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Updated: 3 hours 9 min ago

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Sunday 11th of May 2014 04:29:56 PM

Due to Tim’s computer fatally crashing, we are once again unable to record until further notice. It might take weeks if not months until everything is restored and setup if back to a working order because Tim is also moving between houses.

TechBytes is almost four years old and we’ve been through many periods where few shows or no shows at all were recorded. At one point I even broke his microphone (accidentally). This time too it’s only a matter of time until the show is back on track. We expect to have some interesting new guests in the future.

Stay tuned.

TechBytes Episode 88: Gaming and GNU/Linux

Monday 28th of April 2014 09:57:34 AM



Direct download as Ogg (1:35:15, 41.3 MB) | High-quality MP3 (44.8 MB) | Low-quality Ogg (24.8 MB)

Summary: An episode which focuses on the role of Free software when it comes to development of games and the role of GNU/Linux in gaming platforms

We hope you will join us for future shows and consider subscribing to the show via the RSS feed. You can also visit our archives for past shows.

As embedded (HTML5):


Your browser does not support the audio element.

Keywords: games, gnu, linux, freesw, sharing, microsoft, xbox, sony, ps4, ps3

Download:


(There is also an MP3 version)

‘Live’ TechBytes Show Using Mumble

Monday 21st of April 2014 09:33:40 AM

Free software only

TECHBYTES is almost 5 years old, but Bytes Media is turning only 3 on the 25th of April (i.e. later this week). We recently did some minor redesign of the site and expanded some sections, removing (relocating) the YouTube/Flash video from the front page, replacing it with an Ogg Theora video. Also, having surveyed various SIP options 3 years ago, we are now proud to say that we produce the show exclusively using Mumble, which is Free/open source software. We will try to invite listeners to listen to the show live this way, with Murmur as the back end (Murmur is also Free/open source software). Video editing for all the past shows was also done using Free software (Blender and OpenShot usually), not to mention audio processing, which we always did with Audacity.

We will soon announce more details regarding the ability to tune in to the show “live”, on any platform (Mumble is cross platform).

TechBytes on Surveillance

Monday 14th of April 2014 09:56:22 AM



Direct download as Ogg (1:38:36, 54.2 MB) | High-quality MP3 (52.1 MB) | Low-quality MP3 (27.9 MB)

Summary: The first audio episode in a very long time covers some of the latest happenings when it comes to privacy and, contrariwise, mass surveillance

We hope you will join us for future shows and consider subscribing to the show via the RSS feed. You can also visit our archives for past shows.

As embedded (HTML5):


Your browser does not support the audio element.

Keywords: gchq, nsa, surveillance, uk, dropbox, google, privacy, wonga, twitter, facebook

Download:


(There is also an MP3 version)

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