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Updated: 3 hours 42 min ago

Using Python to explore Google's Natural Language API

Tuesday 30th of July 2019 07:00:00 AM

As a technical search engine optimizer, I am always looking for ways to use data in novel ways to better understand how Google ranks websites. I recently investigated whether Google's Natural Language API could better inform how Google may be classifying a site's content.


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3 commands to reboot Linux (plus 4 more ways to do it safely)

Monday 29th of July 2019 07:02:00 AM

Linux is fully capable of running not weeks, but years, without a reboot. In some industries, that’s exactly what Linux does, thanks to advances like kpatch and kgraph.

For laptop and desktop users, though, that metric is a little extreme. While it may not be a day-to-day reality, it’s at least a weekly reality that sometimes you have a good reason to reboot your machine. And for a system that doesn’t need rebooting often, Linux offers plenty of choices for when it’s time to start over.


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How to structure a multi-file C program: Part 1

Monday 29th of July 2019 07:01:00 AM

It has often been said that the art of computer programming is part managing complexity and part naming things. I contend that this is largely true with the addition of "and sometimes it requires drawing boxes."


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Do you prefer a live demo to be perfect or broken?

Monday 29th of July 2019 07:00:00 AM

At DevFest DC in June, Sara Robinson, developer advocate at Google Cloud, gave the most seamless live demo I've ever witnessed.

Sara live-coded a machine model from scratch using TensorFlow and Keras. Then she trained the model live, deployed it to Google's Cloud AI platform, and used the deployed model to make predictions.

With the exception of perhaps one small hiccup, the whole thing went smoothly, and I learned a lot as an audience member.


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16 essentials for sysadmin superheroes

Saturday 27th of July 2019 07:00:00 AM

You know you're a sysadmin if you are either knee-deep in system logs, constantly handling user errors, or carving out time to document it all along the way. Yesterday was Sysadmin Appreciation Day and we want to give a big "thank you" to our favorite IT pros. We've pulled together the ultimate list of tasks, resources, tools, commands, and guides to help you become a sysadmin superhero.


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What does it mean to be a sysadmin hero?

Friday 26th of July 2019 07:01:00 AM

Sysadmins spend a lot of time preventing and fixing problems. There are certainly times when a sysadmin becomes a hero, whether to their team, department, company, or the general public, though the people they "saved" from trouble may never even know.

Enjoy these two stories from the community on sysadmin heroics. What does it mean to you?


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Have you thanked a sysadmin today?

Friday 26th of July 2019 07:00:00 AM

Sysadmins are the heartbeat of many open source projects around the world. What would we do without them? 

So, once a year—or more if you're working on a team with a great outlook on life and positive culture—we take time out of our busy lives to say thank you.

"Thanks for all the stress, overtime, and dedication to the mission(s), me!" —Jim Salter


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24 sysadmin job interview questions you should know

Thursday 25th of July 2019 07:02:00 AM

As a geek who always played with computers, a career after my masters in IT was a natural choice. So, I decided the sysadmin path was the right one. In the process of my career, I have grown quite familiar with the job interview process. Here is a look at what to expect, the general career path, and a set of common questions and my answers to them.


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Introduction to GNU Autotools

Thursday 25th of July 2019 07:01:00 AM

Have you ever downloaded the source code for a popular software project that required you to type the almost ritualistic ./configure; make && make install command sequence to build and install it? If so, you’ve used GNU Autotools. If you’ve ever looked into some of the files accompanying such a project, you’ve likely also been terrified at the apparent complexity of such a build system.


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How to transition into a career as a DevOps engineer

Thursday 25th of July 2019 07:00:00 AM

DevOps engineering is a hot career with many rewards. Whether you're looking for your first job after graduating or seeking an opportunity to reskill while leveraging your prior industry experience, this guide should help you take the right steps to become a DevOps engineer.


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Master the Linux 'ls' command

Wednesday 24th of July 2019 07:02:00 AM

The ls command lists files on a POSIX system. It's a simple command, often underestimated, not in what it can do (because it really does only one thing), but in how you can optimize your use of it.


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How to make an old computer useful again

Wednesday 24th of July 2019 07:01:00 AM

Have an old computer gathering dust in your basement? Why not put it to use? A backup machine could come in handy if your primary computer fails and you want to be online with a larger screen than your smartphone. Or it could act as a cheap secondary computer shared by the family. You could even make it into a retro gaming box.

You can take any computer up to a dozen years old and—with the right software—perform many of the same tasks you can with new machines. Open source software is the key.


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3 types of metric dashboards for DevOps teams

Wednesday 24th of July 2019 07:00:00 AM

Metrics dashboards enable DevOps teams to monitor the entire DevOps platform so they can respond to issues in real-time, which is critical in the event of downtime or disruption in the production environment or application services.

DevOps dashboards aggregate metrics from multiple observation tools to create monitoring reports for dev and ops teams. They also allow teams to track multiple metrics, such as service deployment times, bugs, errors, work items, backlogs, and more.


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Building an organization that's always learning: Tips for leaders

Tuesday 23rd of July 2019 07:02:00 AM

In open organizations, informal learning is critical to success. "Informal learning" accounts for all learning that occurs outside a training program, a classroom, or another formalized instruction setting. Unlike the learning in these formalized learning settings, informal learning is unstructured, personal, and voluntary.


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JavaScript's surprising rise from the ashes of the browser wars on Command Line Heroes

Tuesday 23rd of July 2019 07:01:00 AM

The third season of the Command Line Heroes podcast continues its look at the history of the programming languages we depend on every day. Episode 3, released today, investigates the origin of JavaScript. Here's the unlikely story of how it happened.


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9 people for sysadmins to follow on Twitter

Tuesday 23rd of July 2019 07:00:00 AM

While Twitter certainly isn't the most open source platform, the open source community on the social network brings a lot of great minds together on a daily basis. The site, as I see it, also democratizes access to these brilliant minds since we're all just one @ away.


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10 resources every sysadmin should know about

Monday 22nd of July 2019 07:03:00 AM

Everybody knows that sysadmins are impossibly busy people. Consequently, it sometimes seems they are superhuman. The sysadmin's dirty secret, the same one shared by many open source users, is that they don't actually do all of the work it looks like they've done. One of the greatest tools in the sysadmin's kit is their ability to reuse work someone else has already done for them.


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System administrator responsibilities: 9 critical tasks

Monday 22nd of July 2019 07:02:00 AM

System administrators are critical to the reliable and successful operation of an organization and its network operations center and data center. A sysadmin must have expertise with the system's underlying platform (i.e., Windows, Linux) as well as be familiar with multiple areas including networking, backup, data restoration, IT security, database operations, middleware basics, load balancing, and more.


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Gift ideas for Sysadmin Appreciation Day

Monday 22nd of July 2019 07:00:00 AM

Sysadmin Appreciation Day is coming up this Friday, July 26. To help honor sysadmins everywhere, we want you to share your best gift ideas. What would be the best way a team member or customer could show their appreciation for you? As a sysadmin, what was the best gift you've ever received? We asked our writers the same question, and here are their answers:


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Databases adopt open licenses, JavaScript gets faster on Android, governments use more OSS, and more news

Saturday 20th of July 2019 07:04:00 AM

In this edition of our open source news roundup, we take a look at database vendors going all in with open source, Facebook and Uber's latest open source releases, City of London's homebuilding app, and more!


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More in Tux Machines

Firefox, Graphene, Krita update in Tumbleweed

Two openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots were released this week. The snapshots furnished the update for KDE Applications 19.08.1 and updated several libraries including Intel’s Graphene library OS. Snapshot 20190917 delivered four packages. The Graphene package updated to 1.10.0 and now uses an ancillary library called (micro) µTest for its test suite, which makes possible to build and run the test suite without depending on GLib. Mozilla Firefox 69.0 provided Enhanced Tracking Protection (ETP) with stronger privacy protections and added support for receiving multiple video codecs to makes it easier for WebRTC conferencing services to mix video from different clients. The other two package updates in the snapshot were icecream 1.3, which takes compile jobs from a build and distributes it among remote machines allowing a parallel build, and the HTTP client/server library for GNOME libsoup 2.66.3. The update of icecream 1.3 improved the speed of creating compiler tarballs. The snapshot is trending at a moderately stable rating of 87, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Epiphany Technology Preview Users: Action Required

    Epiphany Technology Preview has moved from https://sdk.gnome.org to https://nightly.gnome.org. The old Epiphany Technology Preview is now end-of-life. Action is required to update. If you installed Epiphany Technology Preview prior to a couple minutes ago, uninstall it using GNOME Software and then reinstall using this new flatpakref.

  • Qt Quick on Vulkan, Metal, and Direct3D - Part 2

    Let's continue where we left off in the first post. We saw an example of a Qt Quick application running on Linux on top of OpenGL and Vulkan. We also saw a Vulkan frame capture in RenderDoc, which is not just an invaluable tool during Qt development work, but can also be useful to anyone who wants to dig deeper and understand better how Qt Quick renders a frame (or for that matter troubleshoot problems in an application's rendering). Now in this post we are going to focus on what Qt 5.14 offers for macOS and Windows.

  • Renewing the Modularity objective

    Now that Modularity is available for all Fedora variants, it’s time to address issues discovered and improve the experience for packagers and users. The Modularity team identified a number of projects that will improve the usefulness of Modularity and the experience of creating modules for packagers. We are proposing a renewed objective to the Fedora Council.

  • Boardcon Idea3399 Features-Rich SBC Comes with M.2 NVMe SSD and 4G LTE PCIe Sockets

    Back in 2017, Boardcon introduced EM3399 single board computer powered by a Rockchip RK3399 processor through the company’s PICO3399 SO-DIMM system-on-module.

  • Random Number Generator Assembly

    Learn how to assemble your NeuG USB True Random Number Generator Assembly from https://shop.fsf.org/

  • Standing on the shoulders of giants

    This changed everything, and it led to the birth of ever greater backgammon neural networks that could provide world-class competition as well as world-class analysis. The first great program to follow and raise the standard was Jellyfish, after which came Snowie, and even a magnificent open-source project: GNU Backgammon, which to this day is the second strongest backgammon software available. It too can be found at its source site. For documentation, refer to my online manual, “All About GNU”.

Android Leftovers

Linux on the mainframe: Then and now

Last week, I introduced you to the origins of the mainframe's origins from a community perspective. Let's continue our journey, picking up at the end of 1999, which is when IBM got onboard with Linux on the mainframe (IBM Z). These patches weren't part of the mainline Linux kernel yet, but they did get Linux running on z/VM (Virtual Machine for IBM Z), for anyone who was interested. Several efforts followed, including the first Linux distro—put together out of Marist College in Poughkeepsie, N.Y., and Think Blue Linux by Millenux in Germany. The first real commercial distribution came from SUSE on October 31, 2000; this is notable in SUSE history because the first edition of what is now known as SUSE Enterprise Linux (SLES) is that S/390 port. Drawing again from Wikipedia, the SUSE Enterprise Linux page explains: Read more