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The latest articles from GamingOnLinux
Updated: 3 hours 21 min ago

The team behind SUPERHOT are now helping to fund other indie games

Friday 16th of August 2019 10:36:31 AM

Tags: Misc, Game Dev

A nice story for a Friday morning as the SUPERHOT team have announced SUPERHOT PRESENTS, a fund to help other indie game developers who don't want or need a publisher.

SUPERHOT PRESENTS, a name they jokingly stole from Double Fine Productions (Double Fine Presents) aims to work with developers who need some "finishing (or starting) funds" and they will give some mentoring and advice. They said they just want to "enable a few more properly independent studios exist in the world" which is rather admirable.

With thousands of games releasing every year, times are tough for all developers and it's great to see those more successful reach out and help others. Their ending note was sweet:

We’re still a game development company, we’re working hard on our own games, we just think putting some money back into the industry so more cool things can be made is a nice idea.

The first titles announced are Knuckle Sandwich and The Haunted Island, a Frog Detective Game. If we hear any news about them coming to Linux, we will let you know.

You can see all the details here, just scroll down a bit.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

The first trailer for Commandos 2 - HD Remaster has been released

Friday 16th of August 2019 10:19:09 AM

Tags: Upcoming, Steam, Strategy, Stealth, Video

Commandos 2 - HD Remaster, announced with Linux support back in June now has a first gameplay trailer ahead of Gamescom.

Originally developed by Pyro Studios, it's now being handled by Yippee! Entertainment with Kalypso Media Digital acting as publisher since they acquired the rights back in 2018.

Here's the new footage:


Watch video on YouTube.com

Feature Reminder/Highlight:

  • Re-imagined in HD with reworked controls, modernized UI and an overhauled tutorial.
  • Interactive environments: steal enemy uniforms and weapons, climb poles, swing from cables, swim, utilize vehicles, and climb in/out of buildings, ships and planes.
  • Control nine unique commandos, each with different skills and specializations including green beret, sniper, demolition expert, diver, seductress and thief.
  • The Commandos series’ first appearance in a modern 3D Engine: rotate the environment 360 degrees, move seamlessly in and out of buildings, submarines, planes and underwater, and zoom in and out of the environment.
  • Authentic WWII scenarios: 10 missions spanning 9 different environments in night and day, with realistic weather effects.
  • The choice is yours: how you tackle each mission is up to you. Experiment with skills and weapons in a challenging “against the odds” gameplay style.
  • WWII vehicles and weapons, including jeeps, tanks, trucks, ships, bazookas and flame-throwers.

You can wishlist/follow it on Steam. It's due to release sometime in Q4 later this year.

Since I absolutely adored Commandos, I'm super happy that Commandos 2 HD is coming to Linux. Such a great game, hopefully Yippee! Entertainment will do it justice.

As a reminder, Praetorians HD Remaster (trailer) was also announced at the same time. While Kalypso Media Digital are publishing both, each game has a different developer and only Commandos 2 is coming to Linux.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

The dieselpunk sci-fi RPG INSOMNIA: The Ark due for Linux sometime after the next update

Thursday 15th of August 2019 03:52:44 PM

Tags: Upcoming, Steam, RPG

Mono Studio have given an update on the next major version of the dieselpunk sci-fi RPG INSOMNIA: The Ark, seems like the Linux version is finally getting close.

INSOMNIA is a dieselpunk sci-fi RPG about the slowly degrading remnants of human society attempting to survive on an abandoned space metropolis. Develop your character, explore lovingly handcrafted locations, interact with peculiar NPCs and factions, craft equipment and try to stay alive in this brutal world.

In their news post on Steam, talking about their progress on V1.6. While it's sounding promising, it's not ready yet as they're working through the final set of issues. The good news, is that they mentioned that completing this version, will be "an important step towards Linux and Mac versions of the game".

Really great to see they will eventually deliver on it, although it should be noted how delayed this is. INSOMNIA: The Ark launched in September last year, so next month it will be a year since the release for Windows. This is after the original Kickstarter campaign in 2014 succeeded in raising $92K and their second Kickstarter campaign in 2016 also succeeded raising a further $71K in 2016. Both campaigns clearly stated it will support Linux.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Great looking retro-inspired FPS Ion Fury is out now with Linux support

Thursday 15th of August 2019 02:31:50 PM

Tags: Retro, FPS, New Release, GOG, Steam

Ion Fury (previously Ion Maiden) from Voidpoint and 3D Realms has been officially released, this retro inspired FPS looks fantastic and it comes with full Linux support.

While Shelly “Bombshell” Harrison earned her codename defusing bombs for the Global Defense Force, when evil transhumanist mastermind Dr. Jadus Heskel unleashes the members of his cybernetic cult onto the streets of Neo DC, she knows it’s time to start causing explosions instead of preventing them.


Watch video on YouTube.com

Feature Highlight:

  • The true successor to classic shooters such as Duke Nukem 3D, Shadow Warrior, and Blood.
  • Experience the original BUILD engine on steroids, pumped up and ready to rock again after 20 years!
  • Duck, jump, climb, swim, and blast your way through 7 exciting zones packed with multiple levels of mayhem!
  • A beautiful game world assembled from thousands of hand-crafted textures and sprites
  • An awe-inspiring arsenal of devastating weapons, including multiple ammo types and alternate fire modes. Tri-barreled revolvers, grenade launchers, and heat-seeking smart bombs are your best friends!
  • The classic '90s FPS action you love, meshed with modern inventions like locational damage and seamless level transitions
  • ZERO PROCEDURAL GENERATION. All levels are hand made and full of multiple paths, cool effects, and complex set pieces!
  • Thumping soundtrack comprised of true tracked module music, in authentic FastTracker 2 format
  • Easy access on to level editor and other development tools on day one, plus Steam Workshop support

A review with some actual proper thoughts may come later, as sadly the pre-release build did not include a Linux version.

I've given it a quick blast now that it's out and as expected, it does seem to run very nicely. Love the one-liners, "I spray, you pray!"—hah brings back some memories of ol' Duke that's for sure. Awesome weapons too, a sub-machine gun that sets people on fire, yeah sure why not!

"For the first time in over 20 years, 3D Realms is back at its roots, doing what we’re doing best. Our community has been so patient and excited for Ion Fury," said Frederik Schreiber, VP at 3D Realms. "We are so pleased to bring Ion Fury to our fans so they can experience a fresh take on classic ‘90s destruction for themselves."
 

Even in the short time I've had with the full version today, it's been a blast. I really didn't want to put it down to even write this little bit on it, I'm enjoying it that much. It's also managed to freak me out a little already with some of the enemy designs. Those god damn spider faces—not what I want to see in a dark alleyway. Whoever put that in is a devil!

If fast-paced retro-looking shooters and hunting for keys to open doors sounds like your thing, you can find Ion Fury on GOG and Steam.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Single-player RTS game From Orbit is launching soon with Linux support

Thursday 15th of August 2019 01:26:03 PM

Tags: Indie Game, Unity, Upcoming, Steam, Itch.io

Tentacle Head Games have announced their single-player RTS game From Orbit will launch on August 27th.

Confirming that date will include Linux support on Twitter, From Orbit will see you manage the crew of a small spaceship stranded in deep uncharted space. You will move from planet to planet as you attempt to find your way back home.

It's a little old now but you can see some of what to expect in the below dev video:


Watch video on YouTube.com

It's fun to see more developers try their hand at making a real-time strategy game, especially a small and focused one like this as it looks like it could be a lot of fun. With each game being procedurally generated, probably quite nice to come back for a run often.

Feature Highlight:

  • Permadeath - If your crew does get eaten by aliens, or your ship is destroyed, that's game over.
  • Procedurally generated - Each play through presents you with a uniquely generated region of space full of new planets, each with different benefits and risks.
  • Pick up and play - Sure there are hordes of creatures out to get you, but From Orbit is still accessible to a broad range of players, even if you don't have much experience with RTS games, or find the complexity of mainstream RTS's off-putting. Set your own pace: rush headlong into danger, or set up your defenses and fortify your position.
  • Planetary Environments - Arid deserts, frigid ice worlds, or lush forests... each with unique challenges and obstacles, and each complete with their own set of hostile critters. From Desert Beetles to Ice Worms, every type of creature you encounter has its own strengths and weaknesses that you'll need to adapt to in order to survive.

You can wishlist/follow it on Steam and itch.io.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

FOSS local multiplayer game Superstarfighter sees a great new release

Thursday 15th of August 2019 01:00:50 PM

Tags: Indie Game, Free Game, Open Source, Godot Engine, Update, Arcade

Superstarfighter is a FOSS local multiplayer game made with Godot Engine that continues to impress me and the latest update is out now with more great features.

v0.5.0 released around a week ago adds in a new additional variant to the game modes, to add a snake-like feel where instead of launching bombs at your enemies, you need to get them to fly into your tail to take them out. It's a pretty fun mix-up actually!

The background grid has also seem some updates, to act a little like Geometry Wars. So for example when a bomb blows up, the background gets warped and it actually looks pretty sweet. It's simple but a nice polishing touch to make the game look a little more impressive overall.

If there's one major complaint I have about Superstarfighter right now, it's that it dumps you right into the player picker. It needs a proper main menu, so you can set things up how you want first. Being able to pick what game modes you get and in what order would be nice. I hope they get around to improving that eventually.

Other than the menu issue, it's already a very fun game. I love the Hive game mode where you need to cover the most tiles in your colour:

The game is also now available in French, Italian and Basque in addition to English.

See more on the official site and download from itch.io. I can recommend using itch's open source client, to help keep all your games up to date. You can also find the source on GitHub under the MIT license.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

The Group Stage for Dota 2's The International 2019 starts, as the prize pool continues breaking records

Thursday 15th of August 2019 12:09:13 PM

Tags: MOBA, Steam, Valve, Tournament

The International 2019 is heating up for Dota 2 as The Group Stage has now officially begun and the community-driven prize pool has hit a new record-breaking high.

The Group Stage going on now, with the second day starting around 1AM UTC Friday, is where you have two groups of nine teams and they face off against every other team in a best of two matchup. The top 4 teams advance onto the Upper Bracket of the Main Event, with the teams in 5th-8th place in each group advancing onto the Lower Bracket of the Main Event. The bottom team from each group is then eliminated!

The prize pool is now sitting at $33,031,622 (see here) which is absolutely insane. Previously Epic Games held the record for putting up $30 million for Fortnite's World Cup which came and went in July. Once The International 2019 is over, Valve will then hold the crown for the biggest single prize pool in e-sports history.

What you can get even if you come in 18th place is huge, currently at $82,582 with the top prize now being $15,029,834.

As mentioned before, it's a tidy earner for Valve too since only 25% of Battle Pass purchases go to the Prize Pool with Valve taking the rest.

Find the full schedule for The International 2019 here. You can watch it live on Twitch or SteamTV. You can also watch it directly in Dota 2, to get a little more control over what you see. If you're watching, what team will you be cheering on?

As always, find Dota 2 free to play on Steam.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Facepunch adjust their Linux plans for Rust, refunds being offered as it won't continue at all

Thursday 15th of August 2019 11:41:39 AM

Tags: Unity, Indie Game, Misc, Survival

As an update to the Rust situation, Facepunch have now changed their plans for the Linux version. They've decided to offer refunds, as they won't continue it at all.

Previously, their plan was to split the Linux version of Rust from Windows/Mac to at least give Linux owners a working game although without future feature updates. In the new blog post, written by Facepunch's Garry Newman, they "now realise how shit that would be" after talking to the community.

So they've decided refunds are a better option and to not continue the Linux client at all. However, you probably won't be able to refund it just yet. Newman said that Valve need to do some work first, to adjust the eligibility checking. Also "to guarantee that you'll show up as eligible I'd recommend you run Rust on Linux at least once right now" Newman said.

What are the refund rules for Rust when this comes into force?

  • Should have played at least once on Linux
  • Hours played are irrelevant
  • We don't care if you've played on Windows too

Sometime around September 5th this will happen when they pull the plug, which Newman said another blog post will be up to let you know you can refund it.

On top of that, Newman suggested refunding it even if you think you have your monies worth, so you can "use that money to buy a game from a developer that supports Linux well - this is the best thing you can do to help your community".

As for Steam Play/Proton, they will not work against it however they also have no plans to support it and so it's "unsupported by us and could break at any time".

Newman also confirmed the Linux server will continue as normal, since that's how a lot of Rust servers are deployed.

See the full post about it here.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Survival game Stranded Deep has an absolutely huge update out now

Thursday 15th of August 2019 11:10:37 AM

Tags: Survival, Indie Game, Unity, Early Access, Update

Stranded Deep, the survival game where you're marooned on a desert island after a plane crash just had its first major stable update in some time.

Along with an impressive list of bug fixes, some big new features made it into this release. There's a new intro scene, a new main menu and loading visuals, a female character model with female voice-over, difficulty options when starting a game, stamina, player skills, sprint swimming for moving faster in water, multiple new sharks, multiple new shipwrecks and more. If you've not played for a while, there's a lot to look forward to when jumping into a new game.

I was very impressed with it when I first properly tried it, great to see work on it continuing. The performance is probably what's most surprising about it. A lot of survival games often struggle, but Stranded Deep remains a smooth experience. You can see the full details of what's new in this post.

You can find it on Steam, it's worth checking out.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Time travelling adventure game The Great Perhaps is out now

Wednesday 14th of August 2019 04:31:54 PM

Tags: Adventure, Steam, New Release

Caligari Games and Daedalic Entertainment have today released their time bending adventure game The Great Perhaps and with it comes same-day Linux support as promised.

A very intriguing game this one, since it's both pre and post-apocalypse due to the time travelling mechanics involved. The game tells the story of an astronaut returning to Earth destroyed by natural disasters. While searching amongst the ruins, you find an usual old lantern which has the ability to shine a light into time itself.


Watch video on YouTube.com

Feature Highlight:

  • Use time travel to solve challenging puzzles and unlock the mysteries behind the apocalypse.
  • Experience a world of gripping tension and haunting sorrow before and after the fall.
  • Discover innovative storytelling which binds together past and present.
  • Meet memorable characters with touching personal stories.
  • Original dynamic soundtrack which adapts to each timeline.
  • Wistful hand-drawn 2D art style inspired by Soviet aesthetics and history.

From what I've been told (not one I was supplied a review key for) it's quite a short game between 2-3 hours. GOG have supplied a key today, so I will see what I think and let you know in a future article.

If you're interested you can find it on GOG and Steam now.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Defeat enemies and take their abilities in the roguelike dungeon crawler Emberlight, now available

Wednesday 14th of August 2019 02:35:33 PM

Tags: Steam, Indie Game, RPG, Strategy, Dungeon Crawler

Released on Steam yesterday with same-day Linux support, Emberlight is a dungeon crawler with a bit of a difference. Note: Key provided by the developer.

In most RPGs and dungeon crawlers, you have a set class with specific abilities. That's also true for Emberlight but what makes it a little unique here, is that when enemies unleash abilities on you, they can be yours for the taking after a successful fight. There's a caveat here though, each new ability absorbed can corrupt you…


Watch video on YouTube.com

Co-Founders, William Phelps and Michael Hahn said: "Emberlight provides a unique take on both roguelike and turn-based games. Absorbing abilities from fallen enemies and finding that preferred mix for the player’s styles makes the game easy to learn, but hard to master. Then when it's all said and done, corruption throws a curveball into the mix that messes up all your planning and makes you have to react on the fly."

What happens to a corrupted soul? Well, they become a quest you can pick when starting a run. So when you win a run, all that powering up you did becomes a boss for a future run and so it loops around. Certainly an interesting way to keep players coming back, facing a constant challenge of their own creation.

It's a fully turn-based game with room to room exploration, there's no actual movement involved other than clicking into the next room and dealing with what comes up. So with that in mind, it's basically all about the battles and there's plenty of that.

I like it, overall there's a lot to appreciate with how you can mix and match all the abilities. However, the combat feels sadly a bit lacklustre. The lack of a lot of sound effects and variation in the sound effects lets it down somewhat. The idea that you fight what you used to be is brilliant though, love that. Find it on Steam where it's 15% off until August 20th.

It's also on itch.io but only for Windows at the moment.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Tactics V: "Obsidian Brigade" brings a retro turn-based tactics game to Linux

Wednesday 14th of August 2019 01:57:13 PM

Tags: New Release, Steam, Indie Game, Strategy, RPG, Unity

Retro-style tactical turn-based strategy game Tactics V: "Obsidian Brigade" has recently released with Linux support.

Another new interesting release for you recently, developed by From Nothing Game Studios, Tactics V: "Obsidian Brigade" is inspired by console tactical RPGs from the 1990s like Final Fantasy Tactics.


Watch video on YouTube.com

Feature Highlight:

  • Robust combat system (with many mechanics: facing, targeting styles, actions, delayed actions, reactions)
  • World map navigation.
  • Over 50 hand crafted levels
  • Over 80 scripted scenes/battles
  • Over 25 hours gameplay and new game plus
  • 3 ½ tiers of gear/weaponry
  • 13 unique unlockable classes
  • More than 50 skills (proficiencies, abilities, power casting unlockable)
  • 140+ powers (Elemental magic, close range, Archery, Imbue poisons, etc.)
  • Optional cooperative main-game via assigning troops to another controller during deployment
  • Training option allowing a non-fatal combat to be controlled by player(s) or AI to gain XP and Skill points
  • Optional Alternate top-down perspective available

The developer sent a copy to our Steam Curator, so I gave it a good run and it's not bad.

Some fun ideas and the retro style is actually quite good. However, there's a number of issues that should be addressed. For starters, the interface is absolutely massive and takes up most of the screen when you're giving actions to people, to the point that it's really hard to see anything. This requires constant movement of the camera, just so the UI is out of the way. Having to confirm every single action gets really tedious too. Move, confirm, attack, confirm, pick direction, confirm and so on there's just no flow to it.

If the flow of it and the interface is given a bit of an overhaul then it would be a lot nicer to play. Other than that though, it's quite a good turn-based tactics game. If you're longing for the days of Final Fantasy Tactics, then it might be a good choice for you.

You can find it on Steam.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Dead Cells feature filled Who's the Boss update out now under a new company

Wednesday 14th of August 2019 01:06:01 PM

Tags: Action, Indie Game, Platformer

Some exciting news if you're a big Dead Cells fan like me, as work shall continue on it to expand the game even further under a new dedicated company.

Motion Twin, the original developer is a "workers co-op" and they said this makes growing their team a little difficult. Since they've been prototyping new games, they also wanted to continue working on Dead Cells. So to do exactly that, the company Evil Empire was created. They're all still in the same office, they have the exact same creative control as before but now they have a dedicated team for Dead Cells. Well, that's one way to do it!

As for the recent update to Dead Cells, Update 14: Who's the Boss? was released yesterday and it's a pretty exciting one overall.


Watch video on YouTube.com

Part of their aim with this update, is to help prepare you to face The Hand. So they've introduced a bunch of new monsters, each of them equipped with one of the most deadly or uncharacteristic attacks of their master. On top of that, there's a bunch of new weapons included based on one of the attacks of each boss you encounter, unlocked when you beat that specific boss.

Due to many requests, there's also a new Pan weapon. So now you can slap around monsters with a frying pan because why the hell not? There's also new mutations, a bunch of items and weapons have been rebalanced and a bunch of bugs were smacked around with a pan. Full update notes here.

I only realised today, that if you have an electric weapon it will electrify water. How did I miss that this whole time? Very handy for taking out a few nuisance enemies. The combat in Dead Cells is just so ridiculously satisfying, trying out the Broadsword III+ today it just looks and sounds so powerful:

Absolutely one of my favourite games released for Linux in the last few years. Works great with my Logitech F310 and feels fantastic, sadly I've still been unable to get the Steam Controller to work unless I use the external SC Controller driver/UI.

Want to grab a copy? It's available from Humble Store - GOG - Steam.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

pyLinuxWheel and Oversteer, two open source tools for managing Steering Wheels on Linux

Wednesday 14th of August 2019 12:11:57 PM

Tags: Open Source, Apps

Don't get frustrated by the lack of official support from Logitech for their steering wheels on Linux, reclaim your hardware with these two handy open source tools.

The first, is pyLinuxWheel (GPL). This supports Driving Force Pro, Driving Force GT, G25, G27 and the G29.

A few days ago, pyLinuxWheel had a brand new 0.4 release adding support for alternate modes, a Spanish translation and Driving Force Pro Logitech wheel support.

pyLinuxWheel can be grabbed from the AppImage on the GitLab releases page or itch.io.

If you don't get along with pyLinuxWheel, there's also Oversteer (GPL). This should work with Driving Force/Formula EX, Driving Force Pro, Driving Force GT, Momo Force, Momo Racing Force, Speed Force Wireless, G25, G27, G29 and the G920.

Also seeing a fresh release recently, Oversteer 0.2.3 added a fix for setting the range not working when emulation mode was also being changed.

Oversteer is available for Arch/Manjaro on the AUR or from GitHub.

Both of these support a number of useful features like setting the range you can rotate the wheel, alternate modes like setting the G29 to look and act like a G27, combining pedals and more. They are quite similar, however Oversteer does have a profile saving and loading feature to get quick access to settings you might want stored for specific games.

I'm certainly finding them handy since I own a G29 which really does make racing games much more interesting. In my own testing, both work really well! I haven't actually had an issue with either of them and I'm a little torn on which one to keep so I have them both. Would be interesting to see them combine their efforts though to progress further, as they're both doing almost the same thing.

Really great to see more like this, hopefully these applications will help more of you enjoy your hardware on Linux enabling you to easily change some settings and get driving.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

SNES-styled RPG made by Janitors, Kingdoms of the Dump has managed to get funded on Kickstarter

Wednesday 14th of August 2019 11:17:14 AM

Tags: Godot Engine, RPG, Crowdfunding, Upcoming, Indie Game

With only a few hours left to go, Kingdoms of the Dump a SNES-styled RPG which is being made in the FOSS game engine Godot Engine by a team which includes some real-life Janitors has reached over the funding goal.

Launched on Kickstarter on July 15th with a goal of $60,000 they've done really well hitting over $73,000!


Watch video on YouTube.com

It really does look and sound excellent, especially how they're doing the movement and exploration. Giving the the freedom to jump on top of ledges and enemies, no random little rocks blocking your path. This should lead to some very interesting level design. Let's hope it doesn't turn out to be…rubbish—I couldn't help myself!

Feature Highlight:

  • A narrative based game with a quick moving story and interesting world 
  • Jumping, climbing and other on-field skills to add to exploration and navigation
  • No random encounters
  • Turn based combat with a tileboard grid encouraging placement and movement 
  • Timed hits! (Press a key during the peak of attack animation for a critical strike)
  • Quickly toggle between main characters to make use of their field moves
  • A large Mode-7 inspired World Map. (Travel by land, sea, and air)
  • SNES-inspired visual aesthetic with detailed environments and expressive sprites.

As a reminder, the actual release is quite some ways off, as they said on their campaign they're planning at least a two year development time. Nice to see a developer not underestimate the time it takes, so there shouldn't be any disappointment with the release date at least.

Find it on Kickstarter.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

The dev of Assault Android Cactus is working on Unpacking, a zen puzzle game

Wednesday 14th of August 2019 10:53:16 AM

Tags: Indie Game, Steam, Upcoming, Puzzle, Casual

Witch Beam, known for the awesome twin-stick shooter Assault Android Cactus is going to bring us something a little calmer with their next game: Unpacking.

Unlike real-life moving, stuffing your life into boxes and then unpacking everything again, Unpacking is supposed to be a little more relaxing. They say it's like "item Tetris" mixed with home decoration "while learning clues about the life you’re unpacking".

Inspired by real-life unpacking, they started prototyping in early 2018 and in May that year it was selected for the Stugan game accelerator program. For those unfamiliar, Stugan is a non-profit for game developers allowing them to spend two months in a cabin dedicated to the game, which allowed the developers to really get down to it. Since then Unpacking went on to go viral on Twitter and they've shown it off at various events with it now in full-time production.

Feature Highlight:

  • Unpack a home -- from a single bedroom to an entire house
  • Meditative gameplay with no timers, meters or score
  • Explore domestic environments with all their nooks and crannies while you stack plates, hang towels, and arrange bookshelves
  • Discover a character's story through the items that come with her to each new home (and the items that get left behind)
  • Soundtrack by BAFTA award-winning composer and audio director Jeff van Dyck

You can now wishlist and follow it since the Steam page just recently went live. It's confirmed to be coming to Linux, as noted in the system requirements on Steam and their press page clearly notes it too.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

The Dreamcast emulator Flycast has made some amazing progress lately

Wednesday 14th of August 2019 10:29:46 AM

Tags: Emulation, Open Source, Update

In a post on the official Libretro website, the team notes that open source Dreamcast emulation with Flycast (a fork of Reicast) has progress along tremendously.

Thanks to all the work that has gone into it, you will no longer need an external Dreamcast BIOS which is a pretty big milestone for such an emulator and will make it a lot easier to setup and use with the RetroArch front-end.

Flyinghead, the main person working on Flycast plans to merge the regular and Windows CE versions into one version making things even easier to play with. They said that lots of the work done for the Windows CE version will benefit all of the games run through it.

To sum up what Flycast is able to do they mention it can run Sega Naomi games, Windows CE games, no limitations on savestates and internal resolutions, actual modem support, built-in zero configuration online multiplayer support, 32bit and 64bit support for x86 and ARM.

They ended it by noting that "real CD-ROM support" may even come soon, to run "CD-R based backup discs".

You can read the full post here.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Korean survival horror-adventure The Coma 2: Vicious Sisters announced with Linux support

Wednesday 14th of August 2019 10:08:19 AM

Tags: Indie Game, Steam, Upcoming, Horror, Survival, Adventure

After recently releasing Vambrace: Cold Soul, Devespresso Games are going back to horror with The Coma 2: Vicious Sisters.

The Coma 2: Vicious Sisters is an atmospheric, story-driven game. Immerse yourself in the warped Sehwa district as you encounter an engaging cast of characters, solve puzzles, discover revealing clues, and fight for survival against a relentless psycho.

Only recently announced by the South Korean studio, it seems they will be continuing to support Linux too like with The Coma: Recut (it has a slight delay for Linux originally) and same-day support with Vambrace: Cold Soul. The Coma 2: Vicious Sisters is already confirmed for Linux, so with that in mind check out the first official trailer:


Watch video on YouTube.com

Feature Highlight:

  • Fear Dark Song’s relentless pursuit to kill you, now with an all-new AI.
  • Craft items to prepare for critical life-or-death situations or risk permanent injury.
  • Explore the nightmarish district of Sehwa and discover its dark secrets.
  • Scavenge resources to survive deadly encounters and afflictions.
  • Unlock tools and upgrades to reach previously inaccessible areas.
  • Hide to avoid detection and certain death. Pass challenges to conceal your location.
  • Featuring vibrant, hand-illustrated in-game visuals and comic strips.

There's no current release date set for it, so we will let you know whenever they publish one. Their Steam page is simply saying it will be sometime in "Q4 2019".

You can wishlist and follow it on Steam.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Roll dice, swap around cards and kick butt in Dicey Dungeons, out now

Tuesday 13th of August 2019 07:12:27 PM

Tags: Card Game, Strategy, Roguelike, Itch.io, Steam, New Release, Review

Dicey Dungeons is a lighthearted deck-building roguelike, where you're a massive walking die and it's available today with Linux support.

Made by Terry Cavanagh (VVVVVV, Super Hexagon), Chipzel, Marlowe Dobbe and Justo Delgado Baudí, this new team have managed to created something extremely unique with Dicey Dungeons.


Watch video on YouTube.com

I've actually owned it personally for some time now, after picking it up during the Alpha on itch.io I was instantly in love with it. Deck-builders are becoming steadily more popular again but Dicey Dungeons is different. You have your cards which you can swap around, sure enough, but there's no messing about with needing some sort of mana. Instead, you roll dice to activate these cards and what they do depends on the number you roll and place into their slot. It's brilliant!

Feature Highlight

  • Six wildly different playable classes: Warrior, Thief, Robot, Jester, Inventor and Witch.
  • Dozens of enemies, ranging from Vacuum Cleaners that want to suck your blood, to creatures from Irish mythology, to suave malevolent snowmen.
  • A catchy, upbeat and energetic soundtrack by Chipzel (previously, the musician from Super Hexagon).
  • Beautiful and adorable artwork by Marlowe Dobbe.
  • Procedurally generated for endless play-throughs.

I've somehow managed to sink 26 hours into Dicey Dungeons, I'm not even sure how. It's as if my hand has a mind of its own, moving the mouse on over to play just one more run. It helps that it's not a complicated game, as they've managed to balance the time and fun factor together to make it accessible and streamlined so you can blast through an hour and come back easily the next day for another go.

What they've managed to do with the simplicity of it is exceptional too. While your dice are used to activate your cards, you can also directly attack dice as well. You can set them on fire, costing HP to put them out and use them. The cards themselves can be messed with too, you can have them shocked requiring a die to unlock them, there's so many little touches and features making it seriously fun.

Never has a recommendation been easier. Go get it.

Find it on itch.io and Steam. If you want the soundtrack by itself, it's also available here.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Be ready for a party with the new Humble Jackbox Party Bundle 2019

Tuesday 13th of August 2019 06:21:40 PM

Tags: Game Bundle, Humble Store

Having people over and fancy a laugh? The Humble Jackbox Party Bundle 2019 just recently went live and has some good picks for you.

Inside the bundle you will find games like:

  • Drawful 2
  • Quiplash
  • Fibbage XL
  • The Jackbox Party Pack
  • The Jackbox Party Pack 2
  • The Jackbox Party Pack 3
  • The Jackbox Party Pack 4

All of those have Linux support. There are a few older standalones which don't support Linux but for what they do have it's a good deal.

Jackbox Games actually did something that I don't usually expect, they went back and ported most of their semi-recent titles to Linux as well as their newest, so they're worth your time.

Check out the full bundle here.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com

More in Tux Machines

LWN: Spectre, Linux and Debian Development

  • Grand Schemozzle: Spectre continues to haunt

    The Spectre v1 hardware vulnerability is often characterized as allowing array bounds checks to be bypassed via speculative execution. While that is true, it is not the full extent of the shenanigans allowed by this particular class of vulnerabilities. For a demonstration of that fact, one need look no further than the "SWAPGS vulnerability" known as CVE-2019-1125 to the wider world or as "Grand Schemozzle" to the select group of developers who addressed it in the Linux kernel. Segments are mostly an architectural relic from the earliest days of x86; to a great extent, they did not survive into the 64-bit era. That said, a few segments still exist for specific tasks; these include FS and GS. The most common use for GS in current Linux systems is for thread-local or CPU-local storage; in the kernel, the GS segment points into the per-CPU data area. User space is allowed to make its own use of GS; the arch_prctl() system call can be used to change its value. As one might expect, the kernel needs to take care to use its own GS pointer rather than something that user space came up with. The x86 architecture obligingly provides an instruction, SWAPGS, to make that relatively easy. On entry into the kernel, a SWAPGS instruction will exchange the current GS segment pointer with a known value (which is kept in a model-specific register); executing SWAPGS again before returning to user space will restore the user-space value. Some carefully placed SWAPGS instructions will thus prevent the kernel from ever running with anything other than its own GS pointer. Or so one would think.

  • Long-term get_user_pages() and truncate(): solved at last?

    Technologies like RDMA benefit from the ability to map file-backed pages into memory. This benefit extends to persistent-memory devices, where the backing store for the file can be mapped directly without the need to go through the kernel's page cache. There is a fundamental conflict, though, between mapping a file's backing store directly and letting the filesystem code modify that file's on-disk layout, especially when the mapping is held in place for a long time (as RDMA is wont to do). The problem seems intractable, but there may yet be a solution in the form of this patch set (marked "V1,000,002") from Ira Weiny. The problems raised by the intersection of mapping a file (via get_user_pages()), persistent memory, and layout changes by the filesystem were the topic of a contentious session at the 2019 Linux Storage, Filesystem, and Memory-Management Summit. The core question can be reduced to this: what should happen if one process calls truncate() while another has an active get_user_pages() mapping that pins some or all of that file's pages? If the filesystem actually truncates the file while leaving the pages mapped, data corruption will certainly ensue. The options discussed in the session were to either fail the truncate() call or to revoke the mapping, causing the process that mapped the pages to receive a SIGBUS signal if it tries to access them afterward. There were passionate proponents for both options, and no conclusion was reached. Weiny's new patch set resolves the question by causing an operation like truncate() to fail if long-term mappings exist on the file in question. But it also requires user space to jump through some hoops before such mappings can be created in the first place. This approach comes from the conclusion that, in the real world, there is no rational use case where somebody might want to truncate a file that has been pinned into place for use with RDMA, so there is no reason to make that operation work. There is ample reason, though, for preventing filesystem corruption and for informing an application that gets into such a situation that it has done something wrong.

  • Hardening the "file" utility for Debian

    In addition, he had already encountered problems with file running in environments with non-standard libraries that were loaded using the LD_PRELOAD environment variable. Those libraries can (and do) make system calls that the regular file binary does not make; the system calls were disallowed by the seccomp() filter. Building a Debian package often uses FakeRoot (or fakeroot) to run commands in a way that appears that they have root privileges for filesystem operations—without actually granting any extra privileges. That is done so that tarballs and the like can be created containing files with owners other than the user ID running the Debian packaging tools, for example. Fakeroot maintains a mapping of the "changes" made to owners, groups, and permissions for files so that it can report those to other tools that access them. It does so by interposing a library ahead of the GNU C library (glibc) to intercept file operations. In order to do its job, fakeroot spawns a daemon (faked) that is used to maintain the state of the changes that programs make inside of the fakeroot. The libfakeroot library that is loaded with LD_PRELOAD will then communicate to the daemon via either System V (sysv) interprocess communication (IPC) calls or by using TCP/IP. Biedl referred to a bug report in his message, where Helmut Grohne had reported a problem with running file inside a fakeroot.

Flameshot is a brilliant screenshot tool for Linux

The default screenshot tool in Ubuntu is alright for basic snips but if you want a really good one you need to install a third-party screenshot app. Shutter is probably my favorite, but I decided to give Flameshot a try. Packages are available for various distributions including Ubuntu, Arch, openSuse and Debian. You find installation instructions on the official project website. Read more

Android Leftovers

IBM/Red Hat and Intel Leftovers

  • Troubleshooting Red Hat OpenShift applications with throwaway containers

    Imagine this scenario: Your cool microservice works fine from your local machine but fails when deployed into your Red Hat OpenShift cluster. You cannot see anything wrong with the code or anything wrong in your services, configuration maps, secrets, and other resources. But, you know something is not right. How do you look at things from the same perspective as your containerized application? How do you compare the runtime environment from your local application with the one from your container? If you performed your due diligence, you wrote unit tests. There are no hard-coded configurations or hidden assumptions about the runtime environment. The cause should be related to the configuration your application receives inside OpenShift. Is it time to run your app under a step-by-step debugger or add tons of logging statements to your code? We’ll show how two features of the OpenShift command-line client can help: the oc run and oc debug commands.

  • What piece of advice had the greatest impact on your career?

    I love learning the what, why, and how of new open source projects, especially when they gain popularity in the DevOps space. Classification as a "DevOps technology" tends to mean scalable, collaborative systems that go across a broad range of challenges—from message bus to monitoring and back again. There is always something new to explore, install, spin up, and explore.

  • How DevOps is like auto racing

    When I talk about desired outcomes or answer a question about where to get started with any part of a DevOps initiative, I like to mention NASCAR or Formula 1 racing. Crew chiefs for these race teams have a goal: finish in the best place possible with the resources available while overcoming the adversity thrown at you. If the team feels capable, the goal gets moved up a series of levels to holding a trophy at the end of the race. To achieve their goals, race teams don’t think from start to finish; they flip the table to look at the race from the end goal to the beginning. They set a goal, a stretch goal, and then work backward from that goal to determine how to get there. Work is delegated to team members to push toward the objectives that will get the team to the desired outcome. [...] Race teams practice pit stops all week before the race. They do weight training and cardio programs to stay physically ready for the grueling conditions of race day. They are continually collaborating to address any issue that comes up. Software teams should also practice software releases often. If safety systems are in place and practice runs have been going well, they can release to production more frequently. Speed makes things safer in this mindset. It’s not about doing the “right” thing; it’s about addressing as many blockers to the desired outcome (goal) as possible and then collaborating and adjusting based on the real-time feedback that’s observed. Expecting anomalies and working to improve quality and minimize the impact of those anomalies is the expectation of everyone in a DevOps world.

  • Deep Learning Reference Stack v4.0 Now Available

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) continues to represent one of the biggest transformations underway, promising to impact everything from the devices we use to cloud technologies, and reshape infrastructure, even entire industries. Intel is committed to advancing the Deep Learning (DL) workloads that power AI by accelerating enterprise and ecosystem development. From our extensive work developing AI solutions, Intel understands how complex it is to create and deploy applications for deep learning workloads. That?s why we developed an integrated Deep Learning Reference Stack, optimized for Intel Xeon Scalable processor and released the companion Data Analytics Reference Stack. Today, we?re proud to announce the next Deep Learning Reference Stack release, incorporating customer feedback and delivering an enhanced user experience with support for expanded use cases.

  • Clear Linux Releases Deep Learning Reference Stack 4.0 For Better AI Performance

    Intel's Clear Linux team on Wednesday announced their Deep Learning Reference Stack 4.0 during the Linux Foundation's Open-Source Summit North America event taking place in San Diego. Clear Linux's Deep Learning Reference Stack continues to be engineered for showing off the most features and maximum performance for those interested in AI / deep learning and running on Intel Xeon Scalable CPUs. This optimized stack allows developers to more easily get going with a tuned deep learning stack that should already be offering near optimal performance.