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Introduction to the Linux chmod command

Wednesday 28th of August 2019 07:01:00 AM

Every object on your Linux system has a permission mode that describes what actions a user can perform on it. There are three types of permissions: read (r), write (w), and execute (x).


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What are environment variables in Bash?

Wednesday 28th of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

Environment variables contain information about your login session, stored for the system shell to use when executing commands. They exist whether you’re using Linux, Mac, or Windows. Many of these variables are set by default during installation or user creation.

While environment variables apply to all modern systems, this article specifically addresses environment variables in the Bash shell on Linux, BSD, Mac, and Cygwin.


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A dozen ways to learn Python

Tuesday 27th of August 2019 07:02:00 AM

Python is one of the most popular programming languages on the planet. It's embraced by developers and makers everywhere. Most Linux and MacOS computers come with a version of Python pre-installed, and now even a few Windows computer vendors are installing Python too.

Maybe you're late to the party, and you want to learn but don't know where to turn. These 12 resources will get you started and well on your way to proficiency with Python.


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Why Spinnaker matters to CI/CD

Tuesday 27th of August 2019 07:01:00 AM

It takes many tools to deliver an artifact into production. Tools for building and testing, tools for creating a deployable artifact like a container image, tools for authentication and authorization, tools for maintaining infrastructure, and more. Seamlessly integrating these tools into a workflow can be transformative for an engineering culture, but doing it yourself can be a tall order.


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6 crucial tips for leading a cross-functional team

Tuesday 27th of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

So you've taken on the challenge of leading your first cross-functional project, one that requires voluntary effort from people across organizational functions to achieve its objective. Congratulations!

But amidst your excitement over the opportunity to prove yourself, you're also feeling anxious about how you're actually going to do it?


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Implementing edge computing, DevOps like car racing, and more industry trends

Monday 26th of August 2019 01:05:00 PM

As part of my role as a senior product marketing manager at an enterprise software company with an open source development model, I publish a regular update about open source community, market, and industry trends for product marketers, managers, and other influencers. Here are five of my and their favorite articles from that update.


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Using variables in Bash

Monday 26th of August 2019 07:02:00 AM

In computer science (and casual computing), a variable is a location in memory that holds arbitrary information for later use. In other words, it’s a temporary storage container for you to put data into and get data out of. In the Bash shell, that data can be a word (a string, in computer lingo) or a number (an integer).


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5 ops tasks to do with Ansible

Monday 26th of August 2019 07:01:00 AM

In this DevOps world, it sometimes appears the Dev half gets all the limelight, with Ops the forgotten half in the relationship. It's almost as if the leading Dev tells the trailing Ops what to do, with almost everything "Ops" being whatever Dev says it should be. Ops, therefore, gets left behind, punted to the back, relegated to the bench.

I'd like to see more OpsDev happening. So let's look at a handful of things Ansible can help you do with your day-to-day Ops life. 


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Introduction to the Linux chown command

Monday 26th of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

Every file and directory on a Linux system is owned by someone, and the owner has complete control to change or delete the files they own. In addition to having an owning user, a file has an owning group.

You can view the ownership of a file using the ls -l command:


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Happy birthday to the Linux kernel: What's your favorite release?

Sunday 25th of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

Let's take a trip back to August 1991, when history was in the making. The tech world faced many pivotal moments that continue to impact us today. An intriguing project called the World Wide Web was announced by Tim Berners-Lee and the first website was launched. Super Nintendo was released in the United States and a new chapter of gaming began for kids of all ages. At the University of Helsinki, a student named Linus Torvalds asked his peers for feedback on a new free operating system he had been developing as a hobby. It was then that the Linux kernel was born.


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How to compile a Linux kernel in the 21st century

Saturday 24th of August 2019 07:01:00 AM

In computing, a kernel is the low-level software that handles communication with hardware and general system coordination. Aside from some initial firmware built into your computer's motherboard, when you start your computer, the kernel is what provides awareness that it has a hard drive and a screen and a keyboard and a network card. It's also the kernel's job to ensure equal time (more or less) is given to each component so that your graphics and audio and filesystem and network all run smoothly, even though they're running concurrently.


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How UCLA Library preserves rare objects with open source

Saturday 24th of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

The University of California, Los Angeles, (UCLA) Library houses a collection of millions of rare and unique objects, including materials dating from 3000 BCE, that could be damaged, destroyed, or otherwise threatened if they were displayed.

To make these special collections widely available while keeping them secure, the UCLA Library has been modernizing its digital repository, which was established 15 years ago on now-outdated software.


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The Linux kernel: Top 5 innovations

Friday 23rd of August 2019 07:02:00 AM

The word innovation gets bandied about in the tech industry almost as much as revolution, so it can be difficult to differentiate hyperbole from something that’s actually exciting. The Linux kernel has been called innovative, but then again it’s also been called the biggest hack in modern computing, a monolith in a micro world.

Setting aside marketing and modeling, Linux is arguably the most popular kernel of the open source world, and it’s introduced some real game-changers over its nearly 30-year life span.


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Dive into the life and legacy of Alan Turing: 5 books and more

Friday 23rd of August 2019 07:01:00 AM

Recently, Bank of England Governor, Mark Carney, announced that Alan Turning would be the new face on the UK£ 50 note.


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The lifecycle of Linux kernel testing

Friday 23rd of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

In Continuous integration testing for the Linux kernel, I wrote about the Continuous Kernel Integration (CKI) project and its mission to change how kernel developers and maintainers work. This article is a deep dive into some of the more technical aspects of the project and how all the pieces fit together.


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How the Linux desktop has grown

Thursday 22nd of August 2019 07:02:00 AM

I first installed Linux in 1993. At that time, you really didn't have many options for installing the operating system. In those early days, many people simply copied a running image from someone else. Then someone had the neat idea to create a "distribution" of Linux that let you customize what software you wanted to install. That was the Softlanding Linux System (SLS) and my first introduction to Linux.


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How to move a file in Linux

Thursday 22nd of August 2019 07:01:00 AM

Moving files in Linux can seem relatively straightforward, but there are more options available than most realize. This article teaches beginners how to move files in the GUI and on the command line, but also explains what’s actually happening under the hood, and addresses command line options that many experience users have rarely explored.


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What piece of advice had the greatest impact on your career in DevOps?

Thursday 22nd of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

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Build a distributed NoSQL database with Apache Cassandra

Wednesday 21st of August 2019 07:02:00 AM

Recently, I got a rush request to get a three-node Apache Cassandra cluster with a replication factor of two working for a development job. I had little idea what that meant but needed to figure it out quickly—a typical day in a sysadmin's job.

Here's how to set up a basic three-node Cassandra cluster from scratch with some extra bits for replication and future node expansion.


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5 notable open source 3D printers

Wednesday 21st of August 2019 07:01:00 AM

Open source hardware and 3D printers go together like, well, open source hardware and 3D printers. Not only are 3D printers used to create all sorts of open source hardware—there are also a huge number of 3D printers that have been certified as open source by the Open Source Hardware Association. That fact means that they are freely available to improve and build upon.


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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Games: Steam Library Beta, OBS, FRACTiLE and More

  • Valve have already begun tweaking the new Steam Library Beta

    With the new Steam Library Beta now available for everyone to test, Valve have started tweaking it based on feedback.

  • Video recording and livestreaming app OBS Studio has a big new release out

    Some really great new features made it into this release like the ability to actually pause a recording. That will come in very handy, when you want to keep a single file but you know there's times you don't want in it. This can certainly help cut down on editing time for a lot of situations. You can also use a script to pause recordings when a specific scene is up, like when you've run to the toilet or something—handy! To get pausing to work though, you cannot share the encoder between recording and streaming.

  • Physics-based space shoot 'em up Hyper Ultra Astronautics allows up to 16 players for total madness

    FRACTiLE Games just released Hyper Ultra Astronautics, a physics-based local multiplayer space shoot 'em with Linux support.

  • The dev of Rings of Saturn thinks going cross-platform 'paid off'

    Currently in Early Access on itch.io and Steam, the developer of the top-down hard sci-fi space sim ΔV: Rings of Saturn seems to think doing a Linux and Mac build was worth it. Before getting into the details of it, let's have a reminder of what the game actually is. Developed by Kodera Software, a one-person studio from Poland, Rings of Saturn follows the unexpected discovery of valuable minerals within the rings of Saturn. This has sparked a thriving space excavation industry and you're going out there to hopefully strike it rich. The developer said it's "backed up with real physics and science" and the attention to detail is pretty amazing.

  • Total War Saga: TROY officially announced and it will be coming to Linux next year

    Good news for fans of strategy games today as Total War Saga: TROY has been officially announced by Creative Assembly and SEGA. It's also getting a Linux port once again from Feral Interactive. Inspired by Homer’s Iliad, it focuses on the historical flashpoint of the Trojan War, evolving the series with new period-inspired features. Creative Assembly said you will be able to explore it from both the Greek and Trojan perspectives allowing you to peel back "the layers of myth and legend to reveal the realities that may have inspired them". Taking place in the late Bronze Age, this will be the the furthest back in time the Total War franchise has gone with its setting. Right on the Steam store page, it very clearly states "A Total War Saga: TROY will be released for macOS and Linux shortly after Windows.". Feral Interactive will be doing the port just like they did with previous Total War titles as confirmed on their official site. Exciting to see another top title officially coming to Linux—brilliant!

  • Squad-based zombie apocalypse strategic rogue-lite Deadly Days has officially released

    Deadly Days is a game I've played repeatedly over the course of it being in Early Access, it's good fun and it's officially out now with a big update. What to expect from it? You control a small squad, which you equip with various weapons to go through a series of randomly generated locations to loot for scrap and more equipment. You need to direct your survivors around each map and while they can act by themselves, you can also take a bit more direct control to aim their weapons. Additionally, you also have special abilities like dropping bombs, healing, speeding them up and so on.

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