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Updated: 3 hours 20 min ago

i.MX8M Mini based module features Gyrfalcon neural accelerator

Monday 3rd of June 2019 03:30:54 PM
SolidRun’s “i.MX 8M Mini SOM” runs Linux on NXP’s up to quad-core, 1.8GHz -A53 i.MX8M Mini and works with the HummingBoard Pulse board. The module has 4GB RAM, optional WiFi/BT, and a 24 TOPS/W Gyrfalcon Lightspeeur 2803S NPU. SolidRun announced an i.MX8M Mini based compute module aimed at “a wide range of IoT and industrial […]

Hybrid RK3399 COM/SBC hacker board can plug into feature-rich carrier

Friday 31st of May 2019 09:26:29 PM
FriendlyElec’s $75, RK3399-based “SOM-RK3399” COM/SBC hybrid can stand alone or expand with a $120 “SOM-RK3399 Dev Kit” with -20 to 70℃ support and M.2 and mini-PCIe expansion. Last year, FriendlyElec released two open-spec SBCs that ran Linux and Android on the hexa-core Rockchip RK3399: the $65 and up NanoPi M4 and the smaller, $50 NanoPi […]

Tiny Apollo Lake mini-PC offers M.2 and optional PoE

Friday 31st of May 2019 05:35:24 PM
Shuttle will soon launch a compact, Linux-friendly “EN01” mini-PC series starting with an EN01J model with an Apollo Lake SoC, up to 8GB LPDDR4 and 64GB eMMC, GbE with optional PoE, and M.2 expansion. A future model will tap the Jetson TX2. Although Linux-ready mini-PCs have been around for well over a decade, the market […]

Latest Tinker boards tap RK3399Pro and Google’s i.MX8M and Edge TPU equipped Coral SOM

Friday 31st of May 2019 04:16:20 PM
Asus is prepping a “Tinker Edge R” SBC with an RK3399Pro, along with “Tinker Edge T” and “CR1S-CM-A” variants of Google’s i.MX8M and Edge TPU equipped Coral Dev Board. There’s also a 8th Gen Core based “PN60T” mini-PC with an Edge TPU. At Computex this week, Asus showed off two new open-spec Tinker boards, including […]

Intel’s NUC Compute Element is an internal variant of discontinued Compute Card

Thursday 30th of May 2019 09:03:11 PM
Intel previewed a “NUC Compute Element” with Y- or U-series Core chips, RAM, and storage that can be embedded in laptops and other devices via a proprietary connector. It also showed off several new technologies including a Honeycomb Glacier laptop with a secondary screen on the keyboard. Intel, which went to the Computex show in […]

LTE-equipped machine vision computer runs Linux on a Jetson TX2

Thursday 30th of May 2019 04:28:10 PM
[Updated: Jun. 3] — Imago’s “VisionBox Daytona” machine vision platform runs Linux on a Jetson TX2 and offers 4G LTE plus dual GbE camera ports with PoE and triggers. Other recent, Linux-based Imago systems include an octa-core VisionBox Le Mans and an EdgeBox cloud server. Imago Technologies has released a variety of Linux-ready VisionBox machine […]

MediaTek 5G SoC to debut new Cortex-A77 and Mali-G77 chips

Wednesday 29th of May 2019 09:44:20 PM
Arm unveiled a Cortex-A77 core with up to 20 percent better IPC performance over Cortex-A76 plus a faster new Mali-G77 GPU. MediaTek is combining both chips with its Helio M70 modem for a 7nm “5G SoC.” Just before Intel launched its 10nm 10th Gen Ice Lake processors at Computex, Arm revealed yet another high-end Cortex-A […]

Nvidia EGX edge-AI stack debuts on four new Jetson and Tesla-based Adlink systems

Wednesday 29th of May 2019 05:46:05 PM
Nvidia’s “Nvidia EGX” solution for AI edge computing combines its Nvidia Edge Stack and Red Hat’s Kubernetes-based OpenShift platform running on Linux-driven Jetson modules and Tesla boards. Adlink unveiled four edge servers based on EGX using the Nano, TX2, Xavier, and Tesla. Announced at this week’s Computex show in Taiwan, Nvidia EGX is billed as […]

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