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Unboxing the Raspberry Pi 4

Tuesday 6th of August 2019 07:03:00 AM

When the Raspberry Pi 4 was announced at the end of June, I wasted no time. I ordered two Raspberry Pi 4 Starter Kits the same day from CanaKit. The 1GB RAM version was available right away, but the 4GB version wouldn't ship until July 19th. Since I wanted to try both, I ordered them to be shipped together.


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Is Perl going extinct?

Tuesday 6th of August 2019 07:02:00 AM

Is there an endangered species list for programming languages? If there is, Command Line Heroes suggests that Perl is somewhere between vulnerable and critically endangered. The dominant language of the 1990s is the focus of this week's podcast (Season 3, Episode 4) and explores its highs and lows since it was introduced over 30 years ago.


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3 tools for doing presentations from the command line

Tuesday 6th of August 2019 07:01:00 AM

Tired of creating and displaying presentation slides using LibreOffice Impress or various slightly geeky tools and frameworks? Instead, consider running the slides for your next talk from a terminal window.


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Avoiding burnout: 4 considerations for a more energetic organization

Tuesday 6th of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

In both personal and organizational life, energy levels are important. This is no less true of open organizations. Consider this: When you're tired, you'll have trouble adapting when challenges arise. When your energy is low, you'll have trouble collaborating with others. When you're feeling fatigued, building and energizing an open organization community is difficult.


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Navigating the filesystem with relative paths at the command line

Monday 5th of August 2019 07:02:00 AM

If you’re on your way to work, but you stop by a deli for breakfast first, you don’t go back home after breakfast so you can restart your journey. Instead, you continue from where you are because you understand where your office is located relative to your current location. Navigating your computer is the same way. If you change your working directory in a terminal to a subdirectory, such as Pictures, you don’t necessarily have to go home again just to make your way into Documents. Instead, you use a relative path.


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PostgreSQL, managing Windows with Ansible, and more news

Monday 5th of August 2019 07:01:00 AM

In our second monthly Ansible Around The Web, we're sharing a smorgasbord of useful Ansible information for your delectation. Read on to find stories and videos relating to databases, security, VMware, Infoblox, and Windows!

If you find an interesting Ansible story on your travels, please send us the link via Mark on Twitter, and the Ansible Community team will curate the best submissions.

On with the show…


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What's your favorite open source BI software?

Monday 5th of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

Open source software has come a long way since the Open Source Initiative was founded in February 1998. Back then, the thought of releasing source code anyone could change scared many commercial software vendors. Now, according to Red Hat's 2019 State of Enterprise Open Source survey, 99% of IT leaders say open source software plays at least a "somewhat important" role in their enterprise IT strategy.


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Protect your privacy on the internet

Saturday 3rd of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

The idea that internet privacy is important only if you have something to hide is a misconception, says Nathan Handler. Privacy is something we should all care about to protect ourselves and the people we communicate with, whether or not we're doing anything wrong or embarrassing, he says.


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The fastest open source CPU ever, Facebook shares AI algorithms fighting harmful content, and more news

Saturday 3rd of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

In this edition of our open source news roundup, we share Facebook's choice to open source two algorithms for finding harmful content, Apple's new role in the Data Transfer Project, and more news you should know.


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Understanding file paths and how to use them in Linux

Friday 2nd of August 2019 07:02:00 AM

A file path is the human-readable representation of a file or folder’s location on a computer system. You’ve seen file paths, although you may not realize it, on the internet: An internet URL, despite ancient battles fought by proprietary companies like AOL and CompuServe, is actually just a path to a (sometimes dynamically created) file on someone else’s computer.


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New research article type embeds live code and data

Friday 2nd of August 2019 07:01:00 AM

While science is supposed to be about building on each other's findings to improve our understanding of the world around us, reproducing and reusing previously published results remains challenging, even in the age of the internet. The basic format of the scientific paper—the primary means through which scientists communicate their findings—has more or less remained the same since the first papers were published in the 18th century.


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Getting started with the BBC Microbit

Friday 2nd of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

Whether you are a maker, a teacher, or someone looking to expand your Python skillset, the BBC:Microbit has something for you. It was designed by the British Broadcasting Corporation to support computer education in the United Kingdom.

The open hardware board is half the size of a credit card and packed with an ARM processor, a three-axis accelerometer, a three-axis magnetometer, a Micro USB port, a 25-pin edge connector, and 25 LEDs in a 5x5 array.


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Linux permissions 101

Thursday 1st of August 2019 07:02:00 AM

Understanding Linux permissions and how to control which users have access to files is a fundamental skill for systems administration.

This article will cover standard Linux file systems permissions, dig further into special permissions, and wrap up with an explanation of default permissions using umask.


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GitHub Pages is a CI/CD pipeline

Thursday 1st of August 2019 07:01:00 AM

One of GitHub's superpowers is the ability to magically turn your documentation into a website. If you configure a GitHub Page for your docs/ folder on your AwesomeProject website, you'll end up with yourname.github.io/awesomeproject, showing your documentation, all for free.


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Failure is a feature in blameless DevOps

Thursday 1st of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

DevOps is just another term for value stream development. What does value stream mean?

Value is what arises during our interactions with customers and stakeholders. Once we get into value stream development, we quickly realize that value is not an entity. Value constantly changes. Value is a process. Value is a flow.

Hence the term stream. Value is only value if it's a stream. And this streaming of value is what we call continuous integration (CI).


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Bash aliases you can’t live without

Wednesday 31st of July 2019 07:02:00 AM

A Bash alias is a method of supplementing or overriding Bash commands with new ones. Bash aliases make it easy for users to customize their experience in a POSIX terminal. They are often defined in $HOME/.bashrc or $HOME/bash_aliases (which must be loaded by $HOME/.bashrc).


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How to structure a multi-file C program: Part 2

Wednesday 31st of July 2019 07:01:00 AM

In Part 1, I laid out the structure for a multi-file C program called MeowMeow that implements a toy codec. I also talked about the Unix philosophy of program design, laying out a number of empty files to start with a good structure from the very beginning. Lastly, I touched on what a Makefile is and what it can do for you.


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Is the cloud right for you?

Wednesday 31st of July 2019 07:00:00 AM

Corey Quinn opened his lightning talk at the 17th annual Southern California Linux Expo (SCaLE 17x) with an apology. Corey is a cloud economist at The Duckbill Group, writes Last Week in AWS, and hosts the Screaming in the Cloud podcast. He's also a funny and engaging speaker.


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From e-learning to m-learning: Open education's next move

Tuesday 30th of July 2019 07:02:00 AM
"Access to computers and the Internet has become a basic need for education in our society."‒U.S. Senator Kent Conrad, 2004

I spent seventeen years working in higher education, both as a campus technology leader and as an adjunct professor. Today, I continue as an adjunct professor. I know firsthand that educational technology is invaluable to the teaching and learning mission of universities—and that it changes at a rapid pace.


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How to create a pull request in GitHub

Tuesday 30th of July 2019 07:01:00 AM

So, you know how to use git. You have a GitHub repo and can push to it. All is well. But how the heck do you contribute to other people's GitHub projects? That is what I wanted to know after I learned git and GitHub. In this article, I will explain how to fork a git repo, make changes, and submit a pull request.

When you want to work on a GitHub project, the first step is to fork a repo.


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More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu: Vivaldi, Screen Mirroring Android, Snap Statistics and Ubuntu on LinuxONE III

  • Vivaldi Web Browser 2.8 Released! How to Install it in Ubuntu

    Vivaldi web browser released the new stable version 2.8 today. Here’s how to install it in Ubuntu 18.04 and higher.

  • Try Screen Mirroring Android Using Wi-Fi on Ubuntu!

    In the previous article, I once discussed screen mirroring on Ubuntu using Scrcpy. I like Scrcpy because this application is very light and runs very well when Screen Mirroring. And in this article, I will try Screen Mirroring using Wi-fi(wifi). Screen Mirroring using wifi has several benefits. One of them is, we don't need to connect the device with a cable. So, when we are presentation a demo of an application made for smartphones, we can move freely because we don't use connecting cables when used for screen mirroring.

  • Popular snaps per distro

    From a distance, Linux is one big, confusing ball of passionate users and hardcore technical jargon. But as you zoom in, you can start seeing patterns – and differences. Indeed, the individual and vastly varied choice of a favorite distribution has played a major part in shaping the community conversation in the Linux space. But does this also reflect on the application usage patterns? We wanted to have a look at how users on different distributions consume snaps. So we crunched some numbers and checked the top five snaps for Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora, CentOS, Arch Linux, and Manjaro users.

  • Ubuntu on the new LinuxONE III

    A few months ago I visited the IBM offices in Poughkeepsie to sync up with colleagues, record an episode of Terminal Talk, and let’s be honest, visit some mainframes. A lot of assembly still happens in Poughkeepsie, and they have a big client center with mainframes on display, including several inside a datacenter that they give tours of. I was able to see a z14 in operation, as well as several IBM LinuxONE machines. Getting to tour datacenters is a lot of fun, and even though I wouldn’t have meaningful technical interactions with them, there’s something about seeing these massive machines that I work with every day in person that brings me a lot of joy. Now I have to go back! On September 12th, the newest mainframe was announced, the IBM z15 and accompanying Linux version, the IBM LinuxONE III. To celebrate, I joined my colleagues in the IBM Silicon Valley lab for a launch event watch party and, of course, cake.

Arch Linux Review in 2019

In constant development since 2002, Arch Linux isn’t new. It’s built up a large, loyal following of users who love Arch’s “Keep It Simple, Stupid” approach, where minimalism and choice reign supreme. No Arch Linux installation is the same, and that’s the appeal to Arch users. It isn’t the friendliest Linux distro for beginners, but if you’re looking to truly understand what a Linux distro can do, Arch Linux could be for you. At number 15 on the Distowatch popularity list over the past 12 months, Arch is also one of the most well-known Linux distros. Let’s find out why this minimalist distro continues to be popular. Read more

Audiocasts/Shows/Video: Ubuntu Podcast, Choose Linux, BSD Now and ArcoLinux 19.09 Run Through

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S12E24 – Gran Turismo

    This week we’ve been cataloging hardware (mostly crusty Thinkpads). We interview Kyle Fazzari, serior robotics engineer at Canonical, bring you some command line love and go over all your feedback. It’s Season 12 Episode 24 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Kyle Fazzari are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • Introducing New People to Linux | Choose Linux 18

    There’s lots to consider when setting someone up with Linux for the first time. User needs and expectations, distro choice, hardware, and so much more. We discuss our experiences, and ask some fundamental questions.

  • git commit FreeBSD | BSD Now 316

    NetBSD LLVM sanitizers and GDB regression test suite, Ada—The Language of Cost Savings, Homura - a Windows Games Launcher for FreeBSD, FreeBSD core team appoints a WG to explore transition to Git, OpenBSD 6.6 Beta tagged, Project Trident 12-U5 update now available, and more.

  • ArcoLinux 19.09 Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at ArcoLinux 19.09 with XFCE 4.14.

Mozilla Leftovers

  • Mozilla Localization (L10N): L10n Report: September Edition

    Please note some of the information provided in this report may be subject to change as we are sometimes sharing information about projects that are still in early stages and are not final yet.

  • Will Kahn-Greene: Markus v2.0.0 released! Better metrics API for Python projects.

    Markus is a Python library for generating metrics.

  • This Week In Rust: This Week in Rust 304

    Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved? We love contributions.

  • Mozilla VR Blog: Virtual identities in Hubs

    Identity is a complicated concept—who are we really? Most of us have government IDs that define part of our identity, but that’s just a starting point. We present ourselves differently depending on context—who we are with our loved ones might not be the same as who we are at work, but both are legitimate representations of ourselves. Virtual spaces make this even harder. We might maintain many virtual identities with different degrees of overlap. Having control over our representation and identity online is a critical component of safety and privacy, and platforms should prioritize user agency. More importantly, autonomy and privacy are intrinsically intertwined. If everyone saw my google searches, I would probably change what I search for. If I knew my employer could monitor my interactions when I’m not at work, I would behave differently. Privacy isn’t just about protecting information about myself, it’s about allowing me to express myself.