Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux Gizmos

Syndicate content
Embedded Linux news & devices
Updated: 1 hour 11 min ago

Raspberry Pi CM3+ gets its own keyboard computer

Wednesday 25th of November 2020 08:50:21 PM
Clockwork is pre-selling an $219 to $249, open-spec “DevTerm” retro AiO PC kit with a Raspberry Pi CM3+, a keyboard with gamepad, a 6.8-inch IPS screen, a thermal printer, and a battery holder. Future options will include RK3399 and Allwinner H6 models. Clockwork’s open source DevTerm Kit runs Linux on a Raspberry Pi Compute Module […]

Compact embedded system runs Linux on i.MX8M

Wednesday 25th of November 2020 04:20:54 PM
MiTac’s fanless “ME1-108T” embedded computer runs Linux on an up to quad-core i.MX8M with up to 4GB LPDDR4, up to 32GB eMMC, 2x GbE, 3x USB, and HDMI, DP, serial, mini-PCIe, and 40-pin RPi GPIO. ICP Germany announced the launch of MiTac’s compact ME1-108T embedded system. Although we have reported on dozens of compute modules […]

Portwell and Congatec spin Elkhart Lake modules in multiple form factors

Tuesday 24th of November 2020 07:51:43 PM
Portwell unveiled a “PQ7-M109” Qseven module with Intel’s Atom x-6000. Congatec recently announced x6000 modules in Qseven (Conga-QA7), SMARC, (Conga-SA7), Mini Type 10 (Conga-MA7), and Compact Type 6 (Conga-TCA7) form factors. Portwell has announced the PQ7-M109, its first product based on Intel’s 10nm fabricated Elkhart Lake family of low-power system-on-chips, which includes several Atom x-6000, […]

Raspberry Pi automation add-on offers ADCs, DIDO, and UPS

Monday 23rd of November 2020 08:27:49 PM
Edgedevices.io’s second-gen “Pi-oT 2” Raspberry Pi automation add-on offers 8x ADCs, 6x digital outputs, and Ethernet plus options including a 2-hour UPS, RS485, 4x 24V digital inputs, and a 12-24VDC input. Last year, Cleveland-based Pi-oT, now called Edgedevices.io, launched a Kickstarter campaign for a Pi-oT industrial controller add-on for the Raspberry Pi that is housed […]

Linux-driven module and starter kit tap Renesas RZ/G2

Monday 23rd of November 2020 02:30:42 PM
TQ’s “TQMaRZG2x” module runs Linux on a dual- to octa-core, Cortex-A57 and -A53 based RZ/G2 processor with up to 8GB LPDDR4 and 64GB eMMC plus an optional dev kit and -40 to 85°C support. When reporting on the SMARC 2.0 SoM collaboration between Renesas and RelySys last week featuring Renesas’ scalable, 64-bit RZ/G2 processor, we […]

Tinker Board 2 SBC advances to RK3399

Friday 20th of November 2020 09:01:38 PM
Asus is prepping a “Tinker Board 2” SBC that runs Linux on a Rockchip RK3399 with up to 4GB LPDDR4, GbE, WiFi/BT, optional 16GB eMMC, 3x USB, Type-C with DP, HDMI, MIPI-DSI/CSI, and 40-pin GPIO. In 2017, Asus launched its first maker-friendly SBC with an open-spec, community backed Tinker Board SBC. Now, French site Clubic […]

Allwinner H6 SBC is loaded with media features

Thursday 19th of November 2020 06:57:04 PM
Boardcon’s 4K-ready “EMH6” SBC runs Android on a quad -A53 Allwinner H6 with 1GB RAM, 8GB eMMC, Fast and GbE LAN ports, HDMI 2.0, eDP, RGB, CVBS, analog and digital audio, 2x USB, and an M.2 slot. Boardcon is targeting the 4K OTT, DVB, and IPTV set-top markets with an EMH6 SBC that runs Android […]

SolidRun’s i.MX8M Plus module launches with HummingBoard Mate board

Thursday 19th of November 2020 05:51:20 PM
SolidRun’s iMX8M Plus CoM module runs Linux on the i.MX8M Plus with 2.3-TOPs NPU. The CoM is available as part of a new, $135-and-up, HummingBoard Mate Pico-ITX SBC and can run on the HummingBoard Pulse and Ripple. SolidRun has expanded its line of NXP i.MX8-family compute modules with an iMX8M Plus CoM equipped with NXP’s […]

Coffee Lake robotics controller to power Indy Autonomous Challenge racers

Wednesday 18th of November 2020 05:22:08 PM
Adlink’s Linux-ready “DLAP-8000” robotics controller offers a 9th Gen CPU, 4x swappable SATA, 2x PCIe x16, 2x PCIe x8, and PCIe x4. The system will be used in the Indy Autonomous Challenge (IAC). Adlink announced that its “preliminary” DLAP-8000 Series robotics controller and “industrial GPU workstation” is being used by competitors in the Indy Autonomous […]

Banana Pi quad-GbE router SBC features M.2 and five mini-PCIe slots with SIM

Wednesday 18th of November 2020 03:54:59 PM
SinoVoip’s $750 “Banana Pi GrassRouter” is a quad-GbE router board for mobile communications that runs Linux on a dual-core -A53 MediaTek MT7622E and offers 5x mini-PCIe for 4G, M.2 for 5G, and 7x SIM slots. In Aug. 2019, SinoVoip launched a $68 Banana Pi BPI-R64 router board with 4x GbE ports, a WAN port, and […]

First two i.MX8M Plus SMARC modules break cover

Tuesday 17th of November 2020 10:50:45 PM
Seco’s “SM-D18” and Adlink’s “LEC-IMX8MP” SMARC 2.1 modules run Linux or Android on NXP’s AI-enabled i.MX8M Plus with up to 8GB RAM, 64GB eMMC, dual GbE, PCIe Gen3, and optional -40 to 85°C. The first two SMARC 2.1 form-factor modules with NXP’s i.MX8M Plus SoC have appeared, joining a handful of other i.MX8M Plus modules […]

UP Xtreme i11 SBC runs pre-installed Ubuntu on Tiger Lake

Tuesday 17th of November 2020 06:06:49 PM
Aaeon unveiled a Linux-ready “UP Xtreme i11” SBC with 11th Gen Tiger Lake with up to 64GB DDR4, 3x M.2, 1GbE and 2.5GbE, 4x USB 3.2 Gen2, and a USB 4.0 Type-C port. There is also an embedded PC model. Last month, Aaeon posted a teaser announcement about some upcoming products based on Intel’s 11th […]

SMARC module runs Linux on up to octa-core Renesas RZ/G2

Monday 16th of November 2020 09:06:05 PM
Renesas and RelySys have launched a “SMARC 2.0 SoM” module that runs Linux on a Renesas RZ/G2N (2x -A57), RZ/G2M (2x -A57, 4x -A53), or RZ/G2H (4x -A57, 4x -A53). It offers 2GB to 4GB LPDDR4, 32GB eMMC, and optional WiFi/BT. Japanese chipmaker Renesas and Bangalore, India based manufacturing partner RelySys have launched a SMARC […]

Allwinner H3 maker board could be smallest Linux-powered SBC yet

Monday 16th of November 2020 05:34:43 PM
Seeed’s $49.90 “Quantum Mini” dev kit features an M.2 form-factor “Quark-N” module that runs Ubuntu Core on an Allwinner H3 plus a 40 x 35mm “Atom-N” carrier with 3x USB ports and WiFi/BT. The Quantum Mini Linux Development Kit is a collaboration between Seeed and Zhihui, a maker and AI algorithm engineer who has a […]

Universal SMARC carrier launches with Elkhart Lake module

Friday 13th of November 2020 08:34:13 PM
Data Modul announced a universal “eDM-CB-SM-IPCS” carrier for Arm and x86 SMARC modules plus a Linux-ready “eDM-SMX-EL” SMARC module featuring Intel’s Elkhart Lake Atom x6000E. One of the benefits of standardized compute module form factors such as SMARC is that manufacturers can easily upgrade to a faster new module using the same basic design and […]

Headless NanoPi combines RK3399 with dual GbE ports

Thursday 12th of November 2020 09:04:37 PM
FriendlyElec has posted specs on a “NanoPi R4S” SBC equipped with a hexa-core RK3399 with up to 4GB LPDDR4, a microSD slot, dual GbE, dual USB 3.0, and -20 to 70℃ support. Rockchip’s RK3399 has been dropping in price over the years, with RK3399-based Linux hacker boards starting at over $100 but now selling for […]

Congatec reveals Ryzen V2000 module and industrial Tiger Lake variants

Thursday 12th of November 2020 06:02:35 PM
Congatec unveiled a “Conga-TCV2” Type 6 module with AMD’s Ryzen Embedded V2000 SoC. The company also launched six -40 to 85°C versions of its Type 6 and COM-HPC Tiger Lake modules and previewed a COM-HPC carrier. Congatec has announced a Conga-TCV2 module with AMD’s Ryzen Embedded V2000 SoC that competes with with Adlink’s similarly COM […]

Ryzen V2000 shows up on SBCs, mini-PCs, and signage player

Wednesday 11th of November 2020 09:50:06 PM
ASRock unveiled a “4×4-V2000” SBC and “iBOX-V2000” mini-PC based on it that feature AMD’s Ryzen Embedded V2000. Meanwhile, Ibase previewed a Mini-ITX SBC and signage player based on the V2000. ASRock and Ibase have each announced several products based on AMD’s new Ryzen Embedded V2000 system-on-chip. ASRock’s 4×4-V2000M and 4×4-V2000V SBCs drive its new iBOX-V2000M […]

Type 6 module debuts Ryzen Embedded V2000

Tuesday 10th of November 2020 09:19:23 PM
Adlink’s Linux-ready “cExpress-AR” Compact Type 6 module features AMD’s up to octa-core Ryzen Embedded V2000 with up to 64GB DDR4-3200, 2.5GbE, 6x PCIe Gen3, 8x PCIe Gen2, and up to 4x 4K displays. Although Adlink was not on AMD’s list of hardware launch partners mentioned in this morning’s Ryzen Embedded V2000 announcement, the company unveiled […]

Ryzen Embedded V2000 brings 7nm Zen 2 to the edge

Tuesday 10th of November 2020 02:40:41 PM
AMD announced four Ryzen Embedded V2000 processors with hexa- and octa-core 7nm Zen 2 cores at up to 2.9GHz/4.25GHz plus 6x or 7x-core Radeon graphics, 10-54W TDPs, and up to 20x PCIe links. AMD has unveiled four Ryzen Embedded V2000 processors that update the 14nm Zen based Ryzen Embedded V1000 with 7nm fabricated Zen 2 […]

More in Tux Machines

Games: HIVESWAP: ACT 2, Gaming Rack Design and Construction, Parkitect and DualSense

  • Amusing adventure game HIVESWAP: ACT 2 is out now | GamingOnLinux

    With no prior knowledge of the Homestuck web comic series needed, the second part of the video game adventure is out now with HIVESWAP: ACT 2. "The artistry and humor of the golden age of adventure games meet hand-drawn 2D animation in this love letter to the point-and-click classics. Bizarre, beautifully illustrated alien landscapes and colorful characters make Alternia a joy to explore."

  • Gaming Rack Design and Construction – CubicleNate's Techpad

    I have collected a number of gaming systems throughout my life and there is little point in having them if they sit in a box or using them takes an annoying level of set-up time, making it fun prohibitive. I was then inspired by Perifractic Retro Recipes video where the computer museum has everything so nicely laid out. I looked at my mess and decided that I had to do something about it because my arrangement just isn’t presentable.

  • Theme park building game Parkitect is getting 8-player online multiplayer | GamingOnLinux

    With the second year release anniversary of the great theme park building game Parkitect coming up, Texel Raptor had a quite a huge surprise ready. Releasing on December 8 is the free cooperative online multiplayer mode. This is absolutely crazy considering the type of game it is, and one I can only imagine right now being ridiculously fun to play online with others. Eight people in total too, that's a lot of building that can get done. Texel Raptor mentioned you can see what everyone else is doing, and it's going to have a full online lobby system it seems too.

  • The DualSense Is Making Even More Sense - Boiling Steam

    As reported earlier this month, the DualSense controller from Sony was already working great out of the box on Linux. However, it wasn’t long after that that Valve added support for the more advanced features of the device. Starting November 12, Valve updated the controller to have basic input functionality with their beta Steam client:

Devices/Embedded and Open Hardware Leftovers

  • Embedded Linux for Teams | Ubuntu

    Developer-friendly embedded Linux should just deliver apps to devices. Satellite companies don’t build their own rockets. They focus on building satellites and lease a rocket to deliver it as a payload. Many developer teams also have to “build the rocket” to deliver embedded applications. Developers would be more successful, if Linux vendors made it their job to provide and maintain the scaffold that teams need to deliver embedded apps. In such a world, teams would focus on creating apps. The resulting app-centric development cycle could boil down to booting, building and deploying. Building on top of vendor-provided scaffolds, developers would create a bootable image for their target boards. Teams would then develop apps. After testing, they will build a system image that delivers all these apps. Then burn, deploy, done.

  • Personal Raspberry Pi music streamer
  • Run Pi-hole as a container with Podman on openSUSE - SUSE Communities

    There is arguably no better way to protect devices on your local network from unwanted content than Pi-hole. Add a machine running Pi-hole to your network, and it will quietly scrub all incoming traffic from pesky stuff like ads and trackers in the background. As the name suggests, Pi-hole was initially designed to run on a Raspberry Pi. But if you already have a machine running openSUSE on your network, you can deploy a Pi-hole container on it instead. And to make things a bit more interesting, you can use Podman instead of Docker for that. Installing Podman on openSUSE 15.2 is a matter of running the sudo zypper install podman command. A Pi-hole container needs the 80 and 53 ports, so make sure that these ports are available on your machine.

  • MorphESP 240 ESP32-S2 board integrates a 1.3-inch color display (Crowdfunding)

    We’ve already seen ESP32 platforms with a color display such as M5Stack, but MorphESP 240 is kind of cute with a 1.3-inch color display, features the more recent ESP32-S2 WiFi processor, and supports battery power & charging.

  • Rockchip RK3588 specifications revealed – 8K video, 6 TOPS NPU, PCIe 3.0, up to 32GB RAM

    Rockchip RK3588 is one of the most anticipated processors for the year on this side of the Internet with the octa-core processor features four Cortex-A76 cores, four Cortex-A55 cores, an NPU, and 8K video decoding support. The roadmap shows an expected launch date in Q3/Q4 2020, but sadly the release date will be pushed back in the future. Having said that, the Rockchip Developer Conference (RKDC) is now taking place, and the company has put up a poster that reveals a bit more about the processor.

  • Arduino Blog » Arduino psychic ‘magically’ guesses random numbers

    Standard Arduino Nanos can be used for many purposes, but they do not feature wireless capabilities. Somehow, though, Hari Wiguna’s Arduino psychic system is apparently able to pass data between two of them. No external communication hardware is implemented, yet one Nano is able to recognize when a random number chosen on the other Nano setup is input via an attached keypad. As noted by Wiguna, it’s easier shown than explained, and you can see this techno-magic trick in action in the first clip. How things work is revealed in the second video, but can you guess how it’s done?

Security, Digital Restrictions (DRM), and Proprietary Problems

  • Best forensic and pentesting Linux distros of 2020

    20.04 LTS and uses the Xfce desktop, and is available as a single ISO only for 64-bit machines. In addition to the regular boot options, the distro’s boot menu also offers the option to boot into a forensics mode where it doesn’t mount the disks on the computer. BackBox includes some of the most common security and analysis tools. The project aims for a wide spread of goals, ranging from network analysis, stress tests, sniffing, vulnerability assessment, computer forensic analysis, exploitation, privilege escalation, and more. All the pentesting tools are neatly organized in the Auditing menu under relevant categories. These are broadly divided into three sections. The first has tools to help you gather information about the environment, assess vulnerabilities of web tools, and more. The second has tools to help you reverse-engineer programs and social-engineer people. The third has tools for all kinds of analysis. BackBox has further customized its application menu to display tooltips with a brief description of each bundled tool, which will be really helpful for new users who aren’t familiar with the tools. As an added bonus, the distro also ships with Tor and a script that will route all Internet bound traffic from the distro via the Tor network.

  • Thanksgiving security updates

    Security updates have been issued by openSUSE (blueman, chromium, firefox, LibVNCServer, postgresql10, postgresql12, thunderbird, and xen), Slackware (bind), SUSE (bluez, kernel, LibVNCServer, thunderbird, and ucode-intel), and Ubuntu (mutt, poppler, thunderbird, and webkit2gtk).

  • Drupal core - Critical - Arbitrary PHP code execution - SA-CORE-2020-013

    AC:Complex/A:User/CI:All/II:All/E:Exploit/TD:UncommonVulnerability: Arbitrary PHP code executionCVE IDs: CVE-2020-28949CVE-2020-28948Description: The Drupal project uses the PEAR Archive_Tar library. The PEAR Archive_Tar library has released a security update that impacts Drupal. For more information please see: CVE-2020-28948 CVE-2020-28949 Multiple vulnerabilities are possible if Drupal is configured to allow .tar, .tar.gz, .bz2 or .tlz file uploads and processes them. To mitigate this issue, prevent untrusted users from uploading .tar, .tar.gz, .bz2 or .tlz files. This is a different issue than SA-CORE-2019-12, similar configuration changes may mitigate the problem until you are able to patch.

  • Financial software firm cites security, control as reasons for moving from email to Slack [Ed: Unbelievable stupidity; Slack is illegal mass surveillance and it’s centralised proprietary software (whereas E-mail can be encrypted, e2e)]

    ASX-listed financial software firm Iress is moving away from email to Slack for communications and its chief technology officer, Andrew Todd, says this is because the app offers improved security and control.

  • Introducing another free CA as an alternative to Let's Encrypt

    Let's Encrypt is an amazing organisation doing an amazing thing by providing certificates at scale, for free. The problem though was that they were the only such organisation for a long time, but I'm glad to say that the ecosystem is changing.

  • Denuvo's Anti-Piracy Protection Probably Makes Sense For Big-Selling AAA Titles

    A hacking team believed to have obtained data from gaming giant Ubisoft has published documents that claim to reveal the costs of implementing Denuvo's anti-piracy protection. While the service doesn't come cheap, the figures suggest that for a big company putting out big titles with the potential for plenty of sales, the anti-tamper technology may represent value for money.

  • Disappointing: Netflix Decides To Settle With Chooseco LLC Over 'Bandersnatch' Lawsuit

    Well, it's been quite a stupid and frustrating run in the trademark lawsuit between Netflix and Chooseco LLC, the folks behind Choose Your Own Adventure books from our youth. At issue was the Black Mirror production Bandersnatch, in which the viewer takes part in an interactive film where they help decide the outcome. The main character is creating a book he refers to as a "choose your own adventure" book. Chooseco also complained that the dark nature of the film would make the public think less of CYOA books as a result. Netflix fought back hard, arguing for a dismissal on First Amendment grounds, since the film is a work of art and the limited use or reference to CYOA books was an important, though small, part of that art. The court decided that any such argument was better made at trial and allowed this madness to proceed, leading Netflix to petition for the cancellation of Chooseco's trademark entirely. This story all seemed to be speeding towards an appropriately impactful conclusion.

  • TPM circumvention and website blocking orders: An EU perspective

    Website blocking orders in IP cases (mostly, though not solely, in relation to copyright-infringing websites) are routinely granted in several jurisdictions, whether in Europe or third countries. The availability of such relief has been established in case law, administrative frameworks and academic studies alike. The Court of Justice of the European Union ('CJEU') expressly acknowledged the compatibility of such a remedy with EU law in its 2014 decision in UPC Telekabel. Also the European Court of Human Rights recently found that, although it is necessary that this particular remedy is available within a balanced and carefully drafted legislative framework which contains a robust and articulated set of safeguards against abuse, website blocking orders are not per se contrary to the provision in Article 10 ECHR. Over time, courts and other authorities (including administrative authorities in certain EU Member States) have dealt with applications which have: been based on different legal grounds; been aimed at protecting different types of rights; and resulted in different types of orders against internet service providers ('ISPs'). An interesting recent development concerns website blocking orders in relation to websites that market and sell devices and software aimed at circumventing technological protection measures (‘TPMs’). TPMs offer rights holders an ancillary right of protection and are deployed to protect against infringement of copyright in works that subsist in multimedia content such as video games. TPMs are a cornerstone in copyright protection in the digital age where large-scale copying and dissemination of copyright-protected content is so prevalent. [...] In light of the foregoing, copyright owners appear entitled to seek injunctions against intermediaries to also block access to websites dealing with TPM-circumventing devices. The legal basis for that can also be, subject to satisfying all the other requirements under EU and national law, the domestic provision implementing Article 8(3) of the InfoSoc Directive. All in all, it appears likely that we will see more blocking orders in the future, including orders – issued by courts and competent authorities around Europe – targeting websites that provide TPM-circumventing devices. This is an unsurprising and natural evolution of website blocking jurisprudence. It also serves to show the very flexibility of this type of remedy and, matched inter alia with the loose notion of ‘intermediary’, its inherently broad availability.

  • Prolonged AWS outage takes down a big chunk of the internet

    Many apps, services, and websites have posted on Twitter about how the AWS outage is affecting them, including 1Password, Acorns, Adobe Spark, Anchor, Autodesk, Capital Gazette, Coinbase, DataCamp, Getaround, Glassdoor, Flickr, iRobot, The Philadelphia Inquirer, Pocket, RadioLab, Roku, RSS Podcasting, Tampa Bay Times, Vonage, The Washington Post, and WNYC. Downdetector.com has also shown spikes in user reports of problems with many Amazon services throughout the day.

Mozilla/Firefox: CRLite, Firefox 83 and TenFourFox

  • Querying CRLite for WebPKI Revocations • Insufficient.Coffee

    Firefox Nightly is now using CRLite to determine if websites’ certificates are revoked — e.g., if the Certificate Authority published that web browsers shouldn’t trust that website certificate. Telemetry shows that querying the local CRLite dataset is much faster than making a network connection for OCSP, which makes intuitive sense. It also avoids sending the website’s certificate information in cleartext over the network to check the revocation status: solving one of the remaining cleartext browsing data leakages in Firefox. Mozilla is currently publishing CRLite data to Remote Settings four times per day, keeping a very fresh set of revocation information for the public Web. I’ve provided some direct details on how to get at that data from the CRLite FAQ, and I want to introduce one of my command-line tools I’ve used to analyze and play with the dataset: moz_crlite_query. I’ll introduce crlite_status in a later post.

  • Firefox 83 Introduces HTTPS-Only Mode

    According to Mozilla, “the web contains millions of legacy HTTP links that point to insecure versions of websites. When you click on such a link, browsers traditionally connect to the website using the insecure HTTP protocol.” With HTTPS-Only Mode enabled, Firefox will attempt to establish HTTPS connections to every website and will ask for permission before connecting to a site that doesn’t support secure connections. Even if you click on an HTTP link or manually enter an HTTP address, Firefox will use HTTPS instead.

  • TenFourFox Development: TenFourFox FPR30b1 available

    TenFourFox Feature Parity Release 30 beta 1 is now available (downloads, hashes, release notes). I managed to make some good progress on backporting later improvements to the network and URL handling code, so there are no UI-facing features in this release, but the browser should use a bit less memory and run a little quicker especially on pages that reference a lot of resources (which, admittedly, is a lot of sites these days). There is also a minor update to the host database for basic adblock. Assuming all goes well, this release will come out parallel with Firefox 84 on or around December 15. I'll probably do an SPR-only build for the release immediately following to give myself a break; this will contain just needed security fixes, and there will most likely not be a beta.