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Updated: 1 hour 30 min ago

RimWorld gets a big 1.2 update out with lots more options to tweak your game

Tuesday 11th of August 2020 10:57:44 AM

The brilliant colony-building sim RimWorld has another mega post-release update available now, with content included for both the base game and the Royalty expansion.

Looking over the changelog, which is as long as expected, it sounds excellent. RimWorld has gained a whole new way to tweak your experience with a "custom playstyle system", which allows you to adjust a large number of settings to how you want your game to be. So you could make it a lot easier and more of a building sim and less of a "oh my god everyone is going to die from raiders" sim. There's also a bunch of new visual effects and many new sound effects added in for free too. There's loads more, especially for the Royalty DLC like an entirely new major quest that involves defending a damaged shuttle or assaulting a bandit camp.

You can get an overview of what's new and improved below:


Watch video on YouTube.com

RimWorld is easily one of the best games available on Linux, in fact I would say it's one of the best games as a whole across Linux, macOS and Windows. Every time you play will be different, thanks to the AI story generation systems and now even more so with the new options you can tweak to your liking. So much can happen in a game it's absolutely crazy. We're going to need to take another look during a few livestreams sometime soon, so be sure to follow us on Twitch.

Don't own it? You can pick up RimWorld from Humble Store, GOG and Steam.

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Check out the new trailer and demo for the sci-fi puzzle platformer Transmogrify

Tuesday 11th of August 2020 10:37:09 AM

Your facility appears to be overrun by strange creatures, with a forgetful research AI trying to help you escape but you do at least have a gun that can turn creatures into useful objects. This is Transmogrify, an upcoming sci-fi platformer that was partly funded on Kickstarter a few years back.

It's closing in on release and it's starting to look really sweet. The idea of needing to transform creatures to help you get through levels isn't unique but it does have a nice twist on it. The developer, Odyssey Entertainment, emailed out to mention they have a new trailer which you can see below:


Watch video on YouTube.com

Feature Highlight:

  • Transmogrify strange creatures to solve puzzles and help you advance
  • Challenging and tight platforming
  • Art style that is a perfect blend of creepy and cute
  • Fly, push, grab, rocket jump, and glide: powerups allow you to decide how to move through levels
  • Over 75 unique levels across 4 different worlds

Want to try it out for yourself? Their shiny new official site is up with a brand new demo too. It's also another game built with the free, open source and cross-platform Godot Engine.

You can follow it on Steam. Their current plan is to release in full later this year.

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There's going to be an online Linux App Summit this November

Tuesday 11th of August 2020 09:54:07 AM

Are you interested in helping to make Linux a great end-user platform? Or perhaps you just want to listen to speeches and find out more info from those working on it? Mark November 12-14 on your calendar.

This is the date of the upcoming 2020 Linux App Summit, an event co-hosted by GNOME and KDE as they work to bring everyone together to push Linux further. LAS will have a range of different talks, panels, and Q&As on a wide range of topics covering everything: creating, packaging, and distributing apps, to monetization within the Linux ecosystem and much more.

Recently they announced that the call for Talks is now open, so you can submit your ideas by September 15. They're encouraging new speakers, so you don't need to have done lots before. If you have a good idea, you should go for it and they have some suggested topics too like growing the ecosystem, platform diversity (technology speaking like helping to enabling cross-platform distribution), innovation and more.

Picked speakers will be announced on October 1.

We shall hopefully follow the event along to report on anything interesting in November. They also appear to be looking for sponsors to come up.

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Competitive platform-jumper 'Jumpala' reveals new character, getting a free version

Tuesday 11th of August 2020 09:38:21 AM

Jumpala is an upcoming fast-paced competitive platformer that sees you constantly hopping across tiny little pads, it's actually brilliant fun and they've done a few new reveals recently.

When you think about platformers, traditionally this would mean running along different floors, a little tricky jumping here and there and perhaps various enemy encounters. Jumpala is none of that. Instead, the whole arena scrolls upwards with small platforms each player needs to jump across, to turn it into their colour before it drops of the screen. It's highly competitive and from the early builds we played—a huge amount of fun.

The latest character reveal is Dr. Time, who can slow down time to escape danger and beat others to items and their ultimate ability entirely stops time so you can do as you wish. Have a look:


Watch video on YouTube.com

Does the game seem a little familiar? It's inspired by the classic Spryjinx, a classic from the DOS era.

Feature Highlight:

  • 4-player competitive action. Compete with your friends in fast-paced free for alls, or team up in 2v2 matches. No friends? Go up against challenging CPUs, or compete against others in online 1v1s.
  • Easy to learn, tough to master. If you want to be the best, you'll have to plan your routes, practice your timing, and perfect your positioning—all while being mindful of your opponents.
  • A wide variety of stages. Each stage has unique features and hazards to watch out for.
  • Original set of characters. Each character has their own unique abilities and playstyle.

You can check it out right now on the itch.io demo or buy the main version on itch.io (not finished though, Early Access). The game is also heading to Steam later this year, and there's a demo there too.

Additionally, the developer is planning to release Jumpala: Tryouts Edition (Steam) as a free version on August 20. This should eventually replace the demo as a cut-down version, although with support for online play for people to be able to get into it.

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Vibrant twin-stick slasher 'Breakpoint' gives you exploding weapons

Tuesday 11th of August 2020 09:18:53 AM

Enjoy some classic fast-paced vibrant arcade-style action? Breakpoint looks like it's worthy of some attention for putting a nice unique spin on it.

With bright neon graphics, they mixed in elements from the classic arcade games with "modern sensibilities". It's a top-down highscore chaser with melee weapons that…explode? Yes. No ranged attacks, no laser weapons, no pew-pew-pew. Instead you slice, crush, and blast your way through the swarm and when you push your weapons to their breaking point (it's called Breakpoint—get it?), they unleash a big explosion.


Watch video on YouTube.com

This actually looks like a genuinely fun take on all the classics, I for one am looking forward to giving this a go. Will swapping lasers for exploding melee weapons help me hit the high score? Not likely, I'm pretty terrible at these types of games but it looks like you can go out in a blaze of bright glory here.

When querying Linux support on Steam after noticing Linux being added to the system requirements, the developer replied to confirm it's launching for Linux.

You can follow Breakpoint on Steam.

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Steelbreakers turns the feel of classic Zelda into local multiplayer action

Tuesday 11th of August 2020 09:04:43 AM

Currently in development with a demo now available, Steelbreakers takes the basic look and mechanical feel of classic Zelda and turns it into a competitive local multiplayer battle arena.

The developer mentioned their idea with it was to make a game they wanted to play that they felt didn't exist already. As they said they "always wanted to play a Zelda game that demanded technical skill and would let you fight with your friends on a top-down 2d playing field" and so Steelbreakers was created.

Together up to four players can fight for dominance in small arenas with traps and all sorts. At release, the developer is planning to have online play, additional game modes, plenty of maps and weapons, AI enemies and the list goes on. The demo is just a small slice of what to expect.

After playing a bunch of it, we got a little bit hooked over here at the GOL office. The basics are already pretty great and it works wonderfully on Linux with it being built with cross-platform MonoGame. We've played absolutely tons of local multiplayer action games but Steelbreakers certainly has a unique feel to it thanks to the inspiration.

While they "gauge interest" in this new game, they're going to be using what they learned to improve their previous game Sol Standard, a PvP turn-based tactics game that also supports Linux. After that, they plan to return to Steelbreakers to "add a whole bunch of new content".

You can find it and grab the demo on itch.io. Do let the developer know what you think.

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Party game 'Drink More Glurp' is an absolute barrel of laughs - out now

Monday 10th of August 2020 07:00:56 PM

Drink More Glurp, a party game that thoroughly parodies sporting events like the Olympic Games and also pokes fun at sponsorship systems is out now. Note: key provided by the developer.

Set on an alien world where the inhabitants attempted to copy our sporty games, however they got everything just a little bit wrong which has resulted in a serious of ridiculous contests with completely mental physics. This might be the funniest party game I've played all year. After trying the original demo during the Steam Game Festival, I was hooked.


Watch video on YouTube.com

What's so great about Drink More Glurp is how easy it is to get into and start laughing. You just spin the gamepad sticks around with each controlling an arm, flail about for a while and hope for the best.

I honestly can't stop smiling every single time I load it up. Like any game though, with enough practice you can become pretty good at it and eventually you start learning a few tricks—not me though. Winning isn't the point with Drink More Glurp, most of the time that's a happy accident you can quite literally fall into. Enjoy this video of an 8 year old destroying what I thought initially was quite a good throw considering my own complete lack of coordination (I'm LM with a score of 17.29…):

 

Feature Highlight:

  • Local multiplayer Party Mode from 2-20 Players
  • Thousands of possible event and sponsor combinations
  • A new competition each time you play
  • Single player Challenge Mode with online leaderboards and replays
  • Silly physics

Don't have people over often? There's single-player too! That's another part that I enjoy with it. A great party game it is, as you can sit around and laugh at the failure shown all around you. However, the single-player challenge mode is equally a good time when you're alone and there's plenty of these challenges with lots of variety to keep you going for hours. Plus, the online leaderboard system along with replays is a seriously fantastic touch. You can watch how others do it but that doesn't mean you're going to be able to replicate their amazing score.

Good family friendly fun that makes you really thirsty for a nice cold can of Glurp, it's just so completely stupid you have to love it. Something you need to be aware of though is that due to the control scheme, you need a gamepad to play. Since it's a hot-seat game, you only need one pad that you throw around to each player when its their turn.

You can buy Drink More Glurp on Steam and you should because it's awesome.

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Challenging co-op dungeon crawler 'Barony' gets Linux Steam and Epic Store crossplay

Monday 10th of August 2020 03:41:51 PM

Recently, the first-person dungeon crawling roguelike Barony had a bit of an upgrade along with a release on the Epic Store and that came with crossplay.

"Barony is the premier first-person roguelike RPG with cooperative play. Cryptic items, brutal traps and devious monsters, like those found in classic roguelikes and CRPGs, await you. Conquer the dungeon alone, or gather a perfect party in co-op with iconic and exotic RPG classes."

The problem was, the Linux version on Steam did not have the Steam -> Epic Store crossplay feature. I mentioned this to the developer, while pointing out that the Epic Online Services actually does have Linux support (it's just the store that doesn't). A few days later and another update went out to enable it. Really great to see Linux nicely supported there by Turning Wheel LLC. Now anyone on Steam/Linux can easily play with friends who picked it up on the Epic Store.

To enable it, go into the Settings and to the Misc menu, it's at the bottom:

I've tested it myself and it works perfectly.

If, like me, you found Barony a little difficult to get into, the last update added in a nice Hall of Trials mode to get you started on learning it all which you can see again below:


Watch video on YouTube.com

You can find Barony on Humble Store, Steam and GOG. Barony's code is open source too on GitHub but you still need a copy to play with it for the data.

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Get ready to beat 'em up as 9 Monkeys of Shaolin releases in October

Monday 10th of August 2020 03:04:50 PM

9 Monkeys of Shaolin is an upcoming beat 'em up from Sobaka Studio, what they claim will mark the "true rebirth of the iconic beat 'em up genre in vein of old-school video games".

We've been waiting on this for quite some time now after being announced back in 2018. They've now confirmed it will see a release on October 16. Check out the brand new trailer:


Watch video on YouTube.com

When speaking to the developer initially on Twitter, they mentioned that the date should include Linux too but they would be making a special update on it later. However, a few days later they reached out to us at GOL directly to chat about it and go through more details. After a chat and some initial testing done, they mentioned to us they can say it will "definitely" release on Linux. I can also tell you the combat felt really good but not much more than that for now.

Feature Highlight:

  • 3 unique fighting styles: fight on earth, in the air or use mysterious magic seals. Combine these elements to defeat every enemy on your way.
  • Captivating narrative: discover the fascinating story of Wei Cheng and follow him as he rises from a simple fisherman to the master of Shaolin martial arts.
  • Stunning visual style: unlikely combination of historical and mystical elements gives you an exciting experience from every scene appears on screen.
  • Extensive character development system: you learn a great deal of ways to victory as you discover various unlockable perks, items and fighting styles.
  • More than 25 different levels: Chinese villages, pirate ship, Buddhist monasteries, Japanese mansions, ancient ruins and many more.
  • 10 types of Chinese and Japanese polearms, each with its unique traits. Discover the landscapes to find new items!
  • Co-op play: invite your friend to help you fight through growing waves of enemies and complete the game together.

You can follow it on Steam.

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NVIDIA GeForce are teasing something for August 31, likely RTX 3000

Monday 10th of August 2020 02:47:29 PM

Ready for your next upgrade? NVIDIA think you might be and they're teasing what is most likely the GeForce RTX 3000 launch at the end of this month.

We don't know what they're actually going to call them, although they will be based on the already revealed Ampere architecture announced back in May. It's probably safe to say RTX 3000 for now, going by the last two generations being 1000 and 2000 but NVIDIA may go for something more fancy this time.

So what's going on? On Twitter, the official NVIDIA GeForce account tweeted the hashtag "UltimateCountdown" along with an 8 second teaser with some sort of sci-fi space explosion and the sound of a ticking clock. Additionally, their Twitter header image is now this:

Their first GeForce release was on August 31, 1999 - so it's pretty clear what's going to come on August 31, 2020 don't you think? Would be weird if it wasn't. Wccftech actually managed to grab some info from secret sources, that gave a roadmap of their planned releases and it seems they will launch in September.

We've put it on our calendar to keep an eye on.

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The 'Tiny Teams Festival' on Steam shines a light on micro studios

Monday 10th of August 2020 02:30:34 PM

Tiny Teams Festival, a little sale and event page went live on Steam recently to showcase a bunch of micro-teams and their games and there's a few fun picks there.

Run by Yogscast Games, a YouTube / Twitch group that have turned to publishing indie games. So you could compare this little Steam event to other publisher-focused sales although this includes plenty not published by Yogscast. It's interesting for us, because smaller teams are what make up a large majority of games supported on Linux. They're the ones who most need our support too and so it's nice to highlight some good stuff they make.

Some of the Linux games out now which are worthy of you purchases include:

It's also a nice reminder of a few upcoming games which have demos like:

See the full event page on Steam. The event runs until August 15.

With the The Last Cube, I actually missed the demo during the Summer Steam Game Festival, so that was a nice reminder of a rather atmospheric upcoming puzzle game that's worth a go.

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Neverwinter Nights: Enhanced Edition gets more graphical upgrades

Monday 10th of August 2020 12:46:17 PM

Beamdog are really starting to put the Enhanced into Neverwinter Nights: Enhanced Edition and showing just how much they care about the classic RPG experiences as a studio.

A fresh development build for Neverwinter Nights: Enhanced Edition went up recently with a brand new Lighting Engine and the difference it makes is quite ridiculous. They said their aim with this is to "allow much higher quality future content, but also in large to enhance the visual quality of existing content" and since pictures say more than a thousand words they showed quite a few examples. Here's one to save you a quick click:

Left old / Right new. See a bigger comparison on this dedicated page.

What the feature will come with:

  • Physically based rendering (PBR), with emulation of specular reflection, surface “roughness”, Fresnel-effects and gamma correction. All in all, this gives a more realistic and “natural” look.
  • Tone mapping that prevents color distortion of bright lights and enables overbright.
  • Per-pixel lighting rather than per-vertex of the old setup, yielding much more precise light illumination levels relative to distance.
  • Full dynamic lighting, supporting up to 32 dynamic lights (previously NWN effectively only supported 6).

Plus, it is of course fully optional. It's heavier on GPUs, so you can tweak it and turn it off.

Additionally, Water Rendering also had something of an overhaul in the same way. With full configuration and the ability to turn it off: water now renders full dynamic light reflections, including sun and moon. Water will also show wave displacement based on area wide and local wind sources (such as explosions) much more realistically than the previous water did. They put up some comparison shots again but here's one below to save a click again:

 

Left old / Right new. See a bigger comparison on this dedicated page.

Even more is coming like improved Grass Rendering, which is sorted by distance and they fixed transparency issues so it looks denser and more natural. Grass Rendering was also "heavily" optimised. Pathfinding has also be drastically improved, so you should no longer get stuck on random objects. There's also tons of modding improvements with more access to the internals like the SQLite databases for various parts of the game and plenty more of the game has been put into scripting so it's no longer hard-coded like walking animations.

Beamdog said they intend for this all to go live "in the coming weeks". You can see the full breakdown of everything coming to the next build here. Sounds like some really amazing stuff.

You can pick up Neverwinter Nights: Enhanced Edition from GOG and Steam.

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Upcoming 'post-cyberpunk' RTS NeuroSlicers looks great, Steam page up

Monday 10th of August 2020 10:51:59 AM

NeuroSlicers is an upcoming in-development real-time strategy game that aims to 'modernize' the genre with a 'post-cyberpunk' setting and it's looking slick.

"Instead of seeing how fast you can click, NeuroSlicers tasks you with how fast you can think. Using intelligent AI-powered units, you are free to make more significant, more strategic decisions that focus on territory control, resource management, upgrading and careful placement of customizable buildings, units and powerful function abilities called Scripts."

It's been quite a long time since we last covered it, while also keeping an eye on their progress. They've now announced that their Steam page has finally gone live as they continue their very early testing period. While this 'pre-alpha' is currently limited to supporting Windows, they confirmed to GOL on Twitter that a Linux release continues to be planned.

Planned features:

  • An ongoing narrative that will continue to evolve post-launch
  • Real-time strategic gameplay that focuses on macro over micro
  • eSports ready Competitive PVP with all abilities unlocked, for truly balanced gameplay
  • Narrative campaign that combines Solo, Co-Op and PVPVE gameplay
  • A refreshing take on the RTS genre that offers a unique experience while maintaining the fundamentals of fast-paced, highly strategic gameplay.
  • Free-form gameplay allowing for true customization of the units, buildings and powers you take into battle
  • Competitive ranking in PVP and an ‘Escalation’ system in all other game modes that progresses difficulty alongside your play.
  • Fully voiced, diverse cast of NPCs to build relationships with, each with their set of systems, goals and opportunities to offer.

Want a proper look at it? See their recent livestream below:


Watch video on YouTube.com

Now that the Steam page is live, you can go ahead and wishlist / follow it along to release. We will of course let you know of any major developments too.

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Darkest Dungeon - The Butcher's Circus due for Linux 'in the next week or so'

Monday 10th of August 2020 10:28:03 AM

Red Hook Studios are currently working on the free DLC The Butcher's Circus and with Season 2 about to release, the Linux (and macOS) versions are just about ready.

To be clear, Darkest Dungeon is already on Linux but the updates to support this brand new competitive game mode are not. Red Hook Studios have been pretty clear on it for some time that it would come later, and they mentioned in early July about it being close but they wanted to ensure they're ready for release.

In a fresh blog post update, they mentioned this:

MacOS, Linux, Offline Bots, and Direct Challenge improvements are ready for testing internally and while they won’t be with tomorrow’s update, you can expect these features in the next week or so.

So hold onto your hats, The Butcher's Circus is coming to Linux Town really soon.

What does it feature?

  • New Hamlet Location: The Butcher's Circus
  • Engage in no-holds-barred PvP combat with teams of 4 heroes (without risking your Campaign heroes)
  • Climb the ranks to show off your command of heroes and ability to weather misfortune and violence
  • Unlock banner components and use your creativity to assemble your own duelist heraldry
  • Strategize with new gladiatorial trinkets that can mean all the difference in pitched battles against other heroes
  • A gleefully warped musical theme by Stuart Chatwood, Narrator quips by the esteemed Wayne June, and all new gripping sound FX by Power Up Audio

You can buy Darkest Dungeon on Humble Store, Steam and GOG although currently this free DLC is not planned for GOG as they're waiting to see how it turns out.

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PlayStation 3 emulator RPCS3 gains online play with PSN Emulation

Monday 10th of August 2020 10:13:40 AM

It seems a very exciting development will be coming to the next release of the PlayStation 3 emulator RPCS3.

While they haven't done a blog post to go over their progress since 2019, work is as always ongoing. The main reason they don't often talk about progress, is simply a lack of people to go over it all and blog about it for them.

Thankfully though, they do release videos to show off and talk about some of the major progress. One such brand new feature coming is online play via PSN Emulation. That is absolutely huge especially since online features were such a major part of some games.

Check out their new video to showcase the feature:


Watch video on YouTube.com

They said that over the past year, they've been working on a private PSN server replacement which they're now calling RPCN. Just like the main project, it's free and open source and it's written in Rust too.

This server code, along with the hefty amount of improvements made to RPCS3 enables users to play in multiplayer and co-op modes in games that don't require a custom server in addition to PSN, or already have one. One such example for the latter would be Demon's Souls, which now fully works in multiplayer with RPCN as the private PSN server and DeSSE (by ymgve) as the private DeS custom server, with every feature intact.

It should be noted however that RPCN is far from being finished yet, so only a very small number of games work at the moment. In our current testing, Bomberman Ultra and Demon's Souls are the only ones that work reliably, but hopefully the community will discover others that work well too!

Preview downloads for Linux and Windows can be found in the YouTube video description, we won't link to them directly as they may update the links. So amazing to see how far RPCS3 has come. The PlayStation 3 was such a hugely popular console and emulation like this is vital so we don't lose so many amazing experiences.

You can see the ongoing work on GitHub for this feature here. More info on the whole RPCS3 project on the website.

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RetroArch 1.9.0 is out with video player improvements, UI upgrades and more

Monday 10th of August 2020 09:47:42 AM

RetroArch is practically the go-to for all your emulation needs under one roof and the project just release the latest major upgrade with RetroArch 1.9.0.

It seems they've continued going over the user interface, with an aim to make everything clearer and more useful. Part of this work went into adding a new "Explore View" for playlists, which lets you search and find content based on criteria like the amount of players, developer or publisher, the system it was released for and much more. This only looks through what you've directly added though and the metadata it uses will be improved as time goes on.

The search function that was previously "woefully inadequate" to the point that they called it "mostly a non-feature". Well, it's again a UI area they've gone back to and overhauled. You can now press 'X' on a pad or '/' on keyboard to get a search box, if you're on a playlist it becomes a filter for it and you can stack the filters to refine your search if you have a big library to search through. They showed off a little video of it in action, looks good:

 

Video Source: RetroArch Team.

There's also new animations for loading content, input remapping is easier and requires less clicking around, the video player on Linux and Windows gained a new progress bar overlay, big memory leaks were solved in the video player and an issue with lockups occurring due to it being able to seek passed the end of a file has a workaround in place.

You should also expect the memory footprint and disk I/O overhead to be reduced, resulting in a snappier RetroArch that won't bring your hardware to a crawl. On top of that, there's various other UI cleanups like not being able to set drivers to 'null' and the ability to selectively hide/enable many different widget notifications like screenshot and cheat code UI.

The team mentioned a progress report on the various Cores will be coming soon. You can read the release announcement here.

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The weekend round-up: tell us what play button you've been clicking recently

Saturday 8th of August 2020 11:41:11 AM

What's that? It's the weekend? It can't be already can it? Yes. It's time for the weekend chat about what we've been playing and what you've been playing.

There's been so many good Linux supported releases lately I've been a bit spoilt for choice including these just in the last week: DemonCrawl, UnderMine, The Battle of Polytopia, LittlewoodMonster Crown, Core Defense and Hellpoint (plus plenty more I've missed).

Recently though, I've been having masses of fun in Orcs Must Die! 3 on Stadia with a co-op partner. Getting to test out all the different trap combinations, it's genuinely good fun. It was fun enough by myself but now with a partner, it's far more amusing especially trying the later difficulties. Good manic entertainment.

As for actual Linux-desktop games, Jupiter Hell sucked me right in once more. Jupiter Hell is the spritual successor to DRL (D**m, the Roguelike) and it's one of the most furious roguelikes I've ever played. While turn-based, it's so streamlined and fluid it feels almost realtime. It's also quite gorgeous in places. Jupiter Hell has evolved quite nicely during Early Access and it's easily worth a look.

I also spoke to the developer of Haque, a rather fantastic glitch fantasy roguelike from 2017. As great as it is, the Steam build had a bug where a file was named "Haque_Text.zip" but the game was looking for "haque_text.zip". Linux case-sensitivity strikes again. They mentioned they will fix it as soon as possible.

Additionally: it appears that there's another big CPU security issue, this time not just affecting Intel. According to the paper it should affect Intel, ARM, IBM, and AMD CPUs.

Lastly, NVIDIA put up a new Vulkan Beta Driver 450.56.06 with the sole change listed as new support for the VK_EXT_4444_formats extension that landed with Vulkan API spec 1.2.149 that we reported on here.

Deals Reminder:

Unless something big / important comes up, we shall see you Monday for another week of Linux news.

Over to you in the comments: what have you been gaming on Linux lately and what are you looking forward to the most across this year?

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Techland confirm Dying Light Hellraid will see plenty of updates post-release

Friday 7th of August 2020 04:05:32 PM

Dying Light - Hellraid is the upcoming DLC that swaps Zombies for Skeletons and turns Dying Light into something of a dungeon crawler. It's exciting and it's going to continually get updates after release.

Reminder: the DLC is inspired by and using some ideas from Hellraid, which was originally going to be a standalone first-person co-op slasher. Techland appear to have shelved it completely so they're making sure it didn't all go to waste this way. I'm pretty happy about it because if there's one thing I want, it's more Dying Light content.

It's due for release on August 13 after a small delay and it seems Techland have been taking on plenty of feedback from the recent Beta, which we showed off some footage of recently which you can see below:


Watch video on YouTube.com

Techland have confirmed these improvements are already in:

  • New sounds for the Torturer. Now he’s much more terrifying.
  • Skeleton warriors now have their own unique set of animations.
  • Numerous graphical fixes, including making loot pouches look much more “medieval.”
  • Camouflage is now banned in Hellraid Tower - sorry, Chameleons!
  • Better experience in coop.
  • No more immortal skeletons from portals.
  • Balancing, balancing and balancing!

On top of that little list, Techland are also planning to continue updating it with new Dying Light in-game events, new content and new dedicated Hellraid updates. As they said "in typical Techland fashion, we plan to release several free Hellraid DLC updates". The first of these free updates is planned for late September, which they've codenamed "Lord Hector's Demise" that will add: two additional ranks that unlock new weapons and new collectibles, bounties made specifically for Hellraid and more.

You can pre-order the Hellraid DLC from Humble Store and Steam. Dying Light itself can be picked up on Humble Store and Steam.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com - do not reproduce this article without permission. This RSS feed is intended for readers, not scrapers.

Quirky vehicle building game 'Making it Home' is now in Early Access

Friday 7th of August 2020 01:10:07 PM

Making it Home looks so bizarre that I feel like I just need to give it a go. You're a ladybug building a vehicle to travel from one side of America to the other.

Yes, a ladybug. I did say it looks bizarre. Even the developer thinks their idea is weird. They said it's "kinda Oregon Trail meets Banjo Kazooie Nuts and Bolts with a bit of Far Lone Sails - and a smoking crab and bear - with carrots and peas - and honey... and dehumidifiers". Are we any clearer? No but it looks a bit amusing. The point is to build a big Rube Goldberg styled contraption, then platformer all over it to interact with it and collect stuff along the way.


Watch video on YouTube.com

It also features a narrative written by David Towsey (The Walkin' Trilogy, Widow's Welcome) and a sound track by Jordan Rees whose works are regularly used in big film trailers and TV broadcasters. I'm just here for the flying carrots and the giant rabbit. Or is it a normal sized rabbit and everything just looks big because you're a ladybug? I have many questions.

You can find it now in Early Access on itch.io and Steam.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com - do not reproduce this article without permission. This RSS feed is intended for readers, not scrapers.

Len's Island plans to blend together peaceful building with intense dungeon exploration

Friday 7th of August 2020 12:50:18 PM

Len's Island sounds like quite a peculiar mix. Blending together peaceful building, farming and crafting, mixed with intense combat, dungeon battles and deep questing and exploration. We've got plenty of games that do either side of the coin with building or dungeon crawling but both together? I'm eager to see how that will all work. Even more so because of the setting and the lovely colourful style it provides.

"Len's Island brings excitement and progression for many playstyles, all within a vibrant and engaging world. Catering to the hardcore dungeon-crawler fans, home-builders and decorators, explorers and completionists, farming fanatics, collectable hoarders, and people who just want to live the simple life chopping trees as the sun goes down."


Watch video on YouTube.com

Flow Studio are currently crowdfunding the game on Kickstarter, against their $33,400 (Australian Dollars) goal they've managed to just reach over the top with around 16 days to go. Curiously, they said in their Kickstarter comments that a Linux build should be done, if not at release then shortly after. At least they're being honest about it:

We are looking into a Linux build for the game. We can currently only promise Windows and Mac for the launch in March. However, we hope to add Linux to that list. If we cannot achieve a Linux version for the launch date, we will be looking into launching the Linux version soon after.

Looks absolutely wonderful, so hopefully they will do it. We've popped it into our follow list to let you know if they end up delivering on that.

You can follow it on Kickstarter and Steam.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com - do not reproduce this article without permission. This RSS feed is intended for readers, not scrapers.

More in Tux Machines

Arcan 0.6 – ‘M’ – Start Networking

This time around, the changes are big enough across the board that the sub-projects will get individual posts instead of being clumped together, and that will become a recurring theme as the progress cadence becomes less and less interlocked. We also have a sister blog at www.divergent-desktop.org that will slowly cover higher level design philosophy, rants and reasoning behind some of what is being done here. A few observant ones have pieced together the puzzle — but most have not. This release is a thematic shift from low level graphics plumbing to the network transparency related code. We will still make and accept patches, changes and features to the lower video layers, of course — ‘Moby Blit’ is still out there — but focus will be elsewhere. Hopefully this will be one of the last time these massive releases make sense, and we can tick on a (bi-)monthly basis for a while. Read more Also: Arcan 0.6 Display Server Adds Network Transparency, XWayland Client Isolation - Phoronix

Games: HIVESWAP: ACT 2, Gaming Rack Design and Construction, Parkitect and DualSense

  • Amusing adventure game HIVESWAP: ACT 2 is out now | GamingOnLinux

    With no prior knowledge of the Homestuck web comic series needed, the second part of the video game adventure is out now with HIVESWAP: ACT 2. "The artistry and humor of the golden age of adventure games meet hand-drawn 2D animation in this love letter to the point-and-click classics. Bizarre, beautifully illustrated alien landscapes and colorful characters make Alternia a joy to explore."

  • Gaming Rack Design and Construction – CubicleNate's Techpad

    I have collected a number of gaming systems throughout my life and there is little point in having them if they sit in a box or using them takes an annoying level of set-up time, making it fun prohibitive. I was then inspired by Perifractic Retro Recipes video where the computer museum has everything so nicely laid out. I looked at my mess and decided that I had to do something about it because my arrangement just isn’t presentable.

  • Theme park building game Parkitect is getting 8-player online multiplayer | GamingOnLinux

    With the second year release anniversary of the great theme park building game Parkitect coming up, Texel Raptor had a quite a huge surprise ready. Releasing on December 8 is the free cooperative online multiplayer mode. This is absolutely crazy considering the type of game it is, and one I can only imagine right now being ridiculously fun to play online with others. Eight people in total too, that's a lot of building that can get done. Texel Raptor mentioned you can see what everyone else is doing, and it's going to have a full online lobby system it seems too.

  • The DualSense Is Making Even More Sense - Boiling Steam

    As reported earlier this month, the DualSense controller from Sony was already working great out of the box on Linux. However, it wasn’t long after that that Valve added support for the more advanced features of the device. Starting November 12, Valve updated the controller to have basic input functionality with their beta Steam client:

Devices/Embedded and Open Hardware Leftovers

  • Embedded Linux for Teams | Ubuntu

    Developer-friendly embedded Linux should just deliver apps to devices. Satellite companies don’t build their own rockets. They focus on building satellites and lease a rocket to deliver it as a payload. Many developer teams also have to “build the rocket” to deliver embedded applications. Developers would be more successful, if Linux vendors made it their job to provide and maintain the scaffold that teams need to deliver embedded apps. In such a world, teams would focus on creating apps. The resulting app-centric development cycle could boil down to booting, building and deploying. Building on top of vendor-provided scaffolds, developers would create a bootable image for their target boards. Teams would then develop apps. After testing, they will build a system image that delivers all these apps. Then burn, deploy, done.

  • Personal Raspberry Pi music streamer
  • Run Pi-hole as a container with Podman on openSUSE - SUSE Communities

    There is arguably no better way to protect devices on your local network from unwanted content than Pi-hole. Add a machine running Pi-hole to your network, and it will quietly scrub all incoming traffic from pesky stuff like ads and trackers in the background. As the name suggests, Pi-hole was initially designed to run on a Raspberry Pi. But if you already have a machine running openSUSE on your network, you can deploy a Pi-hole container on it instead. And to make things a bit more interesting, you can use Podman instead of Docker for that. Installing Podman on openSUSE 15.2 is a matter of running the sudo zypper install podman command. A Pi-hole container needs the 80 and 53 ports, so make sure that these ports are available on your machine.

  • MorphESP 240 ESP32-S2 board integrates a 1.3-inch color display (Crowdfunding)

    We’ve already seen ESP32 platforms with a color display such as M5Stack, but MorphESP 240 is kind of cute with a 1.3-inch color display, features the more recent ESP32-S2 WiFi processor, and supports battery power & charging.

  • Rockchip RK3588 specifications revealed – 8K video, 6 TOPS NPU, PCIe 3.0, up to 32GB RAM

    Rockchip RK3588 is one of the most anticipated processors for the year on this side of the Internet with the octa-core processor features four Cortex-A76 cores, four Cortex-A55 cores, an NPU, and 8K video decoding support. The roadmap shows an expected launch date in Q3/Q4 2020, but sadly the release date will be pushed back in the future. Having said that, the Rockchip Developer Conference (RKDC) is now taking place, and the company has put up a poster that reveals a bit more about the processor.

  • Arduino Blog » Arduino psychic ‘magically’ guesses random numbers

    Standard Arduino Nanos can be used for many purposes, but they do not feature wireless capabilities. Somehow, though, Hari Wiguna’s Arduino psychic system is apparently able to pass data between two of them. No external communication hardware is implemented, yet one Nano is able to recognize when a random number chosen on the other Nano setup is input via an attached keypad. As noted by Wiguna, it’s easier shown than explained, and you can see this techno-magic trick in action in the first clip. How things work is revealed in the second video, but can you guess how it’s done?

Security, Digital Restrictions (DRM), and Proprietary Problems

  • Best forensic and pentesting Linux distros of 2020

    20.04 LTS and uses the Xfce desktop, and is available as a single ISO only for 64-bit machines. In addition to the regular boot options, the distro’s boot menu also offers the option to boot into a forensics mode where it doesn’t mount the disks on the computer. BackBox includes some of the most common security and analysis tools. The project aims for a wide spread of goals, ranging from network analysis, stress tests, sniffing, vulnerability assessment, computer forensic analysis, exploitation, privilege escalation, and more. All the pentesting tools are neatly organized in the Auditing menu under relevant categories. These are broadly divided into three sections. The first has tools to help you gather information about the environment, assess vulnerabilities of web tools, and more. The second has tools to help you reverse-engineer programs and social-engineer people. The third has tools for all kinds of analysis. BackBox has further customized its application menu to display tooltips with a brief description of each bundled tool, which will be really helpful for new users who aren’t familiar with the tools. As an added bonus, the distro also ships with Tor and a script that will route all Internet bound traffic from the distro via the Tor network.

  • Thanksgiving security updates

    Security updates have been issued by openSUSE (blueman, chromium, firefox, LibVNCServer, postgresql10, postgresql12, thunderbird, and xen), Slackware (bind), SUSE (bluez, kernel, LibVNCServer, thunderbird, and ucode-intel), and Ubuntu (mutt, poppler, thunderbird, and webkit2gtk).

  • Drupal core - Critical - Arbitrary PHP code execution - SA-CORE-2020-013

    AC:Complex/A:User/CI:All/II:All/E:Exploit/TD:UncommonVulnerability: Arbitrary PHP code executionCVE IDs: CVE-2020-28949CVE-2020-28948Description: The Drupal project uses the PEAR Archive_Tar library. The PEAR Archive_Tar library has released a security update that impacts Drupal. For more information please see: CVE-2020-28948 CVE-2020-28949 Multiple vulnerabilities are possible if Drupal is configured to allow .tar, .tar.gz, .bz2 or .tlz file uploads and processes them. To mitigate this issue, prevent untrusted users from uploading .tar, .tar.gz, .bz2 or .tlz files. This is a different issue than SA-CORE-2019-12, similar configuration changes may mitigate the problem until you are able to patch.

  • Financial software firm cites security, control as reasons for moving from email to Slack [Ed: Unbelievable stupidity; Slack is illegal mass surveillance and it’s centralised proprietary software (whereas E-mail can be encrypted, e2e)]

    ASX-listed financial software firm Iress is moving away from email to Slack for communications and its chief technology officer, Andrew Todd, says this is because the app offers improved security and control.

  • Introducing another free CA as an alternative to Let's Encrypt

    Let's Encrypt is an amazing organisation doing an amazing thing by providing certificates at scale, for free. The problem though was that they were the only such organisation for a long time, but I'm glad to say that the ecosystem is changing.

  • Denuvo's Anti-Piracy Protection Probably Makes Sense For Big-Selling AAA Titles

    A hacking team believed to have obtained data from gaming giant Ubisoft has published documents that claim to reveal the costs of implementing Denuvo's anti-piracy protection. While the service doesn't come cheap, the figures suggest that for a big company putting out big titles with the potential for plenty of sales, the anti-tamper technology may represent value for money.

  • Disappointing: Netflix Decides To Settle With Chooseco LLC Over 'Bandersnatch' Lawsuit

    Well, it's been quite a stupid and frustrating run in the trademark lawsuit between Netflix and Chooseco LLC, the folks behind Choose Your Own Adventure books from our youth. At issue was the Black Mirror production Bandersnatch, in which the viewer takes part in an interactive film where they help decide the outcome. The main character is creating a book he refers to as a "choose your own adventure" book. Chooseco also complained that the dark nature of the film would make the public think less of CYOA books as a result. Netflix fought back hard, arguing for a dismissal on First Amendment grounds, since the film is a work of art and the limited use or reference to CYOA books was an important, though small, part of that art. The court decided that any such argument was better made at trial and allowed this madness to proceed, leading Netflix to petition for the cancellation of Chooseco's trademark entirely. This story all seemed to be speeding towards an appropriately impactful conclusion.

  • TPM circumvention and website blocking orders: An EU perspective

    Website blocking orders in IP cases (mostly, though not solely, in relation to copyright-infringing websites) are routinely granted in several jurisdictions, whether in Europe or third countries. The availability of such relief has been established in case law, administrative frameworks and academic studies alike. The Court of Justice of the European Union ('CJEU') expressly acknowledged the compatibility of such a remedy with EU law in its 2014 decision in UPC Telekabel. Also the European Court of Human Rights recently found that, although it is necessary that this particular remedy is available within a balanced and carefully drafted legislative framework which contains a robust and articulated set of safeguards against abuse, website blocking orders are not per se contrary to the provision in Article 10 ECHR. Over time, courts and other authorities (including administrative authorities in certain EU Member States) have dealt with applications which have: been based on different legal grounds; been aimed at protecting different types of rights; and resulted in different types of orders against internet service providers ('ISPs'). An interesting recent development concerns website blocking orders in relation to websites that market and sell devices and software aimed at circumventing technological protection measures (‘TPMs’). TPMs offer rights holders an ancillary right of protection and are deployed to protect against infringement of copyright in works that subsist in multimedia content such as video games. TPMs are a cornerstone in copyright protection in the digital age where large-scale copying and dissemination of copyright-protected content is so prevalent. [...] In light of the foregoing, copyright owners appear entitled to seek injunctions against intermediaries to also block access to websites dealing with TPM-circumventing devices. The legal basis for that can also be, subject to satisfying all the other requirements under EU and national law, the domestic provision implementing Article 8(3) of the InfoSoc Directive. All in all, it appears likely that we will see more blocking orders in the future, including orders – issued by courts and competent authorities around Europe – targeting websites that provide TPM-circumventing devices. This is an unsurprising and natural evolution of website blocking jurisprudence. It also serves to show the very flexibility of this type of remedy and, matched inter alia with the loose notion of ‘intermediary’, its inherently broad availability.

  • Prolonged AWS outage takes down a big chunk of the internet

    Many apps, services, and websites have posted on Twitter about how the AWS outage is affecting them, including 1Password, Acorns, Adobe Spark, Anchor, Autodesk, Capital Gazette, Coinbase, DataCamp, Getaround, Glassdoor, Flickr, iRobot, The Philadelphia Inquirer, Pocket, RadioLab, Roku, RSS Podcasting, Tampa Bay Times, Vonage, The Washington Post, and WNYC. Downdetector.com has also shown spikes in user reports of problems with many Amazon services throughout the day.