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Updated: 2 hours 20 min ago

Building tiny container images

14 hours 17 min ago

When Docker exploded onto the scene a few years ago, it brought containers and container images to the masses. Although Linux containers existed before then, Docker made it easy to get started with a user-friendly command-line interface and an easy-to-understand way to build images using the Dockerfile format. But while it may be easy to jump in, there are still some nuances and tricks to building container images that are usable, even powerful, but still small in size.

First pass: Clean up after yourself


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5 questions to answer before building a community

14 hours 18 min ago

I've talked to a number of business leaders recently about building communities for their company or product. While everybody recognizes the benefits of having a vibrant and active community, many are unsure about what it means and how to build it. Not knowing these details can mean wasting time and money on things that will not give you the results you want.

While interviewing for community management roles, I started asking for these details to determine whether company leaders understand why they want a community and what they want it to do for them.


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The changing role of DBAs in an "as-a-service" world

14 hours 19 min ago

There has been a massive evolution in the needs and requirements of managing and running a database in a modern enterprise over the last decade. Database administrators (DBAs) in charge of running enterprise databases are seeing a prevalent shift in focus: instead of ensuring access and availability, they are being asked to develop architecture, design, and scalability strategies that meet business needs and goals.


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3 Emacs modes for taking notes

Wednesday 18th of July 2018 07:02:00 AM

No matter what line of work you're in, it's inevitable you have to take a few notes. Often, more than a few. If you're like many people in this day and age, you take your notes digitally.


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How to check free disk space in Linux

Wednesday 18th of July 2018 07:01:00 AM

Keeping track of disk utilization information is on system administrators' (and others') daily to-do list. Linux has a few built-in utilities that help provide that information.

df

The df command stands for "disk-free," and shows available and used disk space on the Linux system.

df -h shows disk space in human-readable format

df -a shows the file system's complete disk usage even if the Available field is 0


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A 4-step plan for creating teams that aren't afraid to fail

Wednesday 18th of July 2018 07:00:00 AM

Successfully executing on a business goal implies raising questions about that goal—and it absolutely requires safe-to-fail experimentation on the path to achieving that goal. When business goals become inflexible mandates, experimentation goes by the wayside and a failure-adverse culture will prevail.

This four-step process can help open leaders cultivate a culture of experimentation in teams working toward a business goal (rather than creating the kind of failure-adverse culture that risks becoming less innovative).


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3 big steps toward building authentic developer communities

Wednesday 18th of July 2018 06:45:00 AM

As more software businesses are selling open source products, we've seen a corresponding rise in the emphasis of building out developer communities around these products as a key metric for success. Happy users are passionate advocates, and these passionate advocates raise overall awareness of a company's product offerings. Attract the right vocal influencers into your community, and customers become more interested in forming a relationship with your company.


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Ballerina reinvents cloud-native programming

Tuesday 17th of July 2018 02:10:00 PM

Cloud-native programming inherently involves working with remote endpoints: microservices, serverless, APIs, WebSockets, software-as-a-service (SaaS) apps, and more. Ballerina is a cloud-native, general purpose, concurrent, transactional, and statically- and strongly-typed programming language with both textual and graphical syntaxes.


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Getting started with Etcher.io

Tuesday 17th of July 2018 07:02:00 AM

Bootable USB drives are a great way to try out a new Linux distribution to see if you like it before you install. While some Linux distributions, like Fedora, make it easy to create bootable media, most others provide the ISOs or image files and leave the media creation decisions up to the user. There's always the option to use dd to create media on the command line—but let's face it, even for the most experienced user, that's still a pain.


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Tiny tweaks for PowerShell perfection

Tuesday 17th of July 2018 07:01:00 AM

I'm in love with PowerShell. It's the perfect blend of feature-richness and readability in scripting (power) and laconism in the command line (shell). But a rant on the cross-platform open-source awesomeness of PowerShell is best saved for another article (which I've already written and which you must read if you want your life to have meant something).


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Building your team's culture of shared responsibility

Tuesday 17th of July 2018 07:00:00 AM

Effective leaders delegate. Because healthy teams learn and grow when challenged with new tasks—and in order to take on new work without a change in staffing—teams must find ways to be more efficient and productive (or stop doing something that is no longer as important as it once was). If you're a manager or other leader in an open organization, you'll need help meeting all your strategic priorities. Delegating is a great way to get it.


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The oldest, active Linux distro, Slackware, turns 25

Tuesday 17th of July 2018 12:16:00 AM

Patrick Volkerding didn't set out to create a Linux distribution. He just wanted to simplify the process of installing and configuring Softlanding Linux System. But when SLS didn't pick up his improvements, Volkerding decided to release his work as Slackware. On July 17, 1993, he announced version 1.0. A quarter century and 30-plus versions later, Slackware is the oldest actively maintained Linux distribution.


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Sysadmin guides, open source email clients, MacOS apps, SELinux, Firefox extensions, and more

Monday 16th of July 2018 05:55:00 PM

Reader favorites from last week included articles for sysadmins, Linux games, tool round ups, and more.


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Get our Linux networking cheat sheet

Monday 16th of July 2018 07:02:00 AM

If your daily tasks include managing servers and the data center's network. The following Linux utilities and commands—from basic to advanced—will help make network management easier.

In several of these commands, you'll see <fqdn>, which stands for "fully qualified domain name." When you see this, substitute your website URL or your server (e.g., server-name.company.com), as the case may be.


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Confessions of a recovering Perl hacker

Monday 16th of July 2018 07:01:00 AM

My name's MikeCamel, and I'm a Perl hacker.

There, I've said it. That's the first step.


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Is BDFL a death sentence?

Monday 16th of July 2018 07:00:00 AM

A few days ago, Guido van Rossum, creator of the Python programming language and Benevolent Dictator For Life (BDFL) of the project, announced his intention to step away.


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Win a year of access to O&#039;Reilly eBooks, videos, support, and more

Monday 16th of July 2018 06:59:00 AM

OSCON 2018 happens this week in Portland, Oregon! To celebrate, we're giving away a one-year subscription to O'Reilly Safari, a US $399/year membership that gives users access to thousands of technology and business ebooks, videos, live online trainings, and real-time support from experts.


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What&#039;s the difference between a fork and a distribution?

Friday 13th of July 2018 07:02:00 AM

If you've been around open source software for any length of time, you'll hear the terms fork and distribution thrown around casually in conversation. For many people, the distinction between the two isn't clear, so here I'll try to clear up the confusion.

First, some definitions

Before explaining the nuances of a fork vs. a distribution and the pitfalls thereof, let's define key concepts.

Open source software is software that:


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How to set up DevPI, a PyPI-compatible Python development server

Friday 13th of July 2018 07:01:00 AM

The first time I used DevPI, I was getting ready for a camping trip with my wife and kids. By "getting ready" I do not mean practicing my s'mores-making skills. I mean that I knew my kids would be entertained by camp staff some of the time, and I planned to fix a few bugs in the Twisted package. I also knew I would not have internet on the campgrounds, so I needed to be able to develop without connecting to the internet.


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Locks versus channels in concurrent Go

Friday 13th of July 2018 07:00:00 AM

Go has popularized the mantra don't communicate by sharing memory; share memory by communicating. The language does have the traditional mutex (mutual exclusion construct) to coordinate access to shared memory, but it favors the use of channels to share information among goroutines.


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More in Tux Machines

Security: Updates, First PGPainless Release, and 'The Cloud'

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • First PGPainless Release!
    PGPainless 0.0.1-alpha1 is the first non-snapshot release and is available from maven central. It was an interesting experience to go through the process of creating a release and I’m looking forward to have many more releases in the future :) The current release contains a workaround for the bug I described in an earlier blog post. The issue was, that bouncycastle wouldn’t mark the public sub keys of a secret key ring as sub keys, which results in loss of keys if the user tries to create a public key ring from the exported public keys. My workaround fixes the issue by iterating through all sub keys of an existing key ring and converting the key packages of subkeys to subkey packages. The code is also available as a gist.
  • Thousands of US voters' data exposed by robocall firm
    A Virginia-based political campaign and robocalling company, which claims it can "reach thousands of voters instantly," left a huge batch of files containing hundreds of thousands of voter records on a public and exposed Amazon S3 bucket that anyone could access without a password.  The bucket contained close to 2,600 files, including spreadsheets and audio recordings, for several US political campaigns. Kromtech Security's Bob Diachenko, who discovered the exposed data and blogged his findings, shared prior to publication several screenshots of data, packed with voters' full names, home addresses, and political affiliations.
  • Another Day, Another Pile Of Voter Data Left Laying Around On A Public Server
    Leaving private voter or customer data easily accessible on a public-facing server is the hot new fashion trend. You'll recall that it's a problem that has plagued the Defense Department, GOP data firm Deep Root Analytics (198 million voter records exposed), Verizon's marketing partners (6 million users impacted), Time Warner Cable (4 million users impacted), and countless other companies or partners that failed to implement even basic security practices. And it's a trend that shows no sign of slowing down despite repeated, similar stories (much of it thanks to analysis by security researcher Chris Vickery). This week yet another pile of private voter data was left publicly accessible for anybody to peruse. According to analysis by Kromtech Security’s Bob Dianchenko, a Virginia-based political consulting and robocalling company by the name of Robocent publicly exposed 2,600 files, including voter file spreadsheets (including voter phone numbers, names, addresses, political affiliations, gender, voting districts and more) and audio recordings for a number of political campaigns.

Canonical/Ubuntu: End of Ubuntu 17.10, Ubuntu Podcast, Snaps Add Flexibility with Tracks and Canonical Needs Help

  • PSA: Support for Ubuntu 17.10 Ends Today
    Ubuntu 17.10 reaches end of life on July 19, 2018 — which if you haven’t checked your calendar recently, is today. If you have thus far managed to resist the temptation to upgrade to a newer release then alas: today is the day when you need to start thinking about it.
  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E19 – Nineteen Minutes - Ubuntu Podcast
    It’s Season 11 Episode 19 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Ryan are connected and speaking to your brain.
  • Snaps Add Flexibility with Tracks
    Snap packages have a rich set of features beyond getting the latest shiny on your Linux distribution. Tracks enable developers to publish multiple supported releases of their application under the same name. With this enabled, a user can switch tracks at any time to install and use an alternate supported relase of software. Within each track are four standard channels named edge, beta, candidate and stable. The channels represent the risk-level users should expect from the snaps within. Edge snaps (typically built from the latest code committed) would be riskier to use than beta releases, which are more risky than stable releases. By default every application has one ‘latest’ track and the four named channels. Developers can optionally choose whether to supplement that with additional tracks. Further the developer can choose which channels to use within those tracks.
  • Canonical Needs Your Help to Test the Improved Ubuntu 18.04.1 Server Installer
    Canonical's Dimitri John Ledkov put out a call for testing for the Ubuntu community to help them test drive the improved Ubuntu Server installer in the upcoming Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS point release. Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS, the first of a total of five scheduled point releases of the long-term supported Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system series is about to be released in approximately one week from the moment of writing, on July 26, 2018, with improved and up-to-date core components and apps.
  • Help Test the New Ubuntu Server Installer
    I only ask because Canonical’s server bods are currently looking for wily folks to help them test an improved version of the new Ubuntu Server installer.

today's howtos

Graphics: ROCm, AMD, Mesa, Sway

  • ROCm 1.8.2 Released For The Open-Source Radeon Linux Compute Stack
    While waiting for the big ROCm 1.9 update, another point release to the ROCm 1.8 series is available for this Radeon Open Compute stack. Earlier this month the AMD developers working on this Linux open-source OpenCL/compute stack pushed out the ROCm 1.8.2 beta while today it was elevated to the stable channel. Details on the ROCm 1.8.2 update are unfortunately light, but based upon user reports, it seems to be able to create a working environment on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS if paired with a newer kernel. But the official Ubuntu 18.04 LTS isn't coming until ROCm 1.9.
  • Raven Ridge APUs Get Minor Performance Boost With Latest RADV Vulkan Driver
    The Raven Ridge Linux support continues to maturing. The latest on these Zen+Vega APUs using the open-source AMD Radeon Linux graphics driver stack should be slightly better performance when using the RADV Vulkan driver. RADV co-founder Bas Nieuwenhuizen landed a number of commits on Wednesday to further enhance this Mesa-based Radeon Vulkan driver. With this latest work, he's now enabled binning and DFSM by default for Raven Ridge hardware. With this being enabled now for Raven, he's found a minor performance in the range of 2~3% for some demos and games tested.
  • Freedreno Gallium3D Now Exposes Adreno A5xx Performance Counters
    It's been a while since last having any news to report on Freedrenon, the open-source, community-driven Gallium3D driver for providing accelerated 3D support for Qualcomm Adreno graphics hardware. But ahead of the upcoming Mesa 18.2 feature freeze, Freedreno founder Rob Clark has been landing a number of improvements.
  • Sway 1.0 Alpha 4 Released With Real-Time Video Capture, Atomic Layout Updates
    Learn more about the Sway 1.0 Alpha 4 release via the GitHub release announcement.