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Updated: 17 min 17 sec ago

KDE's Plasma Mobile Now Supports Phone Calls on the PinePhone Linux Smartphone - Video

59 min 19 sec ago
KDE Project's Plasma Mobile team reports today on the progress made so far to better support PINE64's PinePhone open source Linux smartphone by implementing phone calls, and also updating apps.

As we reported earlier this month, KDE Plasma Mobile is already running well on the PinePhone, but not all things are working properly, such as phone calls, which the Plasma Mobile team reports that they managed to add multiple patches to integrate telephony functions with the graphical UI.

"Bhushan Shah submitted multiple patches in postmarketOS to integrate telephony functions with user interface. Using which PINE64 Pinephone can connect calls from user interface. Currently audio is a work in progress however, and we hope to have this resolved soon," said the Plasma Mobile team.

Application updates

You... (read more)

Nvidia Outs New Linux/BSD Graphics Driver with GeForce GTX 1650 SUPER Support

4 hours 13 min ago
Nvidia has released today a new set of long-lived proprietary graphics drivers for GNU/Linux, BSD, and Solaris 64-bit operating systems that adds support for a new GPU and various bug fixes.

For Linux- and BSD-based platforms, the Nvidia 440.36 proprietary graphics driver is here to add support for the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1650 SUPER graphics card, which Nvidia claims it's up to 50 percent faster than the original GTX 1650 and up to 2X faster than the previous-generation GTX 1050.

Now BSD and Linux gamers who bought an Nvidia GeForce GTX 1650 SUPER GPU can use it to play games at full performance if they install the Nvidia 440.36 proprietary graphics driver, which is available to download only for 64-bit operating systems from Nvidia.com or via our free software portal here and read more)

Audacity 2.3.3 Open-Source Audio Editor Released with Better AAC/M4A Exports

4 hours 30 min ago
The Audacity development team released today Audacity 2.3.3, a new maintenance update to the open-source and cross-platform video editor for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows operating systems.

Audacity 2.3.3 is mostly a bug fix release that addresses multiple issues reported by users from previous versions, but it also brings some improvements, such as a new quality setting for AAC/M4A exports, the ability to skip leading silence (blank space) in exports, as well as "What you hear is what you get" for exports.

This release also splits the equalization effect into two effects, namely Filter Curve and Graphic EQ, which supports presets using the Manage button and two points at same frequency for steep steps. Furthermore, Audacity 2.3.3 removes some functionality that confused users, such as Nyquist Workbench, Vocal Remover, On-Demand aliased files, and "Normalize on Load."

Bug fixes, workaround for macOS Catalina

After installing Audacity 2.3.3, users... (read more)

Canonical Teases Big Ubuntu Announcement with Leading Global Automation Company

Thursday 21st of November 2019 03:08:00 PM
Canonical, the company behind the popular Ubuntu Linux operating system, announced today that it will be present at the upcoming Smart Product Solutions (SPS) 2019 event in Nuremberg to showcase Ubuntu Core to the industrial Mittelstand.

Canonical continues to promote its Ubuntu Core operating system, a slimmed-down version of Ubuntu designed and optimized to run on smaller, embedded hardware, such as IoT (Internet of Things) devices, and it now promises to support the Mittelstand innovators, which are medium-sized companies, with Open Source software and GNU/Linux technologies.

"We at Canonical, are on a mission to empower innovators with open-source software. We endeavor to be a technology partner of big corporations as well as SMEs, in their journey to industry 4.0 transformation. For this purpose, we have made the latest and greatest embedded and IoT tech... (read more)

Security-Oriented Container Linux Gets Patched Against Latest Intel CPU Flaws

Thursday 21st of November 2019 02:09:00 PM
The security-oriented Container Linux by CoreOS GNU/Linux distribution has been updated this week with all the necessary patches to mitigate the latest Intel CPU microarchitecture vulnerabilities.

CoreOS Container Linux 2247.7.0 is here as the latest stable version of the security-oriented, minimal operating system for running containerized workloads securely and at scale, which was acquired by Red Hat last year and will soon become Fedora CoreOS. This release includes fixes for the CVE-2019-11135 and CVE-2018-12207 security vulnerabilities affecting Intel CPUs.

According to the release notes, CoreOS Container Linux 2247.7.0 fix... (read more)

Zorin OS 15 Lite Released as a Windows 7 Replacement, Based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

Wednesday 20th of November 2019 08:31:00 PM
The Zorin OS community announced today the general availability of the Zorin OS 15 Lite edition, an Xfce-based version optimized to run faster than Windows 7 on very old computers.

Based on Canonical's latest long-term supported Ubuntu 18.04 (Bionic Beaver) operating system series, Zorin OS 15 Lite is here packed with some of the most advanced and efficient software components and the latest Xfce 4.14 desktop environment, which provides a user-friendly experience and promises extend the lifespan of your PC for years to come.

"With Zorin OS 15 Lite, we've condensed the full Zorin OS experience into a streamlined operating system, designed to run fast on computers as old as 15 years. With version 15, we’ve gone the extra mile to make the XFCE 4.14-based desktop feel familiar and user-friendly to new users, especially those moving away from Windows 7," reads today's read more)

ExLight Linux Distro Is Now Based on Debian Buster, Powered by Linux Kernel 5.4

Wednesday 20th of November 2019 06:28:00 PM
GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton released today a new version of his ExLight GNU/Linux distribution, which features the lightweight Enlightenment desktop environment and a new Debian base.

ExLight Build 191120 is now available for download and it's Arne Exton's second GNU/Linux distribution to ship with the latest Linux 5.4 kernel series, which will officially be announced by Linus Torvalds at the end of the week, on November 24th. For now, ExLight Build 191120 ships with Linux kernel 5.4 RC8.

While previous versions of ExLight were based on Ubuntu, starting with Build 191120, the entire distribution is now based on the latest Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" operating system series, featuring the Enlightenment 0.22.4-2 desktop environment and the Calamares 3.2.4-3 graphical installer.

"ExLight is a pure Debian system... (read more)

IPFire Open-Source Linux Firewall Gets Improved and Faster QoS, Latest Updates - Updated

Monday 18th of November 2019 06:28:00 PM
The IPFire project released a new update to their Linux-based open-source firewall distribution, which brings latest software updates and much-improved and faster Quality of Service (QoS).

IPFire 2.23 Core Update 138 is now available for download with improved Quality of Service (QoS), which allows the firewall to pass even more traffic on smaller systems, as well as reduce packet latency on faster machines, thus creating a faster and more responsive network. To take full advantage of the improved and faster QoS, the IPFire project recommends you reboot your systems after installing the new update.

"Development around the Quality of Service and tackling some of the bugs required an exceptional amount of team effort in very short time and I am very happy that we are now able to deliver the result to you to improve your networks," said Michael Tremer in the read more)

LibreOffice 6.4 Enters Beta with Native GTK Dialogs, QR Code Generator, and More

Monday 18th of November 2019 06:21:00 PM
The upcoming LibreOffice 6.4 open-source and cross-platform office suite release has recently entered beta testing phase two months ahead of its official release early next year.

The upcoming LibreOffice 6.4 office suite has been in development for a few months now, but it's currently entered public beta testing, which means that more reliable builds are available for early adopters to try on the new features and improvements, among which we can mention native GTK dialogs on GNU/Linux systems, a QR code generator, and improved Microsoft Office interoperability.

Among other noteworthy enhancements, LibreOffice 6.4 will also add a new option in Writer to mark comments as resolved, along with faster table and table row/column moving and deletion, better selection of cells that contain hyperlinks in Calc, the ability to export Calc sheets to PDF with all pages in one PDF, as well ... (read more)

HP Linux Imaging & Printing Drivers Now Supported on Ubuntu 19.10 and Fedora 31

Monday 18th of November 2019 04:09:00 PM
The HP Linux Imaging and Printing (HPLIP) project has released a new version of their driver stack for Linux-based operation systems to support their HP printers and scanners on more devices and systems.

The HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.19.11 software stack is now available to download and it brings support for several new HP printers and scanners, including HP Color LaserJet MFP M776dn, HP Color LaserJet Flow MFP M776z, HP Color LaserJet Flow MFP M776zs, HP Color LaserJet M856dn, HP Color LaserJet M856x, and HP Color LaserJet E85055dn.

But what's more important in this new HPLIP release is the fact that users can now install the drivers for their HP printers and scanners on several new GNU/Linux distributions, such as Canonical's Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine), Fedora Project's Fedora 31, and Manjaro Linux 18.1.0. Of course, the drivers are only supported on 64-bit versions of these operating systems.

Job Accounting support arrives for more HP printersread more)

Linux Kernel 5.4 to Arrive on November 24th as Linus Torvalds Releases Last RC

Monday 18th of November 2019 03:40:00 PM
The highly anticipated Linux 5.4 kernel finally has a release date as Linus Torvalds announced over the weekend the last Release Candidate (RC).

Last week, Linus Torvalds was considering if there's need for an eighth Release Candidate (RC) for the upcoming Linux 5.4 kernel series, which is only needed on very busy development cycles, but while things were quite calm he still released the RC8 milestone just to make sure everything is in place and working out-of-the-box because more testing never hurts.

"I'm not entirely sure we need an rc8, because last week was pretty calm despite the Intel hw workarounds landing. So I considered just making a final 5.4 and be done with it, but decided that there's no real downside to just doing the rc8 after having a release cycle that took a while to calm down," said Linus Torvalds in a mailing list announcement.

And it turns out that there are some intere... (read more)

Debian GNU/Linux 10.2 "Buster" Live & Installable ISOs Now Available to Download

Sunday 17th of November 2019 03:42:00 PM
Just one day after announcing the availability of the Debian GNU/Linux 10.2 "Buster" maintenance update, the Debian Project now published live and installable ISO images for all supported architectures and flavors.

Debian GNU/Linux 10.2 "Buster" consists of over two months of updates release through the official software repositories. It includes a total of 115 security updates and bug fixes, offering the community the most up-to-date install mediums for the latest Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" operating system series.

Debian GNU/Linux 10.2 "Buster" ISO images are now available to download (see download links below) for all supported architectures, including 32-bit (i386), 64-bit (amd64), ARM64 (AArch64), Armel, ARMhf, MIPS, MIPSel (MIPS Little Endian), MIPS64el (MIPS 64-bit Little Endian), PPC64el (PowerPC 64-bit Li... (read more)

PCLinuxOS Gets November 2019 ISO with Refreshed Themes, Latest Updates

Saturday 16th of November 2019 10:10:00 PM
The PCLinuxOS community released their monthly ISO snapshots for November 2019, a release that contains all the latest bug and security updates, as well as various improvements.

PCLinuxOS 2019.11 is out now as the latest and most up to date installation medium for this independently developed and user-friendly GNU/Linux distribution, including a fully updated system with all the updates released as of November 12th, 2019, with refreshed themes for GRUB, bootsplash, and the desktop.

PCLinuxOS 2019.11 is available in there different edition, with the KDE Plasma 5, Xfce, and MATE desktop environments. The PCLinuxOS 2019.11 KDE edition ships with the latest KDE Plasma 5.17.3 desktop environment, as well as the KDE Applications 19.08.3 and KDE Frameworks 5.64.0 open-source software suites.

On the other hand, the PCLinuxOS 2019.11 Xfce edition includes the latest Xfce 4.14 desktop environment with the Thunar 1.8.10, Xfburn 0.6.1, xfce4-whiskermenu-plugin 2.3.4, and xfce... (read more)

Red Hat Enterprise Linux and CentOS Now Patched Against Latest Intel CPU Flaws

Saturday 16th of November 2019 08:20:00 PM
Red Hat and CentOS have announced the availability of important kernel security updates for their Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and 7 and CentOS Linux 6 and 7 operating system series.

After responding to the latest security vulnerabilities affecting Intel CPU microarchitectures, Red Hat has released new Linux kernel security updates for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 operating systems to address the well-known ZombieLoad v2 flaw and other issues. The CentOS community also ported the updates for their CentOS Linux 6 and CentOS Linux 7 systems.

The security vulnerabilities patched in this new Linux kernel security update are Machine Check Error on Page Size Change (IFU) (CVE-2018-12207), TSX Transaction Asynchronous ... (read more)

First Major Update to Oracle Linux 8 Brings Enhanced Security, Latest Updates

Saturday 16th of November 2019 07:47:00 PM
Oracle announced the release and general availability of the first major update to the lasts Oracle Linux 8 operating system series.

Based on the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 release, Oracle Linux 8 Update 1 is here six months after the release of the Oracle Linux 8 operating system series, which adds a new distribution method combining BaseOS and Applications Streams. It adds updated components and enhanced security to better control and protect your installations on desktop and cloud.

"With Oracle Linux 8, the core operating environment and associated packages for a typical Oracle Linux 8 server are distributed through a combination of BaseOS and Applications Streams. BaseOS gives you a running user space for the operating environment. Application Streams provides a range of applications that were previously distributed in Software Collections, as well as other products and programs, ... (read more)

Android-x86 Project Finally Lets You Install Android 9 Pie on Your PC

Saturday 16th of November 2019 06:53:00 PM
The Android-x86 project finally lets users users install the Android 9 Pie mobile operating system on their personal computers with the upcoming Android-x86 9.0 release.

Android-x86 9.0 has recently entered developed, of course based on the Android 9 Pie (android-9.0.0_r50) operating system, and the first release candidate images are now available to download for 32-bit (x86) and 64-bit (x86_64) computers to let you run Android 9 Pie on your PC.

But Android-x86 9.0 doesn't only rebases the OS on Android 9 Pie, it also brings numerous enhancements like support for OpenGL ES 3.x hardware acceleration on AMD, Intel, Nvidia and QEMU (virgl) systems thanks to the latest Mesa 19.0.8 graphics stack, along with OpenGL ES 3.0 support for via SwiftShader for software rendering on unsupported GPUs.

Furthermore, Android-x86 9.0 promises support for hardware accelerated codecs on devices with Intel HD ... (read more)

Debian GNU/Linux 10.2 "Buster" Released with More Than 100 Bug & Security Fixes

Saturday 16th of November 2019 05:28:00 PM
The Debian Project announced today the availability of the second point release to its latest Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" operating system series, Debian 10.2.

Coming a little over two months after the first point release, Debian GNU/Linux 10.2 "Buster" is here as a new installation medium for those who want to deploy the operating system on new computers or reinstall and don't want to download hundreds of updates from the repositories after installation.

Debian GNU/Linux 10.2 "Buster" contains a total of 115 changes, consisting of 66 miscellaneous bug fixes and 49 security updates for various core packages and applications included in the main archives. These have read more)

The PinePhone Open Source Linux Smartphone Is Now Available for Pre-Order

Friday 15th of November 2019 10:00:00 AM
After being available only to developers interested in hacking the device, PINE64's PinePhone open source Linux smartphone is now available for pre-order and anyone can get one.

Even though the road to bring us the PinePhone has been a bit bumpy for PINE64, mostly due to the issues encountered during the manufacturing process of the developer units, which turned out to become a good thing as the feedback received was very positive, the device is now ready for early adoption by the mass.

Called the "Brave Heart" edition, this is the first batch of PinePhone units that will be delivered into the hands of regular people like you and me. And they're not an incomplete or rushed product as PINE64 did numerous in-house testing on the developer units and fixed all known and major bugs.

"We have carried out extensive in-house testing of prototypes and sent prototype phones to a number of key developers from partner projects," said PINE64. "We have addressed all known issue... (read more)

Debian Project Releases Linux Security Updates to Patch Latest Intel CPU Flaws

Thursday 14th of November 2019 05:55:00 PM
The Debian Project released new Linux kernel security updates for its supported Debian GNU/Linux releases to address the latest vulnerabilities affecting Intel CPU microarchitectures.

As reported earlier this week, four new security vulnerabilities have been discovered in the Linux kernel and with an impact on Intel CPUs, namely CVE-2019-11135, CVE-2018-12207, CVE-2019-0154 and CVE-2019-0155, which may lead to privilege escalation, information leak, as well as denial of service.

Following on the footsteps of read more)

Canonical Enhances the Reliability of Its Kubernetes for IoT, Multi-Cloud & Edge

Thursday 14th of November 2019 03:10:00 PM
Canonical today announced updates for its MicroK8s Kubernetes deployment to deliver high-availability clustering for edge, multi-cloud, and IoT (Internet of Things).

MicroK8s is an upstream Kubernetes deployment certified by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) and developed entirely by Canonical to run offline on your workstation or edge device for all your development, prototyping, and testing needs. MicroK8s is delivered as a snap, which makes it possible to run all Kubernetes services natively and comes bundled with all the libraries and binaries required.

The latest MicroK8s 1.16 release adds high-availability clustering by integrating enterprise SQL database through Canonical's in-house built Dqlite distributed SQL engine to enable rapid deployment of highly standardized small K8s clusters. Dqlite is designed to reduce memory footprint of the cluster in MicroK8s by embedding the database inside Kubernetes itself.

"The rapid rise of enterprise and edg... (read more)

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S12E33 – The Sentinel

    This week we’ve been to the Linux Application Summit in Barcelona. We round up news from the Ubuntu and desktop Linux community and bring you our picks from the wider tech news. It’s Season 12 Episode 33 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • Kubernetes and the misconception of multi-cloud portability
  • Linux 5.5 To Finally Expose NVMe Drive Temperatures Via HWMON

    Linux for years has supported monitoring NVMe drive temperatures when installing the nvme user-space utility and run as root, etc. But now finally with Linux 5.5 the kernel is supporting NVMe drive temperature reporting through the hardware monitoring "HWMON" infrastructure alongside other hardware sensors. Come the Linux 5.5 stable release in early 2020 is the NVMe HWMON support to allow reporting the current NVMe drive temperature sensor(s) and min/max thresholds via this kernel infrastructure. This in turn allows user-space to simply query the data over sysfs without the need for any utilities, no root requirement, and should gracefully work with the various programs that report HWMON sensor readings to Linux desktop users.

  • PHP 5.3 To PHP 7.4 Performance Benchmarks On AMD EPYC

    With the big PHP 7.4.0 release due out next week, yesterday we published our PHP 7.4.0 benchmarks using the near-final build for this annual update to PHP. Those benchmarks compared previous releases as far back as PHP 5.6. But out of curiosity after that article I went to do some benchmarks going back to PHP 5.3 through PHP 7.4 and PHP 8.0-dev. With the AMD EPYC 7642 server running Ubuntu 19.10 used in yesterday's article, I ran the final PHP 5.3/5.4/5.5 benchmarks added in to yesterday's data. So for those curious how the historical PHP5 performance compares to the imminent PHP 7.4, these benchmarks are for your enjoyment today.

  • Wine Patches Coming To Allow UMIP Emulation - Works Around Issues For Ryzen 3000

    Coming up this weekend with the Linux 5.4 kernel is emulation/spoofing of the SGDT/SIDT/SMSW instructions around UMIP for allowing newer 64-bit Windows games to run on Wine and Steam Play (Proton). With newer CPUs like the AMD Ryzen 3000 series that support UMIP, these instructions are not allowed to run in user-space with Wine due to UMIP. So while the first stable kernel release is about to land with this support, some Wine-based emulation not contingent on the kernel patches is also in the works.

  • The different way to check whether you are using a 32-bit or 64-bit version of Linux on your computer
  • KF6 Sprint - Day One

    Today we started our KF6 sprint at the MBition office in Berlin. Beside the people attending in person, we have David Faure joining us via web conference. Thanks already to the people at MBition that spend time on making it possible to host the sprint there. First stuff to be discussed were some high level things, like does the monthly release scheme work out well. Short answer: yes :) The short period works well, allows people to fix issues directly in frameworks and still have that reasonable fast provided to the users. And the overhead of release creation is low, thanks to automation.

  • Zidoo M9 is a Rockchip RK3399 TV Box/Mini PC/SBC with Dual OS Support

    Zidoo has launched several TV boxes running Android over the years, some of which we reviewed such as Zidoo X9 (2015), or Zidoo H6 Pro.

  • Goldman Sachs is planning on giving some of its most valuable software to Wall Street for free

    Goldman Sachs wants to give away some of its most valuable software. The investment bank spent countless hours over 14 years developing a platform called Alloy to help it access and analyze the growing set of financial databases being created across the firm. Now Goldman is taking the unusual step of making that program, as well as the language underlying it, available to the rest of Wall Street for free as open-source software in collaboration with a nonprofit called Finos. The software and language "have grown to become critical tools within our firm across the trade lifecycle that help us price, assess and evaluate risk, clear transactions, and perform regulatory reporting," said Neema Raphael, co-chief data officer at Goldman. By making it publicly available, "we'll unlock tremendous value for the industry when we co-develop and share models."

  • Open source transparency comes to root of trust hardware

    Geopolitics have put enterprise data centers in the crosshairs of international espionage. From all corners of the globe, hackers of all sorts, including those aligned with national spy agencies, are zeroing in on hardware roots of trust. For any computing platform, the root of trust is the ultimate line of defense against cybersecurity attacks. No matter how secure your operating system and applications appear to be, they are acutely vulnerable if running on a hardware platform whose root of trust has been compromised by an unauthorized party.

  • Cloud Print becomes the latest product to face Google death squad

    At the end of 2020, after over a decade in beta, Google will pick up its product-ending shotgun and take Cloud Print for a talk behind the back shed, from which it will never return. "Beginning January 1, 2021, devices across all operating systems will no longer be able to print using Google Cloud Print," Google said in a support note. "We recommend that over the next year, you identify an alternative solution and execute a migration strategy." Last week for its own Chrome OS operating system, Google added CUPS printing, which it will use instead of Cloud Print.

  • Google shuts down its Cloud Print service after 10-year Beta

    Google revealed plans to shut down Cloud Print, a cloud-based printing solution, at the end of 2020 permanently. The company launched Cloud Print back in 2010 as a solution to print from any Internet connected device to compatible printers. The main benefit of the solution was that users did not have to install printer drivers on their client devices and that devices did not need to be in the same local network as the printer. The solution enabled printing on devices without official support from the printer's manufacturer or drivers for that particular device. On Windows users could install the Google Cloud Printer application to add cloud printing functionality to the operating system.

  • Google Cloud Print will be shut down on December 31, 2020

    After offering printing from any device, from any location, to any web-connected printer with Cloud Print, Google is shutting down the service that has technically been a beta product since 2010. Cloud Print will be gone by the end of next year and users will need to find an alternative before December 31, 2020. Chrome OS, which originally relied on Cloud Print entirely for printing needs, eschewing the need to develop native printing controls, is now going full native. Chrome OS already handles some administrative tasks for printers that use the Common Unix Printing System (CUPS). Google promises to expand administrative options through the end of the year, and add more robust support for external print servers and other security policy administration in 2020. Since Chrome OS and its apps relied entirely on Cloud Print, Google will also be developing APIs for third-party developers to handle printing tasks.

Why You Should Be Using Linux

How many times have you been happily working away when, out of nowhere, Windows either forced a reboot to update, stopped responding, or completely crashed? With Linux, those events are a thing of the past. Because of the way Linux was designed, you (the user) have complete control over nearly everything. Say, for example, an application fails on you. Instead of that application taking the entire desktop along for the ride (an issue that often stumps even software development providers), you can log into what’s called a virtual console and force that crashed application closed via the command line. Yes, that does take a bit more skill than the average user possesses, but once you know how it’s done, it becomes second nature. The likelihood of that actually happening, however, is low. The few instances where this has happened to me was due to my using beta or “nightly” releases of software, which the average user wouldn’t be working with. Linux simply works and works with an almost unheard of reliability. Read more

Industrial-grade Linux OS gets Over-the-Air updates

Modern embedded systems need a reliable and secure way to deliver software updates remotely. Toradex aims to accomplish this by publishing critical operating system updates to customers with devices running TorizonCore, an easy-to-use industrial-grade Linux OS. The system will provide full control over which updates and when these updates are pushed to their devices by way of a web interface. Additionally, customers will be able to push their own updates to their devices using the same OTA system. Managing deployed devices is made easy by providing a high-level view of all devices and their current status. Grouping devices together into fleets is supported and makes managing updates for many devices easy. Every device publishes information up to the server which can prove useful for evaluating device health, inconsistencies in deployed devices, etc. Read more

SUSE/OpenSUSE Development Report

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2019/47

    Another week, in which openQA did block some of the snapshots – and some issues it was unfortunately not able to see. Anyway, during the week 2019/47 we have released three snapshot into the wild (1116, 1118 and 1119), containing those changes: Mesa 19.2.4: fixes critical rendering issues from earlier Mesa 19.2.3. As this rendering issue did not happen on all graphics adapters, openQA had no chance of spotting it Linux kernel 5.3.11 KDE Plasma 5.17.3 Subversion 1.13.0 binutils 2.33.1

  • YaST Team: Highlights of YaST Development Sprints 88 and 89

    A few weeks ago, we wrote about the new ItemSelector widget that is finding its way into YaST user interfaces. It turned out that just a simple on/off status is not enough in some cases, so we had to extend that concept. For example, software modules may have dependencies, and we want to show the difference between one that was explicitly selected by the user and one that was auto-selected because some other software module requires it. This kind of shook the foundations of the underlying classes; all of a sudden a bit is no longer just a bit, but it needs to be broken down into even smaller pieces. Well, we cheated; we now use integer values instead. Most of the class hierarchy still only uses 0 and 1, but the new YCustomStatusItemSelector also supports using higher numbers for application-defined purposes. For each possible status value, the application defines the name of the icon to be displayed (for graphical UIs like the Qt UI), the text equivalent (for text mode / the NCurses UI), and an optional nextStatus which tells the widget what status to cycle to when the user changes the status of an item with a mouse click or with the keyboard. A value of -1 lets the application handle this. So this is not a one-trick-pony that is useful only for that one use case (the software modules), but a generic tool that might find good uses in other places all over YaST as well.