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Top 5: Perl hashes and arrays, landing a Linux day job, and more

Friday 23rd of February 2018 12:55:00 PM

In this week's top 5, we take a look at Perl, wikis, what the Grateful Dead has to do with Creative Commons, and more.


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Get started with IoT: How to build a DIY Blynk Board

Friday 23rd of February 2018 08:02:00 AM

This tutorial is for those with some DIY hardware experience, though advanced beginners may find it a fun challenge. Also, experienced users might find it fun to set this up for beginners to learn from.


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Tackling the most important issue in a DevOps transformation

Friday 23rd of February 2018 08:01:00 AM

You've been appointed the DevOps champion in your organisation: congratulations. So, what's the most important issue that you need to address?

It's the technology—tools and the toolchain—right? Everybody knows that unless you get the right tools for the job, you're never going to make things work. You need integration with your existing stack (though whether you go with tight or loose integration will be an interesting question), a support plan (vendor, third party, or internal), and a bug-tracking system to go with your source code management system. And that's just the start.


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SUNY math professor makes the case for free and open educational resources

Friday 23rd of February 2018 08:00:00 AM

The open educational resources (OER) movement has been gaining momentum over the past few years, as educators—from kindergarten classes to graduate schools—turn to free and open source educational content to counter the high cost of textbooks.


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How to configure an Apache web server

Thursday 22nd of February 2018 08:02:00 AM

I have hosted my own websites for many years now. Since switching from OS/2 to Linux more than 20 years ago, I have used Apache as my server software. Apache is solid, well-known, and quite easy to configure for a basic installation. It is not really that much more difficult to configure for a more complex setup, such as multiple websites.


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5 rules for having genuine community relationships

Thursday 22nd of February 2018 08:00:00 AM

As I wrote in the first article of this three-part series on the power and importance of communities, building a community of passionate and committed members is difficult. When we launched the NethServer community, we realized early that to play the open source game, we needed to follow the open source rules. No shortcuts. We realized we had to convert the company in an open organization and start to work out in the open.


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3 reasons to say 'no' in DevOps

Thursday 22nd of February 2018 08:00:00 AM

DevOps, it has often been pointed out, is a culture that emphasizes mutual respect, cooperation, continual improvement, and aligning responsibility with authority.

Instead of saying no, it may be helpful to take a hint from improv comedy and say, "Yes, and..." or "Yes, but...". This opens the request from the binary nature of "yes" and "no" toward having a nuanced discussion around priority, capacity, and responsibility.

However, sometimes you have no choice but to give a hard "no." These should be rare and exceptional, but they will occur.


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Create a wiki on your Linux desktop with Zim

Wednesday 21st of February 2018 08:02:00 AM

There's no denying the usefulness of a wiki, even to a non-geek. You can do so much with one—write notes and drafts, collaborate on projects, build complete websites. And so much more.


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Getting started with SQL

Wednesday 21st of February 2018 08:01:00 AM

Building a database using SQL is simpler than most people think. In fact, you don't even need to be an experienced programmer to use SQL to create a database. In this article, I'll explain how to create a simple relational database management system (RDMS) using MySQL 5.6. Before I get started, I want to quickly thank SQL Fiddle, which I used to run my script. It provides a useful sandbox for testing simple scripts.


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3 warning flags of DevOps metrics

Wednesday 21st of February 2018 08:01:00 AM

Metrics. Measurements. Data. Monitoring. Alerting. These are all big topics for DevOps and for cloud-native infrastructure and application development more broadly. In fact, acm Queue, a magazine published by the Association of Computing Machinery, recently devoted an entire issue to the topic.


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How Kubernetes became the solution for migrating legacy applications

Tuesday 20th of February 2018 04:30:00 PM

In the early days of the internet, if you wanted to launch an application, you had to buy or rent hardware. This was a physical server or a rack of servers, and you needed one server per application, so it was expensive. In 2001, VMware came out with virtualization—software that allowed users to run multiple applications on the same hardware. This meant you could split up a single box into multiple virtual boxes, each running its own environment and applications. The cost savings for businesses were tremendous.


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How to format academic papers on Linux with groff -me

Tuesday 20th of February 2018 08:03:00 AM

I was an undergraduate student when I discovered Linux in 1993. I was so excited to have the power of a Unix system right in my dorm room, but despite its many capabilities, Linux lacked applications. Word processors like LibreOffice and OpenOffice were years away. If you wanted to use a word processor, you likely booted your system into MS-DOS and used WordPerfect, the shareware GalaxyWrite, or a similar program.


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Choosing project names: 4 key considerations

Tuesday 20th of February 2018 08:01:00 AM

Working on a new open source project, you're focused on the code—getting that great new idea released so you can share it with the world. And you'll want to attract new contributors, so you need a terrific name for your project.


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How slowing down made me a better leader

Tuesday 20th of February 2018 08:00:00 AM

Early in my career, I thought the most important thing I could do was act. If my boss said jump, my reply was "how high?"


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How Linux became my job

Monday 19th of February 2018 08:02:00 AM

I've been using open source since what seems like prehistoric times. Back then, there was nothing called social media. There was no Firefox, no Google Chrome (not even a Google), no Amazon, barely an internet. In fact, the hot topic of the day was the new Linux 2.0 kernel. The big technical challenges in those days?


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Perl hashes and arrays: The basics

Monday 19th of February 2018 08:01:00 AM

I get asked from time to time why I enjoy programming in Perl so much. Ask me in person, and I'll wax poetic about the community of people involved in Perl—indeed, I have done so more than once here on Opensource.com already, and I make no secret of the fact that many of my closest friends are Perl mongers.


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How the Grateful Dead were a precursor to Creative Commons licensing

Monday 19th of February 2018 08:00:00 AM

From its founding in 1965, the Grateful Dead was always an unusual band. Rising amidst the counterculture movement in the San Francisco Bay Area, the Grateful Dead’s music had roots in multiple styles and genres but did not lend itself to easy categorization. Was it psychedelic? Folk? Blues? Country? Yes, it was all of these and more. The band frequently performed well-known public domain songs, but they made the songs their own.


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Linux on Nintendo Switch, a new Kubernetes ML platform, and more news

Saturday 17th of February 2018 08:00:00 AM

In this edition of our open source news roundup, we take a look at the Mozilla's IoT gateway, a new machine learning platform, Code.mil's revamp, and more.

Open source news roundup for February 4-17, 2018 Mozilla announces Project Things for a more secure IoT

Mozilla wants you to have control over your connected devices. To help you gain that control, they've released Project Things into the wild.


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Top 5: SpaceX, drone projects, vi tips, and more

Friday 16th of February 2018 04:20:00 PM

Since Valentine's Day was earlier this week, I thought we'd focus on love. There's plenty to love in this week's top 5, so let's take a look. And before you go, be sure to enter to win a Mycroft Mark 1 voice assistant.


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The knitting printer and more art with open source

Friday 16th of February 2018 08:01:00 AM

For several years, linux.conf.au, a week-long conference (held this year from January 22-26), has held "miniconfs" offering space for tech community niche groups to share their inventions and ideas. In 2018, 12 miniconfs were held on the first two days of the conference, and the Art + Tech miniconf took the concept to the next level with an entire day of 11 talks about making art with tech, as well as an art exhibition head during the conference.


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More in Tux Machines

KDE and GNOME: KDE Discover, Okular, Librsvg, and Phone's UI Shell

  • This week in Discover, part 7
    The quest to make Discover the most-loved Linux app store continues at Warp 9 speed! You may laugh, but it’s happening! Mark my words, in a year Discover will be a beloved crown jewel of the KDE experience.
  • Okular gains some more JavaScript support
    With it we support recalculation of some fields based on others. An example that calculates sum, average, product, minimum and maximum of three numbers can be found in this youtube video.
  • Librsvg's continuous integration pipeline
    With the pre-built images, and caching of Rust artifacts, Jordan was able to reduce the time for the "test on every commit" builds from around 20 minutes, to little under 4 minutes in the current iteration. This will get even faster if the builds start using ccache and parallel builds from GNU make. Currently we have a problem in that tests are failing on 32-bit builds, and haven't had a chance to investigate the root cause. Hopefully we can add 32-bit jobs to the CI pipeline to catch this breakage as soon as possible.
  • Design report #3: designing the UI Shell, part 2
    Peter has been quite busy thinking about the most ergonomic mobile gestures and came up with a complete UI shell design. While the last design report was describing the design of the lock screen and the home screen, we will discuss here about navigating within the different features of the shell.

GNU: GLIBC and GCC News

  • Recent GNU* C library improvements
    As technology advancements continue, the core technology must be updated with new ideas that break paradigms and enable innovation. Linux* systems are based on two main core technologies: the Linux Kernel project and the GNU C Library (GLIBC) project. The GLIBC project provides the core libraries for the GNU system and GNU/Linux systems, as well as many other systems that use Linux as the kernel. These libraries provide interfaces that allow programs to manipulate and manage files, memory, threads and other operating system objects. The release of GLIBC version 2.27 marks a new step on the Linux technology roadmap, with major new features that will allow Linux developers to create and enhance applications. This blog post describes several key new features and how to use them.
  • What Makes GLIBC 2.27 Exciting To The Clear Linux Folks
    Released at the beginning of February was Glibc 2.27 and it's comprised of a lot of new features and performance improvements. But what's the best of Glibc 2.27? One of the Clear Linux developers at Intel, Victor Rodriguez Bahena, put out a blog post this week outlining some of the most exciting features for this GNU C Library update. While most Linux distributions tend to be conservative in rolling out new GLIBC updates, Clear Linux is already on v2.27 and even had back-ported some of the performance patches prior to the official 2.27 debut.
  • GCC 8 Will Let You -march=native Correctly On ARM/AArch64
    Linux developers and enthusiasts on x86_64 have long enjoyed the ability to use the -march=native option for having the GCC compiler attempt to auto-detect the CPU and set the appropriate microarchitecture flags. That support is finally being offered up for ARM with GCC 8. This week -march=native now works on AArch64 as well as for ARM in general too.

Open Source Color Management is broken

Since I am now in the business of photography and image processing (see my travel photography blog here), I thought it was time to finally get proper monitors and calibrate them. I wanted to do this with Open Source tools and use the calibration data for my Linux desktop, so I ordered a ColorHug2 colorimeter, which is Open Hardware compliant and all the tools are FOSS licensed. And from then on everything just went downhill. Read more

Devices: Microchip and TinyFPGAs

  • Microchip Introduces Tiny Cheap Linux Modules
    Linux is in everything these days, and that means designers and engineers are crying out for a simple, easy-to-use module that simplifies the design of building a product to do something with Linux. The best example of this product category would probably be the Raspberry Pi Compute Module, followed by the C.H.I.P. Pro and its GR8 module. There are dozens of boards with Allwinner and Mali chips stuffed inside that can be used to build a Linux product, and the ‘BeagleBone on a Chip’ is a fantastic product if you need Linux and want to poke pins really, really fast.
  • The Next Generation of TinyFPGAs
    Field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) have come of age. Once viewed as exotic and scary there are a number of FPGA boards targeting the maker market and among them is a new range of open source TinyFPGA boards. The latest TinyFPGA board is the TinyFPGA BX board, an updated version of their B2 board, and it’s arriving soon on Crowd Supply.