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Softpedia News / Linux
Updated: 2 hours 29 min ago

Mageia 7 Linux OS Released with Linux 5.1 Kernel, KDE Plasma 5.15 and GNOME 3.32

Monday 1st of July 2019 04:40:00 PM
The Mageia community has released today the Mageia 7 Linux operating system, a major version that brings up-to-date components and several new features for fans of this Mandriva derivative.

Almost two years in the work, the Mageia 7 Linux operating system is now available to download and comes packed with numerous of the latest GNU/Linux technologies and Open Source software. Mageia 7 is powered by one of the most recent kernels from the Linux 5.1 series and features the latest Mesa 19.1 graphics stack.

Mageia 7 also features a wide range of desktop environments and window managers, but it's shipped in three main editions with the KDE Plasma 5.15.4, GNOME 3.32, and Xfce 4.14pre desktops. Support for Wayland and hybrid graphics cards has been enhanced as well in Mageia 7, which comes with an extended collection of games.

"As with everything to do with Mageia, this release would not have happened without the help of our amazing community that gives their time to mak... (read more)

Purism's Security Key Will Generate Keys Directly on the Device, Made in the USA

Sunday 30th of June 2019 08:45:00 PM
Purism, the hardware manufacturer known for its secure Linux-powered laptops and the upcoming Librem 5 security-focused Linux smartphone, announced the upcoming release of the second version of its Librem Key security key.

Launched last year in September, Librem Key is the first and only OpenPGP-based security key designed to offer a Heads-firmware-integrated tamper-evident boot process for laptops. It has the ultimate goal of protecting users' digital lives by storing security keys on the devices, encrypted with the highest cryptographic algorithms.

Next month, Purism wants to launch the second generation of Librem Key, which promises even more protection for users by securely generating security keys directly on the device, while being able to store up to 4096-bit RSA keys and up to 512-bit ECC keys. Best of all, Purism has moved the production of the Librem Key to the U.S..

"Having a secure supply chain is critical for hardware that holds your most sensitive se... (read more)

openSUSE Leap 42.3 Linux OS Reached End of Life, Upgrade to openSUSE Leap 15.1

Sunday 30th of June 2019 12:01:01 AM
The openSUSE Leap 42.3 Linux-powered operating system has reached end of life on June 30th, 2019, which means that it will no longer receive software and security updates.

Released two years ago, on July 26th, 2017, the openSUSE Leap 42.3 operating system was the third maintenance update to the openSUSE Leap 42 series, which is also the last to be based on the SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 12 operating system series.

openSUSE Leap 42.3 was based on the packages from SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 3 and was powered by the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel series. It was initially supposed to be supported until January 2019, but the openSUSE and SUSE projects decided to give users more time to upgrade to the major openSUSE Leap 15 series.

Today, six months later, that upgrade window is over and openSUSE Leap 42.3 offi... (read more)

Canonical Fixes Linux Kernel Regression in All Supported Ubuntu Releases

Saturday 29th of June 2019 03:22:00 PM
Canonical released today new Linux kernel versions for all supported Ubuntu operating system releases to address a regression introduced by the latest kernel security update.

Last week, Canonical released Linux kernel updates for all supported Ubuntu releases to address several security vulnerabilities discovered by Jonathan Looney in Linux kernel's TCP retransmission queue implementation when handling some specific TCP Selective Acknowledgment (SACKs).

Known as SACK Panic, these security vulnerabilities affect Ubuntu 19.04, Ubuntu 18.10, Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS systems and could allow a remote attacker to crash the affected systems by causing a denial of service by constructing an ongoing sequence of requests.

However, it w... (read more)

Google Releases Chrome OS 75 to Let Linux Apps Access Android Devices over USB

Thursday 27th of June 2019 03:09:00 PM
Google has released the Chrome OS 75 operating system for supported Chromebook devices, a major release that adds various new features, latest security patches, and other improvements.

Chrome OS 75 has been promoted to the stable channel as version 75.0.3770.102 (Platform version: 12105.75.0) for most Chromebook devices. This release introduces a new parental control feature that lets parents limit the time to their kids spend on Chrome OS devices, and it also enables kid-friendly Assistant for child accounts.

While still in beta, the support for Linux apps is improving with every release, and Chrome OS 75 introduces support for Linux apps to access Android devices over USB connections. Moreover, the Files app has been enhanced with support for third-part... (read more)

SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 Service Pack 1 Officially Released, Here's What's New

Tuesday 25th of June 2019 04:42:00 PM
SUSE has announced the general availability of the first Service Pack (SP1) release for their latest and most advanced SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 operating system series.

Released a year ago, the SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 operating system brought numerous new features and enhancements, along with an updated application delivery solution and software-defined infrastructure to help enterprises better adapt and transform their IT departments for their business models. Now, the first Service Pack release is here to further refine the world's first multimodal operating system.

"SUSE Linux Enterprise is a modern and modular OS that helps simplify multimodal IT, making traditional IT infrastructure efficient and providing an engaging platform for developers," said Thomas Di Giacomo, SUSE president of Engineering, Product ... (read more)

KDE Plasma 5.16.2 Desktop Environment Released with More Than 30 Bug Fixes

Tuesday 25th of June 2019 02:30:00 PM
The KDE Project released today the second maintenance update to the latest KDE Plasma 5.16 open-source desktop environment for Linux-based operating systems.

Coming just one week after the first point release, the KDE Plasma 5.16.2 maintenance update is here to add yet another layer of bug fixes with the ultimate goal to make the KDE Plasma 5.16 desktop environment more stable and reliable for users. In particular, this second point release introduces a total of 34 changes across various core components and apps.

"Today KDE releases a bugfix update to KDE Plasma 5, versioned 5.16.2. Plasma 5.16 was released in June with many feature refinements and new modules to complete the desktop experience. This release adds a week's worth of new transla... (read more)

Canonical Releases Linux Kernel Security Patch for 64-Bit PowerPC Ubuntu Systems

Monday 24th of June 2019 08:44:00 PM
Canonical released today a new Linux kernel security update for several of its supported Ubuntu Linux releases to address a security issue affecting 64-Bit PowerPC systems.

Affecting the Ubuntu 19.04 (Disco Dingo), Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish), and Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating systems, the new Linux kernel security patch fixes a vulnerability (CVE-2019-12817) on 64-bit PowerPC (ppc64el) systems, which could allow a local attacker to access memory contents or corrupt the memory of other processes.

"It was discovered that the Linux kernel did not properly separate certain memory mappings when creating new userspace processes on 64-bit Power (ppc64el) systems. A local attacker could use this to access memory contents or cause memory corruption of other processes on the system," reads the security advisory.

Users are urg... (read more)

Canonical Assures Users 32-bit Apps Will Run on Ubuntu 19.10 and Future - Updated

Monday 24th of June 2019 03:00:00 PM
Due to recent escalations, Canonical updated their view on the removal of support for the i386 (32-bit) architecture for Ubuntu 19.10 and future releases to assure users 32-bit apps will still run on the Linux-based operating system.

Last week, Canonical announced that they will completely deprecate support for 32-bit (i386) hardware architectures in future Ubuntu Linux releases, starting with the upcoming Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) operating system, due for release later this fall on October 17th. However, the company mentioned the fact that while 32-bit support is going away, there will still be ways to run 32-bit apps on a 64-bit OS.

As Canonical didn't give more details on the matter at the time of the announcement, many users started complaining about how they will be able to run certain 32-bit apps and game... (read more)

Official Raspberry Pi OS Updated with Raspberry Pi 4 Support, Based on Debian 10

Monday 24th of June 2019 01:55:00 PM
The Raspberry Pi Foundation announced today the release of a new version of the official operating system for the tiny Raspberry Pi single-board computers to support their latest Raspberry Pi 4 release.

With the launch of the Raspberry Pi 4 SBC series, the Raspberry Pi Foundation released a new version of Raspbian OS, the official Raspberry Pi operating system based on the popular Debian GNU/Linux distribution. This release adds numerous new features and improvements, but the biggest change is that it supports the Raspberry Pi 4 Model B single-board computer.

Another major change in the new Raspbian OS release is that the entire operating system has been rebased on the soon-to-be-released Debian GNU/L... (read more)

Valve Says Steam for Linux Won't Support Ubuntu 19.10 and Future Releases - Updated

Monday 24th of June 2019 03:36:00 AM
Valve developer Pierre-Loup Griffais working on Steam for Linux announced that they will drop support for the upcoming Ubuntu 19.10 release, as well as future Ubuntu Linux releases.

Valve's harsh announcement comes just a few days after Canonical's announcement that they will drop support for 32-bit (i386) architectures in Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine). Pierre-Loup Griffais said on Twitter that Steam for Linux won't be officially supported on Ubuntu 19.10, nor any future releases.

The Steam developer also added that Valve will focus their efforts on supporting other Linux-based operating systems for Steam for Linux. They will be looking for a GNU/Linux distribution that still offers support for 32-bit apps, and that they will try to minimize the breakage for Ubuntu users.

"Ubuntu 19.10 and future releases will not ... (read more)

You Can Now Buy Linux Notebooks Powered by Zorin OS from Star Labs

Friday 21st of June 2019 08:59:00 PM
The makers of the Zorin OS Linux operating system announced today that they partnered with a computer manufacturer to offer users notebooks powered by Zorin OS.

The wait is over, as Zorin OS has partnered with Star Labs, a UK-based computer manufacturer specialised in selling Linux-powered notebooks, to offer you two new laptops running the latest version of Zorin OS, fully customized and optimised for these powerful and slick notebooks.

"Creating a Linux desktop experience that’s accessible to everyone has always been our mission at Zorin OS," reads today's announcement. "Today we’re taking the next step in this mission by making Zorin OS easier for the masses to access: on new computers powered by Zorin OS."

Meet Star LabTop and Star Lite notebooks with Zorin OS 15

Meet the Star LabTop and Star Lite notebooks powered b... (read more)

Ubuntu Linux Gets Intel MDS Mitigations for Intel Sandy Bridge CPUs, Update Now

Friday 21st of June 2019 04:56:00 PM
Canonical released another update for the intel-microcode firmware for all supported Ubuntu Linux operating systems to address recent Intel MDS (Microarchitectural Data Sampling) security vulnerabilities.

Last month on May 14th, Intel published details about four new security vulnerabilities affecting several of its Intel microprocessor families. The company released updated microcode firmware to mitigate these hardware flaws, which quickly landed in the software repositories of all supported Ubuntu releases, but only some of the processor families were supported.

Last week, intel-microcode firmware updates arrived in Ubuntu's repositories to mitigate these new security vulnerabilities on systems using read more)

GNOME Asia Summit 2019 Announced for GNOME 3.36 "Gresik" Desktop in Indonesia

Friday 21st of June 2019 02:55:00 PM
The GNOME Foundation announced the official dates for their summer developer and user conference, GNOME Asia Summit 2019, which will take place later this fall in Indonesia.

Every year, the GNOME developers and contributors gather together for the GUADEC (GNOME Users And Developers European Conference) and GNOME Asia Summit events to plan the next major release of their beloved, open-source desktop environment for Linux-based operating systems.

While the GUADEC 2019 conference will kick off this summer between August 23rd and 28th, in Thessaloniki, Greece, for the upcoming GNOME 3.34 "Thessaloniki" desktop environment, the GNOME Asia Summit 2019 event will take place between October 11th and 13th, 2019, in Gresik, Indonesia.

The GNOME Asia Summit 2019 conference will be held at the Universitas Muhammadiyah Gresik (UMG) for the GNOME 3.36 desktop environment, whi... (read more)

CentOS 7 and RHEL 7 Get Important Linux Kernel Update to Patch SACK Panic Flaws

Friday 21st of June 2019 02:18:00 PM
The Red Hat Enterprise Linux and CentOS Linux operating systems have received new Linux kernel security updates that are marked as important and address the recently disclosed TCP vulnerabilities affecting all GNU/Linux distributions.

The new Linux kernel security updates patch an integer overflow flaw (CVE-2019-11477) discovered by Jonathan Looney in Linux kernel's networking subsystem processed TCP Selective Acknowledgment (SACK) segments, which could allow a remote attacker to cause a so-called SACK Panic attack (denial of service) by sending malicious sequences of SACK segments on a TCP connection that has a small TCP MSS value.

"While processing SACK segments, the Linux kernel's socket buffer (SKB) data structure becomes fragmented," reads Red Hat's security advisory. "Each fragment is about TCP maximum segment size (MSS) byt... (read more)

Debian's Intel MDS Mitigations Are Available for Sandy Bridge Server/Core-X CPUs

Thursday 20th of June 2019 04:51:00 PM
The Debian Project recently announced the general availability of a new security update for the intel-microcode firmware to patch the recently disclosed Intel MDS (Microarchitectural Data Sampling) vulnerabilities on more Intel CPUs.

Last month, on May 14th, Intel disclosed four new security vulnerabilities affecting many of its Intel microprocessor families. The tech giant was quick to release updated microcode firmware to mitigate these flaws, but not all the processor families were patched.

Therefore, the Debian Project has now released a new version of the intel-microcode firmware to mitigate the Intel MDS (Microarchitectural Data Sampling) hardware vulnerabilities, including (CVE-2018-12126 (MSBDS), read more)

Security-Oriented Alpine Linux Receives Serial & Ethernet Support for ARM Boards

Thursday 20th of June 2019 03:17:00 PM
Natanael Copa's security-oriented Alpine Linux operating system has been updated to version 3.10.0, a major release that brings several new features, various improvements and bug fixes, as well as lots of updated components.

Alpine Linux 3.10.0 has been released and it is now available as the latest and most advanced stable version of the security-oriented operating system based on the musl libc libraries, and using the powerful and open-source BusyBox utility for general system administration.

It brings the cross-desktop LightDM display manager, the Ceph distributed object store and file system, and iwd (iNet wireless daemon) as a replacement for wpa_supplicant, though Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP) support isn't working in this release. It also adds serial and Ethernet support for ARM boards.

Now powered by Linux kernel 4.19 and GCC 8.3

Powered by the Linux 4.... (read more)

Canonical Outs New Linux Kernel Live Patch for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and 16.04 LTS

Thursday 20th of June 2019 01:44:00 PM
Canonical released a new Linux kernel live patch for the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system series to address the recently disclosed TCP Denial of Service (DoS) vulnerabilities.

Coming hot on the heels of the recent Linux kernel security updates published earlier this week for all supported Ubuntu releases, the new Linux kernel live patch is only targeted at Ubuntu versions that support the kernel live patch and are long-term supported, including Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus).

And it's here to address the same two security vulnerabilities (CVE-2019-11477 and read more)

KDE Plasma 5.16 Desktop Environment Gets First Point Release, Update Now

Wednesday 19th of June 2019 02:05:00 PM
The KDE Project released today the first maintenance update to the recently released KDE Plasma 5.16 desktop environment for Linux-based operating systems.

KDE Plasma 5.16.1 is now available only one week after the release of the KDE Plasma 5.16 desktop environment series, a major version that adds numerous new features and improvements, including a totally revamped notifications system, new look and feel for the login, lock, and logout screens, better Wayland support, as well as numerous other desktop enhancements.

Consisting of a total of 21 bug fixes, the KDE Plasma 5.16.1 maintenance update is here to make the KDE Plasma 5.16 desktop environment more stable and reliable by addressing various issues reported by users lately, including an issue that broke the Sleep/Suspend command, and the ability for the Plasma Dis... (read more)

OpenMandriva Linux 4.0 Operating System Officially Released, Here's What's New

Tuesday 18th of June 2019 09:41:00 PM
The OpenMandriva community announced the general availability of the OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 operating system, a major release that brings numerous new features, updated components, and lots of improvements.

After almost two years in development, the OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 operating system is finally here and comes with numerous goodies for fans of the popular Linux bistro that continues the sprit of the now deprecated Mandriva and Mandrake Linux operating systems.

Compiled with LLVM/Clang instead of GCC (GNU Compiler Collection), OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 aims to be a cutting-edge Linux-based operating system that offers some of the highest levels of optimization by enabling LTO in certain packages to make it fast, stable, and reliable at all times.

This release brings dozens of updated components and new features, but most importantly better hardware support b... (read more)

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Linux 5.4 To Expose What's Keeping The System Awake Via Sysfs

The next Linux kernel version will expose the real-time sources of what's keeping the system awake via Sysfs compared to existing source information that previously was only available via DebugFS. With Linux 5.4, wakeup source statistics will now be exposed under /sys/class/wakeup/wakeup*/ for tracking wakeups, their counts, and related bits for profiling the system for power usage optimizations. Suspend-blocking wakeup sources have been available under DebugFS to be useful for bug reporting and analyzing battery consumption. This solidifies the work now under Sysfs with a stable ABI. In addition to the interfaces now stable in adding them to sysfs, it makes them more accessible compared to DebugFS often being restricted to root or other restrictions in place by different distribution kernels. Read more

Chrome murders FTP like Jeffrey Epstein

What is it with these people? Why can't things that are working be allowed to still go on working? (Blah blah insecure blah blah unused blah blah maintenance blah blah web everything.) This leaves an interesting situation where Google has, in its very own search index, HTML pages served by FTP its own browser won't be able to view... Read more

Programming Leftovers

  • Creating a Docker Swarm Stack with Terraform (Terrascript Python), Persistent Volumes and Dynamic HAProxy.

    Before someone blame me about why I am not using Kubernetes, AWS ECS, Mesos or anything but Swarm the answer is simple: Docker Swarm is an inexpensive and very simple thin orchestrator. Because of this it miss a lot of features that Kubernetes already implemented by default. Most of important data centers (Google, AWS, Azure, Oracle, IBM, Digital Ocean, etc) already implemented some sort of Kubernetes as a Service make it easy its adoption. However, docker swarm does not have any datacenter are implementing it and are creating some of structure ready to go as K8s has.

  • Python Filter()

    Python filter() function applies another function on a given iterable (List/String/Dictionary, etc.) to test which of its item to keep or discard. In simple words, it filters the ones that don’t pass the test and returns the rest as a filter object. The filter object is of the iterable type. It retains those elements which the function passed by returning True. We can also convert it to List or Tuple or other types using their factory functions. In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to use the filter() function with different types of sequences. Also, you can refer to the examples that we’ve added to bring clarity.

  • Sending HTML messages with Net::XMPP (Perl)

    This started with a very simple need: wanting to improve the notifications I’m receiving from various sources.

  • Excellent Free Books to Master Programming

    A quick search of the internet reveals a plethora of books for programmers. No one has time to read even a minuscule fraction of the available books. What you need is a curated list of programming books. Better than that. A curated list of free programming books. Free and open source books still have a cost — your time. And just because a book is free/open source doesn’t, itself, signify any great quality to the work. Hence the need for some recommendations for free books to help you learn C, C++, Java, Python, R, or whatever language takes your fancy. The books we’re recommending will help increase your technical skills and make you proficient in the language of your choice. And some of them even provide a little light relief on the way. Humor can be a great aid to learning.