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Why it's time to embrace top-down cybersecurity practices

12 hours 20 min ago

Cybersecurity is no longer just the domain of the IT staff putting in firewalls and backing up servers. It takes a commitment from the top and a budget to match. The stakes are high when it comes to keeping your customers' information safe.


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An introduction to audio processing and machine learning using Python

12 hours 21 min ago

At a high level, any machine learning problem can be divided into three types of tasks: data tasks (data collection, data cleaning, and feature formation), training (building machine learning models using data features), and evaluation (assessing the model). Features, defined as "individual measurable propert[ies] or characteristic[s] of a phenomenon being observed," are very useful because they help a machine understand the data and classify it into categories or predict a value.


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Linux on the mainframe: Then and now

12 hours 22 min ago

Last week, I introduced you to the origins of the mainframe's origins from a community perspective. Let's continue our journey, picking up at the end of 1999, which is when IBM got onboard with Linux on the mainframe (IBM Z).

According to the Linux on z Systems Wikipedia page:


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Adding themes and plugins to Zsh

Wednesday 18th of September 2019 07:02:00 AM

In my previous article, I explained how to get started with Z-shell (Zsh). For some users, the most exciting thing about Zsh is its ability to adopt new themes. It's so easy to theme Zsh both because of the active community designing visuals for the shell and also because of the Oh My Zsh project, which makes it trivial to install them.


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The community-led renaissance of open source

Wednesday 18th of September 2019 07:01:00 AM

With few commercial participants, early free software and open source communities were, by definition, community-led. Software was designed and created organically by communities of users in response to their needs and inspiration. The results, to a degree nobody predicted, were often magical.


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Election fraud: Is there an open source solution?

Wednesday 18th of September 2019 07:00:00 AM

Can open source technology help keep our elections honest? With its Trust The Vote Project, the Open Source Election Technology (OSET) Institute is working on making that a reality for elections in the United States and around the world.


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How Ansible brought peace to my home

Tuesday 17th of September 2019 07:03:00 AM

A few months ago, I read Marco Bravo's article How to use Ansible to document procedures on Opensource.com. I will admit, I didn't quite get it at the time. I was not actively using Ansible, and I remember thinking it looked like more work than it was worth. But I had an open mind and decided to spend time looking deeper into Ansible.


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Getting started with Zsh

Tuesday 17th of September 2019 07:02:00 AM

Z-shell (or Zsh) is an interactive Bourne-like POSIX shell known for its abundance of innovative features. Z-Shell users often cite its many conveniences and credit it for increased efficiency and extensive customization.


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3 steps to developing psychological safety

Tuesday 17th of September 2019 07:01:00 AM

Psychological safety is a belief that one will not be punished or humiliated for speaking up with ideas, questions, concerns, or mistakes. And it's critical for high-performing teams in open organizations.


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Talking to machines: Lisp and the origins of AI

Tuesday 17th of September 2019 07:00:00 AM

Artificial intelligence (AI) is all the rage today, and its massive impact on the world is still to come, says the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI). According to an article on Nanalyze:


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Linux Plumbers, Appwrite, and more industry trends

Monday 16th of September 2019 02:40:00 PM

As part of my role as a senior product marketing manager at an enterprise software company with an open source development model, I publish a regular update about open source community, market, and industry trends for product marketers, managers, and other influencers. Here are five of my and their favorite articles from that update.


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How to start developing with .NET

Monday 16th of September 2019 07:02:00 AM

The .NET framework was released in 2000 by Microsoft. An open source implementation of the platform, Mono, was the center of controversy in the early 2000s because Microsoft held several patents for .NET technology and could have used those patents to end Mono implementations. Fortunately, in 2014, Microsoft declared that the .NET development platform would be open source under the MIT license from then on, and in 2016, Microsoft purchased Xamarin, the company that produces Mono.


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Linux commands to display your hardware information

Monday 16th of September 2019 07:01:00 AM

There are many reasons you might need to find out details about your computer hardware. For example, if you need help fixing something and post a plea in an online forum, people will immediately ask you for specifics about your computer. Or, if you want to upgrade your computer, you'll need to know what you have and what you can have. You need to interrogate your computer to discover its specifications.

The easiest way is to do that is with one of the standard Linux GUI programs:


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Constraint programming by example

Monday 16th of September 2019 07:00:00 AM

There are many different ways to solve problems in computing. You might "brute force" your way to a solution by calculating as many possibilities as you can, or you might take a procedural approach and carefully establish the known factors that influence the correct answer. In constraint programming, a problem is viewed as a series of limitations on what could possibly be a valid solution.


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Sandboxie's path to open source, update on the Pentagon's open source initiative, open source in Hollywood, and more

Sunday 15th of September 2019 07:30:00 PM

In this edition of our open source news roundup, Sandboxie's path to open source, update on the Pentagon's adoption of open source, open source in Hollywood, and more!


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Why the founder of Apache is all-in on blockchain

Friday 13th of September 2019 07:02:00 AM

Brian Behlendorf is perhaps best known for being a co-founder of the Apache Project, which became the Apache Software Foundation. Today, he's the executive director of the Hyperledger Foundation, an organization focused on enterprise-grade, open source, distributed ledgers (better known as blockchains). He also says he "put the first ad banner online and have been apologizing ever since."


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An introduction to Virtual Machine Manager

Friday 13th of September 2019 07:01:00 AM

In my series about GNOME Boxes, I explained how Linux users can quickly spin up virtual machines on their desktop without much fuss. Boxes is ideal for creating virtual machines in a pinch when a simple configuration is all you need.


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What politics can teach us about open source

Friday 13th of September 2019 07:00:00 AM

Many sobering lessons from history emphasize democracy is not a finished product. The Roman Empire ended in a dictatorship, while the feudal Middle Ages delivered the Magna Carta and the Renaissance; despite the American Revolution, slavery continued for many years, while the French Revolution resulted in the restoration of the monarchy. That said, more people are living in democracies around the world today than at any time before, and living standards in democracies continue to improve.


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Join Open Jam 2019 to build open source indie games

Friday 13th of September 2019 07:00:00 AM

On September 27th, dozens of indie developers will come together virtually to develop video games using open source software. This date marks the third annual Open Jam, a three-day, 80-hour online game jam dedicated to indie developers building playful games and advancing the world of open source game development.

In preparation for Open Jam 2019, we wanted to share the story of Open Jams past and preview the exciting new things coming this year!


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How to fix common pitfalls with the Python ORM tool SQLAlchemy

Thursday 12th of September 2019 07:02:00 AM

Object-relational mapping (ORM) makes life easier for application developers, in no small part because it lets you interact with a database in a language you may know (such as Python) instead of raw SQL queries. SQLAlchemy is a Python ORM toolkit that provides access to SQL databases using Python. It is a mature ORM tool that adds the benefit of model relationships, a powerful query construction paradigm, easy serialization, and much more.


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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla Leftovers

  • Mozilla Localization (L10N): L10n Report: September Edition

    Please note some of the information provided in this report may be subject to change as we are sometimes sharing information about projects that are still in early stages and are not final yet.

  • Will Kahn-Greene: Markus v2.0.0 released! Better metrics API for Python projects.

    Markus is a Python library for generating metrics.

  • This Week In Rust: This Week in Rust 304

    Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved? We love contributions.

  • Mozilla VR Blog: Virtual identities in Hubs

    Identity is a complicated concept—who are we really? Most of us have government IDs that define part of our identity, but that’s just a starting point. We present ourselves differently depending on context—who we are with our loved ones might not be the same as who we are at work, but both are legitimate representations of ourselves. Virtual spaces make this even harder. We might maintain many virtual identities with different degrees of overlap. Having control over our representation and identity online is a critical component of safety and privacy, and platforms should prioritize user agency. More importantly, autonomy and privacy are intrinsically intertwined. If everyone saw my google searches, I would probably change what I search for. If I knew my employer could monitor my interactions when I’m not at work, I would behave differently. Privacy isn’t just about protecting information about myself, it’s about allowing me to express myself.

More Games Leftovers

  • Valve have released two more experiments into Steam Labs

    Ready to be a test subject once again and possible find some new games to play? Valve have released another two tools enabling you to find something to keep you busy and keep boredom away. The first up is the Deep Dive, developed by Lars Doucet (Defender's Quest), it's an extension of the work they did on their own Diving Bell Prototype. It allows you to click through games and be presented by more based on what you've clicked, however it comes with a number of improvements over the prototype. It has a breadcrumb navigation with a Start Over button, it won't loop over as it strips out what you've already seen, Microtrailers from another Steam Labs experiment on them all and a proper Search bar. Deep Dive, thankfully, is one that should actually respect your store preferences after we had a chat about it on Twitter (#1, #2). So if you've only ticked Linux in your Steam Preferences (see the bottom), it shouldn't constantly throw Windows titles at you.

  • Fine Wine: An Interview With Codeweavers About Valve, Windows And The Future Of Gaming On Linux

    For a staggering 23 years, the developers at Codeweavers have undertaken the gargantuan task of enabling Windows software to run on Mac and Linux operating systems. Among other accomplishments, the company’s collective work and collaboration with Valve resulted in a massive leap forward in Linux gaming with Steam Proton. I recently sat down with Codeweavers CEO and Wine developer Andrew Eikum for an illuminating conversation about the challenges they face, working with Valve, and the future of gaming and software on Linux.

  • Linux commit suggests mainstream AMD Navi GPUs will launch before October 15

    Trivial and urgent. That’s probably not how AMD would like its upcoming Navi 12 GPUs to be referenced, but that’s how its open source guru, Marek Olsak, has termed the addition of the Navi PCI ID to the Mesa 3D Graphics Library in a recent commit. Trivial, presumably because adding the little bit of extra code of Navi 12’s PCI ID doesn’t take a lot of effort, but what of the ‘urgent’ tag? Are we looking at the very imminent arrival of the AMD Navi 12 graphics cards? [...] The next Mesa 3D Graphics Library release – 19.3.0-rc1 – isn’t scheduled until October 15 which kinda suggests that AMD’s open source crew wanted to get support into the 19.2 library preceding it, as compatible GPUs would presumably be available before version 19.3 drops.

  • A Total War Saga: TROY Seeing A Native Linux Port Next Year

    Creative Assembly revealed Total War Saga: TROY on Wednesday for release next year. Feral Interactive has announced they are porting this latest Total War game to macOS and Linux. Feral has done a good job punctually porting Creative Assembly's Total War games to Linux/macOS and it will continue that way for Total War Saga: TROY.

today's howtos

Games: Steam Library Beta, OBS, FRACTiLE and More

  • Valve have already begun tweaking the new Steam Library Beta

    With the new Steam Library Beta now available for everyone to test, Valve have started tweaking it based on feedback.

  • Video recording and livestreaming app OBS Studio has a big new release out

    Some really great new features made it into this release like the ability to actually pause a recording. That will come in very handy, when you want to keep a single file but you know there's times you don't want in it. This can certainly help cut down on editing time for a lot of situations. You can also use a script to pause recordings when a specific scene is up, like when you've run to the toilet or something—handy! To get pausing to work though, you cannot share the encoder between recording and streaming.

  • Physics-based space shoot 'em up Hyper Ultra Astronautics allows up to 16 players for total madness

    FRACTiLE Games just released Hyper Ultra Astronautics, a physics-based local multiplayer space shoot 'em with Linux support.

  • The dev of Rings of Saturn thinks going cross-platform 'paid off'

    Currently in Early Access on itch.io and Steam, the developer of the top-down hard sci-fi space sim ΔV: Rings of Saturn seems to think doing a Linux and Mac build was worth it. Before getting into the details of it, let's have a reminder of what the game actually is. Developed by Kodera Software, a one-person studio from Poland, Rings of Saturn follows the unexpected discovery of valuable minerals within the rings of Saturn. This has sparked a thriving space excavation industry and you're going out there to hopefully strike it rich. The developer said it's "backed up with real physics and science" and the attention to detail is pretty amazing.

  • Total War Saga: TROY officially announced and it will be coming to Linux next year

    Good news for fans of strategy games today as Total War Saga: TROY has been officially announced by Creative Assembly and SEGA. It's also getting a Linux port once again from Feral Interactive. Inspired by Homer’s Iliad, it focuses on the historical flashpoint of the Trojan War, evolving the series with new period-inspired features. Creative Assembly said you will be able to explore it from both the Greek and Trojan perspectives allowing you to peel back "the layers of myth and legend to reveal the realities that may have inspired them". Taking place in the late Bronze Age, this will be the the furthest back in time the Total War franchise has gone with its setting. Right on the Steam store page, it very clearly states "A Total War Saga: TROY will be released for macOS and Linux shortly after Windows.". Feral Interactive will be doing the port just like they did with previous Total War titles as confirmed on their official site. Exciting to see another top title officially coming to Linux—brilliant!

  • Squad-based zombie apocalypse strategic rogue-lite Deadly Days has officially released

    Deadly Days is a game I've played repeatedly over the course of it being in Early Access, it's good fun and it's officially out now with a big update. What to expect from it? You control a small squad, which you equip with various weapons to go through a series of randomly generated locations to loot for scrap and more equipment. You need to direct your survivors around each map and while they can act by themselves, you can also take a bit more direct control to aim their weapons. Additionally, you also have special abilities like dropping bombs, healing, speeding them up and so on.