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Updated: 2 hours 43 min ago

SFB Games to bring Tangle Tower to Linux post-launch if there's enough demand

Monday 14th of October 2019 09:09:23 AM

Tags: Steam, Indie Game, Adventure, Point & Click

British indie studio SFB Games, developer of the highly rated Detective Grimoire are working on a new game called Tangle Tower and with a little push they could bring it to Linux.

Tangle Tower is a fully voiced point and click murder mystery adventure, set in a strange and twisted mansion. You will need to interrogate suspects and solve unique puzzles as you progress. Looks and sounds like a great game. Sadly though it's currently scheduled to release later this month only for Windows and macOS on October 22nd, so no Linux support at launch.


Watch video on YouTube.com

The good news is that they continue to remain open to supporting Linux. They were asked about this on Steam and they replied with:

Hi! We won't have a Linux version ready for launch I'm afraid. But if there's enough demand, it's something we would consider post-launch!

So if this does seem like your sort of game, it might be worth heading on over to the linked Steam forum post to let them know. It all depends on how much demand they actually want to see. The only official way developers currently have to see demand for platforms on Steam is wishlists. You also only show up as a Linux wishlist if you manually tick only Linux as your platform in Steam preferences. The downside of that, is that Linux users may not be wishlisting titles unless they are already confirmed to come to Linux.

As always though, unless it's something you would likely purchase it wouldn't make sense to post.

Hat tip to Eike.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Odds and ends, the Linux and gaming Sunday Section

Sunday 13th of October 2019 04:47:32 PM

Tags: Misc, Round-up

Almost time to begin another week full of news, before we do let's run over a few interesting happenings recently.

Let's start with two bits of recent news about Godot Engine, the free and open source game engine. The 3.2 release cycle is going strong, with a second alpha release now available. A massive list of new features and improvements coming to Godot 3.2 can be found here. What's even more exciting though is the Vulkan work coming with Godot Engine 4.0, with another short progress report post up for it. The new visual frame profiler coming certainly looks useful to help developers squeeze out some more performance.

More AMD news for you, as it has been reported by Wccftech that AMD now command around 30%+ market share of the CPU market. That's some very impressive growth, pushed forward by the Zen microarchitecture from 2017. As seen in the graph below from cpubenchmark.net, this is the highest they've seen it since 2007.

One game update we missed recently was with the brilliant turn-based tactics game Fell Seal: Arbiter's Mark, it just had a big upgrade with a New Game+ mode. Additionally they're working on what's sounding like a rather large DLC to include a bunch of new maps, monsters to fight and more they're not talking about yet. You can find Fell Seal on Humble Store and GOG as well as Steam.

Valve news now as they pushed out another Steam Beta Client update recently, with the Home and Collections buttons making a comeback (hooray). On your Library home, the Recent Games and Recent Friend Activity are now shelves you can move around or remove completely. Something I am particularly happy about, is a new option to stop the Community Content (screenshots and so on from the Steam community) on game pages loading automatically. To me, it's useless fluff that slows down loading so I now have that thankfully turned off.

For Steam's Remote Play Anywhere (streaming from your PC to other devices), Valve said it now runs over the "Steam Datagram Relay network" to make sure you get the best possible route at all times. I assume this is also work that will be used for Remote Play Together coming in a later beta. Additionally, Steam Input now has support for Power-A Fusion Xbox/Playstation 4/Switch Pro fight pads.

ScummVM 2.1.0 has now been officially released. This adds support for many more classic games including: Blade Runner, Duckman: The Graphic Adventures of a Private Dick, Hoyle Bridge, Hoyle Children's Collection, Hoyle Classic Games, Hoyle Solitaire, Hyperspace Delivery Boy!, Might and Magic IV - Clouds of Xeen, Might and Magic V - Darkside of Xeen, Might and Magic - World of Xeen, Might and Magic - Swords of Xeen, Mission Supernova Part 1, Mission Supernova Part 2, Quest for Glory: Shadows of Darkness, The Prince and the Coward and Versailles 1685.

This ScummVM release also added Text-to-Speech support on Linux and the ability to sync your saves to cloud-based file hosts which is incredibly handy.

Free game alert: Princess Remedy 2: In A Heap of Trouble, developed by Ludosity is currently 100% off (free to keep) on Steam until October 15th.

A fun email entering the GamingOnLinux inbox recently was a tip about the open source Robot War Engine, another project to create an open source game engine for the classic and brilliant RTS game Total Annihilation. While we already have Spring RTS, it has a very different feel to classic TA which RWE is aiming to stick a lot more closer to. Just recently the developer of RWE mentioned that the launcher now has Linux support.

Recent new and interesting releases:

Weekend deals reminder:

 

Hope you all had a wonderful weekend, mine has been full of rest to be ready for another full week of GamingOnLinux news.

 

This article was sponsored by…just kidding. If you wish to support GamingOnLinux you can do so across places like Patreon, Paypal, Liberapay, Flattr and Twitch. In addition to our affiliate links with GOG and Humble Store.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

What have you been playing recently and what do you think about it?

Saturday 12th of October 2019 06:22:50 PM

Tags: Misc

It's reader question time here on GamingOnLinux, something we do infrequently to generate a bit of discussion.

Having seen a number of great Linux releases lately, it's getting tough opening Steam and actually picking something to play. The very new release of Pine has certainly sucked away a lot of my time, something about the world Twirlbound created has seriously pulled me in. It's not without issues though. While forcing my CPU to stay in Performance mode has made it smoother, it definitely needs improving.

Some of the quests in Pine don't seem like they've been thought through enough with the game mechanics. There's a time you need to get special tokens from different types of creatures like gatherers, traders and guards. So to help you're given blueprints for some traps. Something that should be a challenge but I decided to run around the nearest town and just place traps directly in front of every creature around and in the space of 2 minutes it was done. It was really dumb but it worked.

The world in Pine is certainly not as big as it initially seemed either, it doesn't actually take that long to see the entire area. It gives a good illusion of a lot to do but so far it seems a little basic. Don't let me put you off though, I'm thoroughly nitpicking. Still great fun, just not even close to as expansive as expected.

Meanwhile, I've also carried on my playthrough of the latest Factorio release. Maddeningly engrossing. Incredible game, with such a massive amount of depth to it. The complexity isn't even remotely hidden and yet, it feels so ridiculously approachable it's a real joy to play.

Anyway, enough about what I've been clicking on lately. Over to you, what have you been playing recently and what do you think about it? Help your fellow readers find another interesting game to pick up.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Tactical dungeon management game Legend of Keepers has a free prologue out

Friday 11th of October 2019 09:17:26 PM

Tags: Strategy, Indie Game, Steam, Free Game, Demo, New Release

Goblinz Studio are currently developing Legend of Keepers, a tactical dungeon management game where you're the bad guys. It now has a free prologue available to test on Linux.

From what they said, it's a mix between a "Roguelite and a Dungeon Management" game. Blending two different game phases together, where you first setup a defensive force for your dungeon and then wait for the heroes to come along and see if you manage to mount a successful barrier. A bit like "a reversed dungeon crawler", as they say anyway.


Watch video on YouTube.com

Feature Highlight:

  • Place traps, launch spells and slay these damn heroes looting your dungeons
  • Fight with your monsters and discover their unique abilities
  • Hire monsters, manage your employees and your stock of traps
  • Deal with employees strikes and other fun events

Always nice to see developers bring their earlier demos, prologues, tests (and whatever else they wish to label it) onto Linux. Sadly we do see a lot of releases that clearly aren't even tested a single time on Linux, so Goblinz Studio are clearly doing it right here.

Seems like a really interesting game too, with a fantastic style to it. A little basic and short right now but impressive for a short demo of what's to come with the full game. Quite keen to see how the expand on the current idea with more strategic options, especially since the vast majority of games have you doing the dungeon crawling it's fun to be on the other side.

Want to give it a test and offer your feedback to the developer? Take a look at Legend of Keepers: Prologue on Steam.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

The GTA: San Andreas remake in Unity has a new release out

Friday 11th of October 2019 08:55:44 PM

Tags: Game Engine, Open Source, Unity

SanAndreasUnity, an open source remake of the game engine for GTA: San Andreas that aims to be cross-platform has a new release out, with better Linux support included.

Here's the highlights of the latest release:

  • remove unused asset packages added by Unity
  • SFX sounds fully supported (removed file for SFX timings)
  • don't disable vehicle's rigid body on clients (should result in better vehicle sync)
  • GXT can be imported (temporarly disabled)
  • sync aim direction for host's ped (fixes a bug when clients were spammed with errors when host's ped started aiming)
  • optimized FPSCounter - reduced GC allocations (for 50KB, of total 70KB) ; texture is updated only once per frame ;
  • all windows are drawn from single OnGUI() function - reduced GC allocations
  • assign script execution order to all scripts - the game should not behave differently on each build
  • added support for case-sensitive filesystems - Linux users no longer need to perform any setup - the game works out of the box

As a reminder, like other remakes this does require you own a copy of GTA: San Andreas and so there should be no legal issues with it since it's not handing out any assets. It's just a game engine, that can run it. Much like OpenMW, openXcom and a great many others.

I'm absolutely all for keeping games alive with new game engines, especially when they're titles that are long past being updated. The issue here is that while the project is open source so anyone could help, the limiting factor is that it's built with a proprietary game engine (Unity) which is something that was debated in the comments of our last article. Worth a read of those comments.

Anyway, you can find SanAndreasUnity on GitHub.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Dota 2 matchmaking may be less terrible now for solo players and more difficult for toxic people

Friday 11th of October 2019 01:55:14 PM

Tags: Valve, MOBA, Update

Valve continue to do some pretty big tweaks to the matchmaking system in Dota 2, with another blog post and update talking about all the improvements they're implementing.

This is following on from all the other changes recently like the ban waves and sounds like they're really pushing to make the Dota 2 community and gameplay better for everyone.

Ever played a game of Dota 2 by yourself and get matched against an entire team of people? I have, it sucks. They're all forming a strategy, while half of your team are telling each other they're going to report them. It happened for a lot of others too and Valve have finally put a stop to it. In the latest blog post, Valve said that now a five-player team will only be matched up against other five-player teams. For Solo players, they will now only be matched up with a party maximum of two, so Solo players will either now be against an entire team of other Solo players or possibly three solo players and one party of two.

That's not all though of course. Valve also adjusted the post-game screen to show the average and max queue times for players in the match "to help you determine if we formed a bad match too quickly or not", there's also a behaviour category summary for the match to help players see if the matchmaking was doing a bad job. The post-game survey they had a long time ago has also made a return with a similar feature, giving some players a chance to rate the match experience to help Valve see where they're doing badly.

Naughty players are in for a shock now too. While they've banned the most terrible players, they're also now tweaking in-game features for players who are still a nuisance but not enough to be banned. If your behaviour score is below 3,000 you can no longer use chat or voice chat until the behaviour score rises. Valve think this system "will be valuable for both protecting the larger population from outliers and as a warning system for players who are moving in the wrong direction".

Sometime soon Valve will also be revamping the new player experience, which it badly needs. Dota 2 is a very complicated game and the interface is pretty noisy when you're new to it. Seems they're waiting to get matchmaking properly sorted and dealing with smurf accounts first to give new players a better start in their first lot of games. Nice.

See the full blog post here for the rest and find Dota 2 free to play on Steam.

With all the changes Valve are doing, that I genuinely like the sound of here I might just start playing it regularly again.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Dota 2 matchmaking may be a less terrible now for solo players and more adjustments for toxic people

Friday 11th of October 2019 01:55:14 PM

Tags: Valve, MOBA, Update

Valve continue to do some pretty big tweaks to the matchmaking system in Dota 2, with another blog post and update talking about all the improvements they're implementing.

This is following on from all the other changes recently like the ban waves and sounds like they're really pushing to make the Dota 2 community and gameplay better for everyone.

Ever played a game of Dota 2 by yourself and get matched against an entire team of people? I have, it sucks. They're all forming a strategy, while half of your team are telling each other they're going to report them. It happened for a lot of others too and Valve have finally put a stop to it. In the latest blog post, Valve said that now a five-player team will only be matched up against other five-player teams. For Solo players, they will now only be matched up with a party maximum of two, so Solo players will either now be against an entire team of other Solo players or possibly three solo players and one party of two.

That's not all though of course. Valve also adjusted the post-game screen to show the average and max queue times for players in the match "to help you determine if we formed a bad match too quickly or not", there's also a behaviour category summary for the match to help players see if the matchmaking was doing a bad job. The post-game survey they had a long time ago has also made a return with a similar feature, giving some players a chance to rate the match experience to help Valve see where they're doing badly.

Naughty players are in for a shock now too. While they've banned the most terrible players, they're also now tweaking in-game features for players who are still a nuisance but not enough to be banned. If your behaviour score is below 3,000 you can no longer use chat or voice chat until the behaviour score rises. Valve think this system "will be valuable for both protecting the larger population from outliers and as a warning system for players who are moving in the wrong direction".

Sometime soon Valve will also be revamping the new player experience, which it badly needs. Dota 2 is a very complicated game and the interface is pretty noisy when you're new to it. Seems they're waiting to get matchmaking properly sorted and dealing with smurf accounts first to give new players a better start in their first lot of games. Nice.

See the full blog post here for the rest and find Dota 2 free to play on Steam.

With all the changes Valve are doing, that I genuinely like the sound of here I might just start playing it regularly again.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Extreme biking game 'Descenders' adds mod.io integration and a funny Wipeout inspired map

Friday 11th of October 2019 12:45:42 PM

Tags: Sports, Mod, Update, Steam

Get ready for a few more cuts and bruises as RageSquid and No More Robots just gave Descenders the biggest update yet. Modding support is now in using mod.io along with a massive new map.

Thanks to the mod.io integration, you can subscribe to and download mods directly in the game and it works perfectly. They said they went with mod.io instead of the Steam Workshop to ensure that everyone could play together easily, which is part of the point of mod.io to make mods cross-platform with open APIs.

They also added a new built-in level found in the Mods menu called Mt. Rosie, which seems like the biggest map in the game so far at 4km x 4km in size (seriously it's enormous). It has some huge slopes, plenty of hand-crafted areas to try out your tricks and some huge ramps.  Personally, I'm more excited about the new BikeOut map inspired by the silly Wipeout game show.


Watch video on YouTube.com

I've been testing out the BikeOut map and as expected, it's completely ridiculous. Difficult too of course, it's supposed to really challenge you. However, pretty hilarious seeing other players getting completely annihilated by all the moving parts.

Since Descenders now has multiplayer, this is going to be so much fun. Absolutely fantastic to see such a massive free update to the game.

You can pick it up from Humble Store and Steam.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

4x strategy game 'BOC: The Birth Of Civilizations' is now on Kickstarter

Friday 11th of October 2019 12:21:51 PM

Tags: 4x, Indie Game, Strategy, Upcoming, Crowdfunding

BOC is a game we highlighted last month as it certainly seems like an incredibly interesting 4x strategy game that will be supporting Linux. It's now on Kickstarter to take it through to release.

Impressively, they built their own custom cross-platform game engine for BOC. Allowing them to create a huge world for you to spread your civilization across. The developer, Code::Arts, has some rather grand sounding plans for it too. Check out the new trailer for it below:


Watch video on YouTube.com

As for what they're planning—a lot. Seriously. Starting off with nothing from the last Ice Age up to the fall of the Western Roman Empire, with the freedom to evolve your civilization how you want. They claim it's a "sandbox-like combination of progression and cultures". You will be battling against the elements with a climate simulation, a finite resources system, as well as up to 32 different planned AI with each of them evolving just like you will be with the non-linear progression system to give plenty of diversity in your play-through.

Their requested amount of funding is €45,000 and they have until November 7 to hit this goal. They've had a bit of a slow start with only around €3,000 currently raised so they're going to need a big push if they want to hit it.

You can find all the details on the Kickstarter campaign that's live now. BOC also has a Steam page you can follow. A GOG release is also planned, pending GOG accepting their game onto their store.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Pegasus Frontend, the customizable open source graphical game launcher has a new release up

Friday 11th of October 2019 12:05:26 PM

Tags: Open Source, Apps

Pegasus Frontend is certainly promising, an open source graphical game launcher you can use across Linux, MacOS, Windows, Raspberry Pi, Android and more.

With a focus on customization with full control over the UI, support for EmulationStation's gamelist files and more it certainly sounds like a useful application to manage your game library especially for big-screen usage.

A few days ago a brand new release was put out. Here's what's new in the latest version:

  • The Raspberry Pi 4 is now properly supported
  • Added Korean translation
  • Greatly improved gamepad support and compatibility across all platforms
  • Greatly improved LaunchBox compatibility
  • Added support for reloading the list of games, collection and enabled compatibility modules without restarting Pegasus
  • Bugfixes and usability improvements

Testing it out myself and gamepad support certainly works great now. My Logitech F310 was picked up without issues, so interacting with Pegasus Frontend was a breeze. Looking forward to seeing this progress further.

You can see more about it on the official site and GitHub.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

After a casual game for the weekend? Runefall 2 brings some more match-3 to Linux

Friday 11th of October 2019 11:51:35 AM

Tags: Casual, Match 3

Just released this week is Runefall 2 from Playcademy and GC Games, a pretty great looking casual match-3 game.

Match 3 games are still underserved on Linux, with very few high quality titles of the genre so it really is great to see more. People often underestimate how big the casual market is. As for Runefall 2, this is the first Linux release from Playcademy!

They say it's a match-3 "like no other", as every match you make "moves you around the world to explore and find unique items, treasure chests, veins of resources, obstacles to overcome, and more" which sounds intriguing. Check out the official trailer below:


Watch video on YouTube.com

A little more about it:

Runefall 2 improves on the original Runefall in a myriad of ways. Levels are now replayable, include full level maps to easily track your progress, and can be saved at any time without losing progress. You can even now continue exploring levels after completing them, and earn badges for fully clearing levels. Explosives can now be created by making large matches, so you can blast your way through levels. There are new types of game pieces, new blockers to destroy, updated bonus goals, improved minigames and quests, new runes and journals to collect, new level progress tracking, new characters, and so much more!

You can find Runefall 2 on Steam.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

System76 have put Coreboot into two of their main Intel-powered laptops

Friday 11th of October 2019 11:33:44 AM

Tags: Hardware

Want your next laptop to be a bit more open? System76 have announced their Galago Pro and Darter Pro now come with Coreboot, the open source boot firmware.

From what they said, this should enable their systems to boot "29%" faster. Both systems are available for pre-order now, with shipping expected to begin in the last week of October. Both sound like pretty great units for work and a little Linux gaming on the go. The Galago Pro starts at $949 while the more powerful Darter Pro starts at $999.

System76 are gradually becoming a bit more like the Apple of the Linux hardware world now. They have their own distribution with Pop!_OS, their own custom-built desktop casing with the Thelio, their work on a properly integrated firmware manager and now more devices moving over to Coreboot and it's all sounding great. A strong Linux hardware company will be awesome for the future of Linux.

You can see all their laptops on their official site here. You can also see exactly what they're using on GitHub.

Late on this, as again System76 did not send us a press release. It should hopefully be sorted going forward.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Open-world action adventure 'Pine' where humans are not top of the food chain is now available

Thursday 10th of October 2019 03:07:35 PM

Tags: Action, Adventure, Exploration, GOG, Steam, Unity, New Release

Pine certainly looks good, a proper open-world action adventure with a story depicting humans who never reached the top of the food chain. It just released with Linux support today.

Note: Both the publisher and GOG sent a copy for us.

Developed by Twirlbound with a publishing hand from Kongregate, the story and setting certainly sound great. Looks fantastic too, gives off a little bit of a Zelda Breath of the Wild vibe from the trailer and pictures. You can see the launch trailer for yourself below:


Watch video on YouTube.com

As a quick bit of history, Pine was funded thanks to the help of around 4,091 Kickstarter backers pledging €121,480 back in 2017. Linux was included as a release platform and here we are.

Something to note since it will be asked, there's a set story to follow and so there's no character creation possible in Pine. The story follows the young protagonist, Hue, as they attempt to find out more about the world they're in as the elders seem to live in fear of the outside world.

Feature Highlight:

  • A seamless open world to explore, filled to the brim with secrets, puzzles and collectibles
  • A smart simulated ecology of species who fight each other over food and territory
  • A diverse cast of species to befriend or hinder through trading, talking, questing and fighting
  • An engaging combat system that learns from your every move
  • A sweeping story of a human tribe at the bottom of the food chain, struggling for survival

I've not had it long and sadly I've already noticed one major issue on NVIDIA. If you adjust VSync, your character model instantly vanishes so you're just clothes floating around. Quite a nuisance. I've reported it to them, which they've seen and it can be worked around by quitting and reloading. There's a few other times I've seen models not appear for various things too. Hopefully this will be amongst the first lot of fixes.

It's a Unity game using OpenGL, with no Vulkan support. I've tried forcing it to Vulkan but that caused the player log file to fill up with errors and eat entirely through my HDD space so that wasn't possible it seems.

Pine has everything in it that seems like an open-world adventure I could happily play for weeks, with the ability to explore and mess around in the environment. I've already had a few laughs with it, especially the weird and wonderful animals you come across. Disturbing a nest of "Puffles" was quite amusing, weird bird-like creatures that make a lot of noise and then they all make a mad dash to get away from you. Free eggs though—winner!

Pine has a number of different animal factions, all trying to control the island. If you help one and become allied, another might start attacking you on sight. To increase your standing with a faction, you need to give them a bunch of junk you find while exploring in a Donation Box near their village.

Some time later I was exploring, trying to find one of those Donation Boxes to increase my standing with a village. I found one and just as I was about to hand over the goods, what I can only describe as a huge and colourful (and surprisingly well equipped) Turkey decided it really didn't like me. It was mad—real damn mad.

It was well and truly kicking my butt, until a Fox-like person came along and started throwing explosives everywhere! What the heck is going on? I haven't a clue but it's brilliant.

The thing is, the Fox creature wasn't trying to help me. They just happened to be rival factions. After the colourful Turkey was defeated, the cunning Fox turned their attention to me and…a few bombs later I was toast.

From what I later learned, the Donation Box was right next to a village whose entire people were hostile to me. Okay then, so I sneak back to it later and donate a ton of rocks and wood and now they're my friends. Sorted. Well, that's stretching it a bit, we're almost friends. I just need to donate a few more rocks and random stuff I find on my travels.

I keep coming across these Turkey-like creatures, which I've now learned are actually called Gobbledew. They're manic fighters, they can launch themselves right up into the air at you and all. In a group, they're quite a nuisance to deal with. Seeing my new Fox friends (which are actually called the Fexel) growl at them when they come near their territory is quite awesome—and alarming with the volume up.

The Fexel eventually take me in, after I follow their gatherers for a while and pinch whatever goodies the Gobbledew end up dropping when slain by the Fexel, which I then donate back to the Fexel. Whose the cunning one now then? Me! Now they all salute me when I walk past, they even gave me a shield! Now I'm on my way to find someone else who might be familiar with Human equipment to help me gear up. Things are looking up!

Lots of amusing encounters are possible and the world seems quite big, plenty to see and do. Incredibly promising. You know a game is definitely good when you don't want to stop playing.

Rough edges but seems a huge amount of fun. You can pick up Pine from GOG and Steam.

Note: The article originally mentioned really low performance, but that is a result of issues with my CPU Governor. Forcing it to Performance makes it a lot better. It's likely the game is doing something we quoted Croteam tallking about in a previous GOL article.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Stellaris 2.4 is out with the new Paradox Launcher included

Thursday 10th of October 2019 12:00:16 PM

Tags: Strategy, Steam, GOG, Humble Store, Update

Paradox Interactive and Paradox Development Studio have released the latest update to Stellaris, which includes the new Paradox Launcher to unify the experience.

The launcher isn't all that's new though. If you're running Stellaris from their own store or GOG they have added in cloud saving to both. Paradox also updated all factions titans "with panning light meshes", updates to the visual effects for "ther drake’s wing attack (muzzle, projectile, hit effect)" and new "/mute <user name>" and "/unmute <user name>" chat commands were added. Defence Platforms also got a boost for Outposts, providing 2 points of Piracy Suppression for their system.

A bunch of UI updates also made it in like the ability to Shift+Click on the ship count in the Fleet Manager, adding ships up to the nearest 10. There's more tooltips on the Planet Screen, a new notification when one empire guarantees the independence of another along with other minor additions and cleanups for the UI. On top of that there's some performance improvements, AI enhancements and a number of bug fixes. See all the changes in Stellaris 2.4 in this forum post.

Thankfully, the roll-out of the launcher for Stellaris is after they've already fixed up a bunch of issues. So unlike the updates for other PDS titles, it works perfectly on first run for me.

If you want to learn more about the Paradox Launcher and their reasoning for using it, along with their other plans for it check out this post from Anders Törlind, the Product Manager for it. Now only one team will work on the launcher, enabling all their games to have a similar experience across whatever store you buy their games from. This also means modding can be done easier as it won't entirely rely on the Steam Workshop. They gave a list of what to expect from it:

  • GDPR compliance
  • Login and account creation
  • Single-sign-on with distribution platform (Steam, Microsoft, more in the pipeline)
  • Account connection (Steam, Microsoft, more in the pipeline)
  • Resume from last session
  • DLC activation / deactivation
  • Mods installation (For all non-steam users)
  • Mods management
    • Load order
    • Activation / deactivation
  • Mods upload (Steam Workshop, PDX Mods)
  • Game settings (typically settings that would require a restart of the game)

Does sound like it will be quite useful. Not to be confused with their store client though, which is different.

You can grab Stellaris from Humble Store, Paradox Store, GOG and Steam.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Bizarre action-RPG 'Insignificant' where you're three inches tall is out now with Linux support

Thursday 10th of October 2019 11:34:10 AM

Tags: Action, RPG, Indie Game, New Release, Unity

Insignificant is an action-RPG that tells the story of the little people and when I say that I really do mean tiny little people, you're only about three inches tall.

Note: Key provided by the developer to our Steam Curator.

Probably one of the most bizarre experiences I've had recently. Developed by Significant Games, which is mostly just Dan Rickmers. This is the first release from Rickmers, who deals with autism and while the game doesn't touch on autism they said they do hope to continue making games in future, "which represents the experiences of autistic folks like myself".

Check out the trailer:


Watch video on YouTube.com

The design of Insignificant is just so thoroughly strange. Everything about it is so mixed up and odd. The main UI for example, is like drawings on a piece of paper stuck on your screen for your health and enemy health, while the menu to look over your character is like you're using an old handheld gaming device like a Tamagotchi (it even has a little pet for you) and then you have a Compendium book to access things like a Map. Weirdly though, it sort of works in a charmingly unique way.

Feature Highlight:

  • EXPerience a wildly creative and personal story that GOES PLACES. You know that that means, right?
  • EXPlode enemies with bullets from your magic finger guns, slice them with a sewing needle, poke them full of holes with a pushpin, and grab tons of creative loot you could only use as a tiny person!
  • EXPeriment with a variety of gameplay modes like the hardcore Survival mode, the casual No Combat mode, and the tactical No Grinding mode so you can play your way!
  • EXPand your repertoire of surprising powers as you play and slow down time, become invisible or take to the skies and fly!
  • EXPlore unique, hand-crafted areas with absolutely no procedural generation at all! This is 100% artisanal, bespoke, keyboard-to-table game juice from designer Dan Rickmers.

There's currently two issues that would be good to see solved. The first is no mouse sensitivity option, which is a little annoying as the default speed feels a bit too sluggish. The second is with dual monitors, it keeps resetting my resolution at random times to something wider than my actual monitor it's displaying on. I've let them know.

Love the setting and the style of it, once at the very least the mouse sensitivity adjustments are possible it should be pretty interesting. Certainly an original game that's for sure.

You can find Insignificant now on Steam.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

The new trailer for Edgar - Bokbok in Boulzac has me wanting more especially after the great demo

Thursday 10th of October 2019 10:29:31 AM

Tags: Video, Adventure, Point & Click, Upcoming, Indie Game

Edgar - Bokbok in Boulzac from the French team at La Poule Noir is an upcoming comedy point and click adventure coming to Linux, the new trailer is up and continues my excitement for this one.

It's a story rich whimsical adventure, with a protagonist who is a bit…eccentric. The kind where you can see a bit of yourself in them and you can't help but love their weirdness. He loves his chicken, which is amusingly sweet when he calls it "Precious" during dialogue. A dark comic adventure about saving your beloved squash and you stumble upon a "most terrifying secret" during your journey.

Check out the new trailer below that went live yesterday:


Watch video on YouTube.com

More about it:

The action takes place in a small village, reminiscent of the french countryside with its share of cliché and fascinating characters. It is developed by La Poule Noire, a cooperative that aims, through its productions, to make fun of social trends. In Edgar, conspiracy theory is at the heart of the plot.

They've also announced the game will be shown off at EGX in London next week in the Tentacle Zone, so if you're around you should put this on your list to go check out.

If you want to try it, the Linux demo is still up on Steam right now which I recently covered.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Strategy adventure game 'Pathway' has a huge Adventurers Wanted update, plus a note about Linux

Thursday 10th of October 2019 10:11:49 AM

Tags: Adventure, Strategy, Indie Game, Update

Get ready for another adventure as Pathway just got bigger and better with a huge free update now available.

Mixing together node-based travel (think like FTL and Slay the Spire) with random events and turn-based tactical combat, Pathway is a fun game. However, when you've played a lot of hours it can end up perhaps a bit too repetitive. You realise later on the limitations of the game that aren't quite apparent until you really push through it. Now though? Sounds like it's a massive improvement to all areas of the game!

The Adventurers Wanted update adds in…deep breath, are you ready? 18 new combat abilities with new ways to interact with both enemies and allies, reworked skill trees, a "sizeable" amount of new events have been added including many new combat arenas to give it more variety, you no longer stock up on consumables like medkits and instead have a new resource called Supplies which is used across multiple items, new combat modes to adjust how combat begins for more variation, an improved armour system that makes armour give direct damage reduction and the list goes on.

As for Linux support, which Pathway had since release it seems they're quite happy with the Linux community. Speaking on Twitter, one of their artists noted about Robotality not doing Mac again:

Our next game will definitely not have OSX support anymore. Way too much trouble with the system and no/nearly no sales at all. It does just not make sense at all.

In their next post, Linux support got mentioned:

Linux for sure. Also low sales but works way better then OSX and the community is super supportive and helps if something does not work on an obscure distribution. :)

This is why it's important to be polite and useful when reporting issues. Some people constantly underestimate the effect that being nice will have on another human. Good to see from Robotality.

As for Pathway, I still highly recommend it. You can grab Pathway on Humble Store, GOG and Steam.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Valve will bring out 'Remote Play Together' to give online support to local multiplayer games

Thursday 10th of October 2019 08:52:10 AM

Tags: Steam, Teaser, Valve, Upcoming

Update 17/10: Valve confirmed over email that Remote Play Together will work on Linux.

The Steam pipes are leaking over at Valve again, as an upcoming feature called Remote Play Together is coming during the week of October 21.

Valve sent word just to game developers, which they never keep quiet on for very long. Multiple game developers (#1, #2 and so on) ended up putting out posts on Twitter to let everyone know about it a bit earlier than Valve seems to have intended. Here's what it says (from this image):

We're reaching out to let you know about a new feature heading to Steam

Your local multiplayer games will soon be improved with automatic support for Remote Play Together on Steam. Remote Play Together is a new Steam feature that enables two or more players to enjoy local multiplayer games over the internet, together.We think this feature will be very valuable for customers and developers and are excited about the beta. We've provided an FAQ at the bottom of this message which we think addresses most questions and concerns.

All local multiplayer, local co-op and split-screen games will be automatically included in the Remote Play Together beta, which we plan to launch the week of October 21.

While other services have existed for a while to allow local multiplayer titles to be played with your friends across the net, like Parsec which I tested some time ago for a different purpose, having this built into the Steam client is a fantastic idea. Think of all those fantastic local multiplayer titles you could enjoy all over again, without needing to have someone sat right next to you.

Confirming it's true, Valve developer Alden Kroll explained on Twitter in reply to a question about LAN games:

To clarify: it really is only for shared-screen or split-screen games. The tech is streaming your screen to your friend and capturing their input and sending it back to the game, so you are both playing the same game, looking at the same thing.

You can also see more details in this post on the Unity forum, which shows the bits missing from the linked picture and tweets quoted above. So only one person needs to own the game and you invite others to join you. It's really great to see Valve continue to innovate with the Steam client features.

I think I'm going to enjoy this.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Steam Play Proton 4.11-7 is out with more gamepad improvements and other misc fixes

Wednesday 9th of October 2019 09:50:14 PM

Tags: Steam Play, Update

Valve and CodeWeavers have unleashed another update to Steam Play with Proton 4.11-7 releasing today.

Seems they're continuing to try and get gamepads/controllers into a good state, with "Major" improvements to how they handle hotplugging. More games should now see your gamepad when you plug it in after you start it. Additionally, there's improved support for Windows games built with Unity using the Rewired Unity plugin.

They also updated wine-mono which is now at version 4.9.3, this should hopefully improve font rendering and help fix some compatibility issues with Age of Wonders: Planetfall. Kingdom Come: Deliverance got a fix when launching and some VR games might no longer crash too.

Additionally, DXVK was updated to 1.4.2 and D9VK to 0.22 putting them both at the latest available releases.

As usual the latest Proton update will be available in the Steam client shortly if not already. You can find the changelog here.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Become the cleaner for government assassins in 'Nobodies' and destroy all evidence, out now

Wednesday 9th of October 2019 08:44:44 PM

Tags: New Release, Steam, Indie Game, Puzzle, Point & Click

Here's one we missed from the end of last month, it's called Nobodies and you're a government agent tasked with cleaning up after their assassins do their thing. Nobodies—no bodies, get it? Ahem…

Note: Key provided by the developer to our Steam Curator.

A slightly dark point and click puzzler we have here and it's actually pretty good. Surprisingly humorous at the start too, with your training mission involving you disposing of your predecessor. At one point I was just killing off lab rats, I won't spoil how and I know I should feel terrible but I don't. The way the game handles the darkness of it by using humour makes it silly rather than grotesque or morally wrong. That and I just quite clearly shouldn't be playing with chemicals. Where do all these rats keep coming from anyway?

Quite a clever idea combining the hidden object gameplay from other games into something like this. Each mission being an entirely self-contained puzzle, where you need to get rid of a body somehow and make sure everything is where you left it. The answer isn't always obvious either, took some figuring out but an enjoyable experience.

Feature Highlight:

  • Eleven murders to cover up: quick thinking and resourcefulness is essential to succeed in hiding the evidence.
  • Packed with puzzles: each mission has a unique set of challenges to overcome, from classic inventory puzzles, to bespoke mindbending tasks.
  • Multiple ways to solve a challenge: various ways to approach many situations, some more effective than others.
  • Hand-crafted art: almost one hundred distinct hand-drawn scenes to search and explore.
  • Inspired by real events: what if the horrific human experiments of the 50s and 60s got into terrorist hands?

You can find Nobodies on Steam.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

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