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Fun on the Linux command-line, Ansible, DevOps, best books, and more

Monday 10th of December 2018 06:25:00 PM

The first few installments in our 24 days of fun Linux command-line tricks dominated our top 10 list last week. 

Do you have a suggestion for the list? Leave a comment on one of the articles or shoot us a note: open@opensource.com.

Stay up on what's going on with Opensource.com by subscribing to our highlights newsletter.


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When Linux required installation parties

Monday 10th of December 2018 08:02:00 AM

I studied math in college. Back then, ordinarily, math students didn't have access to the computer lab; pen and paper were all we needed to do our work. But for my one required programming class, I got access to the college computer lab.

It was running SunOS with remote X terminals (this was circa 1996). I immediately fell in love with Unix. I fell in love with the command line, X Windows, the utilities—all of it.


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How to build deep learning inference through Knative serverless framework

Monday 10th of December 2018 08:01:00 AM

Deep learning is gaining tremendous momentum in certain academic and industry circles. Inference—the capability to retrieve information from real-world data based on pre-trained models—is at the core of deep learning applications.


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How to get started in AI

Monday 10th of December 2018 08:00:00 AM

I've both asked and been asked about the best way to learn more about artificial intelligence (AI). What should I read? What should I watch? I'll get to that. But, first, it's useful to break down this question, given that AI covers a lot of territory.

One important distinction to draw is between the research side of AI and the applied side. Cassie Kozyrkov of Google drew this distinction in a talk at the recent O'Reilly Artificial Intelligence Conference in London, and it's a good one.


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Snake your way across your Linux terminal

Monday 10th of December 2018 08:00:00 AM

Welcome back to the Linux command-line toys advent calendar. If this is your first visit to the series, you might be asking yourself what a command-line toy even is. It's hard to say exactly, but my definition is anything that helps you have fun at the terminal.

We've been on a roll with games over the weekend, and it was fun, so let's look at one more game today, Snake!


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Powers of two, powers of Linux: 2048 at the command line

Sunday 9th of December 2018 08:00:00 AM

Hello and welcome to today's installment of the Linux command-line toys advent calendar. Every day, we look at a different toy for your terminal: it could be a game or any simple diversion that helps you have fun.

Maybe you have seen various selections from our calendar before, but we hope there’s at least one new thing for everyone.


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Optimizing Kubernetes resource allocation in production

Sunday 9th of December 2018 08:00:00 AM

My first day with Kubernetes involved dockerizing an application and deploying it to a production cluster. I was migrating one of Buffer's highest throughput (and low-risk) endpoints out of a monolithic application. This particular endpoint was causing growing pains and would occasionally impact other, higher priority traffic.


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Saving lives with open source, RISC-V and Linux Foundations team up, and more news

Saturday 8th of December 2018 08:00:00 AM

In this edition of our open source news roundup, we take a look RISC-V and Linux Foundations teaming up, open source tool for choosing chemotherapy drugs, Albania implements LibreOffice, and more!


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Play Tetris at your Linux terminal

Saturday 8th of December 2018 08:00:00 AM

Thanks for joining us for today's installment of the Linux command-line toys advent calendar. If this is your first visit to the series, you might be asking yourself, what’s a command-line toy. Even I'm not quite sure, but generally, it could be a game or any simple diversion that helps you have fun at the terminal.

It's quite possible that some of you will have seen various selections from our calendar before, but we hope there’s at least one new thing for everyone.


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Plan your own holiday calendar at the Linux command line

Friday 7th of December 2018 08:02:00 AM

Welcome to today's installment of the Linux command-line toys advent calendar. If this is your first visit to the series, you might be asking yourself, what’s a command-line toy. Even I'm not quite sure, but generally, it could be a game or any simple diversion that helps you have fun at the terminal.

It's quite possible that some of you will have seen various selections from our calendar before, but we hope there’s at least one new thing for everyone.


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Automatic continuous development and delivery of a hybrid mobile app

Friday 7th of December 2018 08:01:00 AM

Offering a mobile app is essentially a business requirement for organizations today. One of the first steps in developing an app is to understand the different types—native, hybrid (or cross-platform), and web—so you can decide which one will best meet your needs.


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Is open source wealth distribution fair?

Friday 7th of December 2018 08:00:00 AM

If wealth is the abundance of valuable possessions, open source has a wealth of software. While no one “owns” open source, some are better than others at converting this communal wealth to personal wealth.

Many open source project maintainers who produce free open source software do not have a model for deriving income from the assets they have created. However, companies that use open source software to enhance their products and services convert this valuable asset into income.


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Take a break at the Linux command line with Nyan Cat

Thursday 6th of December 2018 08:02:00 AM

We're now on day six of the Linux command-line toys advent calendar, where we explore some of the fun, entertaining, and in some cases, utterly useless toys available for your Linux terminal. All are available under an open source license.

Will they all be unique? Yes. Will they all be unique to you? I don't know, but, chances are you'll find at least one new toy to play with by the time our advent calendar is done.


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How to view XML files in a web browser

Thursday 6th of December 2018 08:01:00 AM

Once you learn that HTML is a form of XML, you might wonder what would happen if you tried to view an XML file in a browser. The results are quite disappointing—Firefox shows you a banner at the top of the page that says, "This XML file does not appear to have any style information associated with it. The document tree is shown below." The document tree looks like the file would look in an editor:


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6 steps to optimize software delivery with value stream mapping

Thursday 6th of December 2018 08:00:00 AM

Do your efforts to improve software development fall short due to confusion and too much debate? Does your organization have a clear picture of what is achievable, and are you sure you’re moving in the right direction? Can you determine how much business value you've delivered so far? Are the bottlenecks in your process known? Do you know how to optimize your current process?


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Top 10 November must-reads: Python libraries for data science, getting started with serverless computing, command-line tools, and more

Wednesday 5th of December 2018 08:40:00 PM

Thanks for another fun month of content and community on Opensource.com! Last month the site brought in 1,004,107 unique visitors who generated 1,524,240 page views. We published 84 articles in November and welcomed 17 new writers:


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Bring some color to your Linux terminal with lolcat

Wednesday 5th of December 2018 08:03:00 AM

Today marks the fifth day of the Linux command-line toys advent calendar. If this is your first visit to the series, you might be asking yourself, what’s a command-line toy. Even I'm not quite sure, but generally, it could be a game, or any simple diversion that helps you have fun at the terminal.

It's quite possible that some of you will have seen various selections from our calendar before, but we hope there’s at least one new thing for everyone.


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5 reasons to give Linux for the holidays

Wednesday 5th of December 2018 08:02:00 AM

Every year around this time, people ask me about the best computer to give (or get) for the holidays. I always give the same answer: Linux. After all, if you want your recipients to be happy, why wouldn't you give them the best operating system on the planet?

Many people don't realize they have options when it comes to computer operating systems. Just recently, two friends (who didn't do their research) fell for the clever marketing and bought brand-new systems at premium prices. I'm willing to bet that within six months they'll be dissatisfied with those expensive computers.


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Testing Ansible roles with Molecule

Wednesday 5th of December 2018 08:01:00 AM

Test techniques play an important role in software development, and this is no different when we are talking about Infrastructure as Code (IaC).

Developers are always testing, and constant feedback is necessary to drive development. If it takes too long to get feedback on a change, your steps might be too large, making errors hard to spot. Baby steps and fast feedback are the essence of TDD (test-driven development). But how do you apply this approach to the development of ad hoc playbooks or roles?


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Blueprint for a team with a DevOps mindset

Wednesday 5th of December 2018 08:00:00 AM

I've had the privilege to work with some of the brightest minds and leaders in my 33 years of software engineering. I've also been fortunate to work for a manager who made me question my career daily and systematically broke down my passion—like a destructive fire sucking the oxygen out of a sealed space. It was an unnerving period, but once I broke free, I realized I had the opportunity to reflect on one of the greatest anti-patterns for effective teams.


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More in Tux Machines

KDE4 and Plasma 5 for Slackware

  • KDE4 and Qt4 deprecation in FreeBSD
    This is a reminder — for those who don’t read all of the FreeBSD mailing lists — that KDE4 is marked deprecated in the official ports tree for FreeBSD, and will be removed at the end of this year (in about 20 days). Then Qt4 will be removed from the official ports tree in mid-march. Since both pieces of software are end-of-life and unmaintained upstream already for several years, the kde@ team at FreeBSD no longer can maintain them. Recent time-sinks were dealing with OpenSSL 1.1.1, libressl, C++17, .. the code is old, and there’s newer, nicer, better-maintained code available generally by replacing 4 with 5.
  • KDE Plasma 5 for Slackware – end of the year edition
    I just uploaded a whole new batch of packages containing KDE Plasma5 for Slackware. The previous batch, KDE 5_18.10 is already two months old and has some library compatibility issues. The new KDE 5_18.12 for Slackware consists of KDE Frameworks 5.53.0, Plasma 5.14.4 and Applications 18.08.3. All this on top of Qt 5.11.3. Compiled on the latest Slackware -current, it’s running smoothly here on my laptop. I decided against upgrading to QT 5.12.0. This is a new LTS release, but I will wait for the other distros to find bugs in this new software. Next week, KDE will release KDE Applications 18.12.0 and that too is something I want to check a bit before releasing Slackware packages. Therefore it’s likely that a new batch of packages containing Qt 5.12 and KDE Applications 18.12 will see the light shortly after the New Year.

Programming: GCC, LLVM, Rust, Ruby and Python

  • GCC 9 Guts Out The PowerPC SPE Support
    It should come as no surprise since it was deprecated in this year's GCC 8 release, but the PowerPC SPE code has been removed. This isn't to be confused with conventional POWER/PowerPC but rather PowerPC SPE that is for the "Signal Processing Engine" on older FreeScale/IBM cores like the e500. It's not all that important these days and doesn't affect newer versions of the 64-bit Power support.
  • LLVM's OpenMP Runtime Picks Up DragonFlyBSD & OpenBSD Support
    Good news for those using the LLVM Clang compiler on OpenBSD or DragonFlyBSD: the OpenMP run-time should now be supported with the latest development code.
  • Nick Cameron: Rust in 2022
    In case you missed it, we released our second edition of Rust this year! An edition is an opportunity to make backwards incompatible changes, but more than that it's an opportunity to bring attention to how programming in Rust has changed. With the 2018 edition out of the door, now is the time to think about the next edition: how do we want programming in Rust in 2022 to be different to programming in Rust today? Once we've worked that out, lets work backwards to what should be done in 2019. Without thinking about the details, lets think about the timescale and cadence it gives us. It was three years from Rust 1.0 to Rust 2018 and I expect it will be three years until the next edition. Although I think the edition process went quite well, I think that if we'd planned in advance then it could have gone better. In particular, it felt like there were a lot of late changes which could have happened earlier so that we could get more experience with them. In order to avoid that I propose that we aim to avoid breaking changes and large new features landing after the end of 2020. That gives 2021 for finishing, polishing, and marketing with a release late that year. Working backwards, 2020 should be an 'impl year' - focussing on designing and implementing the things we know we want in place for the 2021 edition. 2019 should be a year to invest while we don't have any release pressure. To me, investing means paying down technical debt, looking at our processes, infrastructure, tooling, governance, and overheads to see where we can be more efficient in the long run, and working on 'quality of life' improvements for users, the kind that don't make headlines but will make using Rust a better experience. It's also the time to investigate some high-risk, high-reward ideas that will need years of iteration to be user-ready; 2019 should be an exciting year!
  • A Java Developer Walks Into A Ruby Conference: Charles Nutter’s Open Source Journey
    As a Java developer, Nutter began looking for an existing way to run Ruby within a Java runtime environment, specifically a Java virtual machine (JVM). This would let Ruby programs run on any hardware or software platform supported by a JVM, and would facilitate writing polyglot applications that used some Java and some Ruby, with developers free to choose whichever language was best for a particular task.
  • Good ciphers in OpenJDK
  • Don’t delete the same file in its own directory
  • Create a home button on the pause scene

Audiocasts/Shows: Going Linux, Linux Thursday and More

  • Going Linux #358 · Listener Feedback
    This month we have voice feedback from Paul, suggestions on alternatives for G+, a question on OpenVPN, feedback and problems moving to Linux. Troy provides a Going Linux story on software for Linux users.
  • Linux Thursday - Dec 6, 2018
  • Gnocchi: A Scalable Time Series Database For Your Metrics with Julien Danjou - Episode 189
    Do you know what your servers are doing? If you have a metrics system in place then the answer should be “yes”. One critical aspect of that platform is the timeseries database that allows you to store, aggregate, analyze, and query the various signals generated by your software and hardware. As the size and complexity of your systems scale, so does the volume of data that you need to manage which can put a strain on your metrics stack. Julien Danjou built Gnocchi during his time on the OpenStack project to provide a time oriented data store that would scale horizontally and still provide fast queries. In this episode he explains how the project got started, how it works, how it compares to the other options on the market, and how you can start using it today to get better visibility into your operations.

Best Lightweight Linux Distros for Older Computers

Don’t throw away that old Pentium III tower and CRT monitor just yet! While that old laptop in the closet may not be able to run Windows 10 or macOS Mojave, it doesn’t mean it’s destined for the dump. Many Linux distributions are made specifically for utilizing the ancient, underpowered hardware found in older machines. By installing these lightweight distros, you can breathe new life into an old PC thought to be long past its prime. Here are the best lightweight Linux distros that we’ve picked out from the pile. Read more