasoning, indeed. And Plasma is a proof of that, with the widgets the best example. Remarkably, this desktop environment manages to juggle the million different usage needs and create a balanced compromise that offers pretty much everything without over-simplifying the usage in any particular category. It’s a really amazing achievement, because normally, the sum of all requests is a boring, useless muddle. Plasma’s default showing is rich, layered, complex yet accessible, and consistent. And that means it does not really need any widgets. This shows. The extras are largely redundant, with some brilliant occasional usage models here and there, but nothing drastic or critical that you don’t get out of the box. This makes Plasma different from most other addons-blessed frameworks, as they do significantly benefit from the extras, and in some cases, the extensions and plugins are critical in supplementing the missing basics. And so, if you wonder, whether you’ll embark on a wonderful journey of discovery and fun with Plasma widgets, the answer is no. Plasma offers 99% of everything you may need right there, and the extras are more to keep people busy rather than give you anything cardinal. After all, if it’s missing, it should be an integral part of the desktop environment, and the KDE folks know this. So if you’re disappointed with this article, don’t be. It means the baseline is solid, and that’s where you journey of wonders and adventure should and will be focused. 
  • My KDE PIM Update
    This blog post is long overdue, but now that I’m back home from the KDE PIM Sprint in Toulouse, which took place last weekend, there’s some more news to report.
  • KDAB at QtDay 2018
    QtDay is the yearly Italian conference about Qt and Qt-related technologies. Its 2018 edition (the seventh so far!) will be once more in the beautiful city of Florence, on May 23 and 24. And, once more, KDAB will be there.
  • Google Summer of Code 2018 with KDE
    It’s been 2 days since the GSoC accepted student list was announced and I’m still getting goosebumps thinking about the moment I saw my name on the website. I started contributing to open source after attending a GSoC session in our college by one of our senior and a previous GSoC student with KDE: Aroonav Mishra. I was very inspired by the program and that defined the turning point of my life. [...] Then I came across GCompris and it caught my eye. I started contributing to it and the mentors are really very helpful and supportive. They always guided me whenever I needed any help  or was stuck at anything. Under their guidance, I learnt many things during the period of my contributions. I had never thought I would get this far.

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