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Updated: 32 weeks 4 days ago

GitHub Expands Free Feature Access, Slices Other Costs

Thursday 16th of April 2020 06:40:29 PM
GitHub has lowered its pricing plans drastically and made its core features free for everyone, even for private development. GitHub CEO Nat Friedman announced a plan that has been in the works for some time, noting that the changes were not related to the COVID-19 worldwide health crisis. The new structure allows access to GitHub's private repositories with unlimited collaborators for all GitHub accounts. Microsoft purchased GitHub, a software hosting and version-control platform, for $7.5 billion in June 2018.

MakuluLinux Flash 2020 Could Be an Xfce Desktop Game-Changer

Tuesday 14th of April 2020 08:10:03 PM
MakuluLinux Flash 2020 is a traditional/retro style Linux operating system that focuses on ease of use, comfort and stability. It uses a highly tweaked Xfce desktop environment with features previously not seen in standard Xfce integrations. The Xfce desktop is known for its speed and flexibility, but given the amount of eye candy and other enhancements built into Flash 2020, its performance is neither degraded nor overtaxed. MakuluLinux Flash offers 24 varieties of different-colored themes and a unique selection of in-house background images.

LMDE4: How Much Does Debian Matter?

Friday 3rd of April 2020 05:06:30 PM
Linux Mint Debian 4, or LMDE4, is now available. Does it really matter whether you run this latest Linux Mint release, based on Debian Linux, instead of Linux Mint 19.3, based on Ubuntu Linux? The answer depends on two things. One is your personal computing philosophy regarding refresh cycles and leading-edge technologies. The other is what you want in terms of a computing experience -- such as new features, reliability, performance and style. Also consider a related question: How does LMDE4 compare to running pure Debian Linux?

3D Printers Join Arsenal of COVID-19 Weapons

Thursday 26th of March 2020 06:33:30 PM
The worldwide 3D printing community is stepping up to alleviate the shortage of medical equipment needed to battle the coronavirus pandemic. Participants include entrepreneurs and hackers, companies in the 3D printing industry, automobile makers, aircraft manufacturers, universities, and even a shipbuilder. Some are offering free 3D printer files for download and use. Others are designing equipment. Still others are offering to produce medical equipment for the cost of the materials.

AryaLinux Provides the Building Blocks for a Unique Linux Experience

Thursday 26th of March 2020 11:00:00 AM
AryaLinux is something different, and when it comes to Linux operating systems, different can be very intriguing. Arya is both a distribution and a platform. That means you can use it as is or turn it into a branded computing system to meet your own specialized needs. Not all potential users want or need to turn Arya into their own Linux build. However, if you like tinkering or actually can benefit from creating your own computing platform, you can. The end result is a fine-tuned computing platform.

Zorin OS Core Makes GNOME More Comfortable

Friday 20th of March 2020 06:05:19 PM
Zorin OS 15.2, released on March 8, adds an impressive selection of upgrades and improvements to an already well-oiled Linux operating system. Since its debut in July 2009 Zorin OS cofounder Artyom Zorin has hawked his distribution as an ideal Microsoft Windows replacement. That description is a strong selling point for this easier-to-use computing platform, but anyone looking for a perfect Windows replacement will be disappointed. Of course, no Linux distro can be an actual Microsoft clone -- nor should it be.

Open Source Tech Rushes to Front Lines of COVID-19 War

Wednesday 18th of March 2020 07:50:40 PM
Open Source software, once the scorn of Microsoft and profit-seeking software developers, is playing an active role in efforts to combat COVID-19's spread. Several open source projects are assisting health providers and helping people mitigate some of the hardships associated with the pandemic. Often, open source accomplishments in the public health and government services fields go unreported. This time, however, in response to COVID-19's worldwide assault, open source technologies are ramping up to pursue potentially world-saving results.

Crowdsourcing App Takes Aim at COVID-19

Wednesday 18th of March 2020 04:58:59 PM
Researchers into the COVID-19 virus have a new source of distributed computing power: crowdsourcing. Usually crowdsourcing involves information or opinion gathering, but in this case it involves computing power. By installing the Folding@home software program, anyone with a computer, gaming console, or even some phones and compute cycles to spare can contribute to the work of coronavirus researchers around the world. Folding@home is a distributed computing project at Washington University in St. Louis.

Report: Open Source Vulnerabilities Rampant in Popular Projects

Thursday 12th of March 2020 07:31:32 PM
Open source vulnerabilities rose by nearly 50 percent in 2019 over the previous year, based on a new report. Common vulnerabilities rated as high or critical severity were found in all of the most popular open source projects, according to the WhiteSource 2020 annual report, "The State of Open Source Security Vulnerabilities." The vulnerability rate is expected to continue rising. As open source usage continues to grow, so does the number of eyes focused on open source security research.

How to Run the Linux KDE Desktop on a Chromebook

Wednesday 11th of March 2020 06:22:39 PM
Chromebooks with the right stuff inside now are able to install and run a complete Linux experience with the KDE desktop without giving up the Chrome OS on the same device. It is not yet flawless, but it does create a hybrid computing platform that lets Linux and Android apps coexist on top of the Chrome OS. I do not mean flashing the Galium OS distribution as a replacement for Chrome OS. I have done that on an end-of-life early Chromebook with usable results. However, I mean running a complete Linux graphical environment with the KDE desktop.

Elive Beta With Enlightenment Is Brilliant, but Don't Get Lost in the Maze

Friday 6th of March 2020 12:00:00 PM
Elive is one of the most unusual Linux distributions you are likely to encounter. Elive Linux is an awesome integration of the Debian Linux base and the Enlightenment desktop. The combination provides a uniquely powerful and flexible computing platform. Its name suggests part of what makes this distro unlike the few others that have the Enlightenment desktop baked in. Elive is actually a live session environment that is capable of providing persistent memory so you can save settings and data without fully installing it to a hard drive.

Netrunner Linux Still Goes Its Own Way at 'Twenty'

Friday 28th of February 2020 07:11:15 PM
Netrunner "Twenty" is a birthday release offering that makes what was good even better. Developers released Netrunner 20.01 on Feb. 23 with the latest stable Debian 10.3 "Buster" base and the KDE Plasma desktop. This release marks the distro's 20th birthday in a way. Code-named "Twenty," the 20.01 release is the 20th upgrade of the Netrunner project over its 10-year history. It is packed with the latest KDE desktop packages, new theme tweaks, and a collection of GTK and Qt/KDE programs.

Linux-Powered Azure IoT Security Platform Arrives

Tuesday 25th of February 2020 06:38:10 PM
Microsoft has announced the general availability of its Azure Sphere secure IoT service. It first introduced Azure Sphere in 2018, opting to use its own version of a Linux operating system instead of Windows 10 to drive its new Azure Sphere OS to securely connect Internet of Things devices. Azure Sphere is a platform connecting microcontroller units embedded within IoT devices. The platform operates a new MCU crossover class that combines both real-time and application processors with built-in Microsoft security technology and connectivity.

Freespire 6.0: A Return to GNOME2's Simpler Linux Days

Friday 21st of February 2020 07:36:58 PM
If you are tired of distro hopping and want a computing platform that works without drama, check out the latest Freespire Linux release. Freespire, a U.S.-based distribution built on Debian/Ubuntu, is a no-nonsense OS that is uncomplicated to install and use. Freespire is released biannually. Developers on Feb. 11 released the latest MATE edition, the first of two updated versions. KDE will come out soon. Two age-old sayings are apt when it comes to Linux distributions: "Something old is new again," and "What goes around, comes around."

Some Android Malware Can Break Your Phone When You Delete It

Friday 21st of February 2020 12:00:00 PM
Since Android's unveiling in 2007, the platform has stayed true to its commitment to provide open and free source code. The source code is freely available to developers and device manufacturers who can, at their own discretion, install the software without worrying about the hassles of licensing fees. The consequent reduction in fees allows device manufacturers to bring Android devices to the market at significantly lower prices than the competition, with the average price of an Android smartphone almost US$400 cheaper than an iPhone.

Unsigned Firmware Puts Windows, Linux Peripherals at Risk

Wednesday 19th of February 2020 08:23:07 PM
Eclypsium has released new research that identifies and confirms unsigned firmware in WiFi adapters, USB hubs, trackpads and cameras used in Windows and Linux computer and server products from Lenovo, Dell, HP and other major manufacturers. Eclypsium also demonstrated a successful attack on a server via a network interface card with unsigned firmware used by each of the big three server manufacturers. The demonstration shows the exposed attack vector once firmware on any of these components is infected using the issues the report describes.

Simplicity Does More Than Simplify Linux

Friday 14th of February 2020 07:34:37 PM
If you want a new Linux distro catering to gaming, check out the Simplicity Linux Gaming release. If you prefer a general-purpose computing platform without a gaming focus, try Simplicity's revamped release. Either way, you will experience a no-nonsense Linux OS that requires no assembly. Simplicity Linux, originating in the UK, is a Devuan-based distribution with Cinnamon as the default window manager desktop environment. Devuan is a fork of Debian Linux that replaces the systemd initialization processes.

MakuluLinux LinDoz Offers Windows Comfort Zone, but It's All Linux Under the Hood

Friday 7th of February 2020 05:00:00 PM
After a long delay, a new MakuluLinux LinDoz release is pending last-minute finishing touches and is a week -- if not days -- away, according to developer Jacque Montague Raymer. The new upgrade is designed to make using Linux easier than ever. Recently, Raymer discussed the trials and tribulations he faced in maintaining and advancing his Linux line of distros. He revealed a process that no doubt is similar to what confronts many software developers who step into the crowded and financially challenging field of Linux operating system creation.

The Two Faces of Open Source: ECT News Roundtable, Episode 5

Thursday 6th of February 2020 07:00:00 PM
The open source software movement has evolved dramatically over the past two decades. Many businesses that once considered open source a threat now recognize its value. In spite of increased enthusiasm among enterprises, consumer interest by and large has not materialized. With large companies increasingly embracing open source, what does it mean to be a part of the free and open source software, or FOSS, "community"? Why have consumers been so slow to adopt open source software? Our roundtable of industry insiders tackled those questions.

Solus Shines With Plasma Desktop Options

Friday 31st of January 2020 07:40:22 PM
Solus, an independent Linux distro based in Ireland, is built from scratch on the Linux kernel and the flagship Budgie desktop. This week's release brings the KDE Plasma desktop to the growing Solus family. Solus uses a rolling release that frequently updates system files and software packages to eliminate the need to periodically reinstall the operating system when new ISO or installation files are issued. Updated ISOs are available on a predetermined developmental cycle so new users have immediate access to the most recent content.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

  • Five practical guides for managing Linux terminal and commands [Ed: People from Linux Foundation are renaming GNU programs "LINUX"]
  • Add a subcommand showing GNU Guix history of all packages

    Hello, everyone! I'm Magali and for the next three months, I'll be an Outreachy intern in the GNU Guix community. As part of my Outreachy application process, I made my first ever contribution to Free Software adding a package to Guix, and since then I'm eager to begin contributing even more. My task for this three-month period is to add a subcommand showing the history of all packages. Although Guix makes it possible to install and have an older version of a package, it isn't as easy to find, for example, the commit related to these versions. The subcommand I'll implement will be something like guix git log. The idea is that, for instance, when the user invokes guix git log --oneline | grep msmtp, a list with all the commits, one per line, related to msmtp, will be shown.

  • WildFly server configuration with Ansible collection for JCliff, Part 2

    Welcome to the second part of this series introducing Ansible collection for JCliff. This new extension is designed for fine-tuning WildFly or Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (JBoss EAP) configurations using Ansible. In Part 1, we installed JCliff and its Ansible collection and prepared our environment. We set up a minimal, working playbook for installing JCliff on the target system. In this article, we will focus on configuring a few of our WildFly server’s subsystems.

  • Bpytop on openSUSE

    I recently published an article about how great Bashtop is on openSUSE, and when I was nearly done with it, I was told about Bpytop. Since I was going through the final edit, I didn’t just want to dump what I did before but rather, follow it up with Bpytop. I am not sure how far behind the curve I am now and maybe there is something even cooler out there but before anyone tells me what the latest hotness is in terminal, system monitoring applications, I am feverishly writing about this What is so great about Bpytop? If you are a nerd about what your system is doing and like to see the numbers, charts graphs, etc, and you have previously enjoyed Bashtop, Bpytop is going to send tingles of joy down your finger tips. The little bits of information it gives you from CPU load, load average, and frequency is superb. The chart it produces on the CPU usage looks fantastic and really makes you wonder how they accomplished this when it is only in text mode. Truly a feat of terminal engineering!

  • Work-around in Linux to switch between single-sided and double-sided printing | Fitzcarraldo's Blog

    I use Gentoo Linux on my laptop, and have drivers installed for quite a few printer manufacturers and models, as I work in multiple offices and they have a wide range of printers and MFPs. To date I have had no trouble printing single-sided (‘simplex’) and double-sided (‘duplex’) documents on the printers that support duplex printing. However, one of the offices I have been working in recently has a Konica Minolta bizhub C368, a floor-standing MFP, and the printer in this MFP did not enable me to switch between single-sided and double-sided printing even though Windows users in the same office could. This article explains how I managed to switch between the two printing modes.

  • [Older] LFCS - Scheduling Tasks

    Sometimes it is necessary to have tasks execute at specific times. Automating tasks to run at specific times can be a very necessary administrative function. Even on a home system tasks can be automated to reduce your time from ‘babysitting’ your system.

  • Everything you need to know about Kubernetes namespaces. - UX Techno

    Kubernetes namespaces is a virtual cluster being created within the actual Kubernetes cluster. This will bring separation between the different Kubernetes objects such as Pods, deployments and service etc. This will comes handy in order to separate your cluster environment wise or among the different teams.

Daiki Ueno: What’s new in GnuTLS 3.7.0

On behalf of the GnuTLS team, I am pleased to present GnuTLS 3.7.0, the first cut of the 3.7 series. This is the result of several months of planning and work by 25 contributors and includes feature enhancements and behavior changes, such as removal of deprecated functions and tightening of system requirements. In this entry, I will try to detail some notable features in the release. API for on-demand CA certificates retrieval During the TLS authentication phase, the server typically presents a chain of X.509 certificates, from the end-entity certificate to the trusted CA certificate. The AIA extension allows the server to omit certain portion of the certificate chain, by pointing to the location where the client can download the missing certificates. Although GnuTLS provides a means to override the certificate verification logic completely through callbacks, this task is error-prone and thus desired to be supported natively. Sahana Prasad introduced the new set of API that allow applications to safely complement the certificate chain. The API is already being used in glib-networking. Read more

Kernel: Zen 3, Bootlin and Collabora

  • EPYC Zen 3 CPU Support Coming To Linux's AMD_Energy Driver - Phoronix

    In addition to AMD Zen 1/2/3 PowerCap RAPL support coming for the Linux 5.11 kernel, the hwmon-next Git branch has also queued initial support for Zen 3 processors within the AMD_Energy driver. The AMD_Energy driver was introduced earlier this year and merged for Linux 5.8 for easily exposing AMD CPU energy metrics -- albeit the list of supported CPU models was later restricted to EPYC CPUs.

  • Videos and slides of Bootlin's talks at Live Embedded Event 2020 - Bootlin's blog

    Yesterday, Bootlin co-organized and participated to the first edition of Live Embedded Event, a new online conference dedicated to embedded systems topics. In addition to co-organizing the event, we also gave four different talks at this conference, and we are happy to share the slides and videos of our talks.

  • Linux 5.11 Adding An "Inhibited" Feature To Temporarily Disregard Select Input Devices - Phoronix

    This input inhibited property is being led by Google ChromeOS engineers in conjunction with Collabora and the initial use-case for inhibiting input from select devices is a 2-in-1/laptop use-case where the keyboard may be folded under the screen for creating a tablet-like experience. This new property allows for such a property to be created in user-space so that when such a keyboard folding event occurs it could inhibit the input from that given device. Other use-cases will also surely materialize.

Open Hardware/Modding: Open-Source Firmware Conference (OSFC 2020), Arduino, Raspberry Pi and PINE64

  • AMD Is Making Progress On Open-Source Firmware - Initially With OpenBMC - Phoronix

    While we are still waiting to see what AMD might do for returning to open-source AGESA or better supporting Coreboot and the like, they are making some inroads with open-source firmware support -- beyond the context of Chromebooks where they continue to engage due to Google's engineering requirements. AMD is working to "align with the industry direction of open-source firmware stacks" with their initial focus being on open-source OpenBMC firmware support for their server platforms. AMD's Supreeth Venkatesh spoke at this week's virtual Open-Source Firmware Conference (OSFC 2020) on the work they are pursuing around OpenBMC. It was acknowledged that this work is being done due to the industry direction these days of preferring open-source firmware stacks (and being "a good open-source citizen") but stopped short of outlining any other open-source firmware plans at this time outside of OpenBMC. Given the customer interest and industry trends they have been working to support open-source OpenBMC support on the AMD server reference platforms. From the presentation, it looks like Twitter's engineering team has been involved with the bring-up and among the interested users but surely other key industry players are also taking note.

  • $25 TTGO T5 4.7-inch e-Paper Display comes with ESP32 WiFi & Bluetooth SoC

    We’ve very recently covered M5paper IoT development kit based on ESP32 WiSoC, and equipped with a 4.7-inch touchscreen e-Ink display together with a 1,150mAh battery all nicely packed into an enclosure. It looks great, but costs $69, so if you’d like to integrate this type of ESP32 connected display into your own project at a lower cost, you may be interested in TTGO T5 4.7-inch e-Paper display with 16 gray levels fitted with an ESP32-WROVER-E module with 16MB flash, and 8MB PSRAM. [...] The company says the display can be programmed with the Arduino IDE, ESP-IDF or MicroPython, but they only provide sample code for Arduino based on EPDiy E-Paper Driver project. Typical applications listed by LilyGO include desktop weather station, STEM education, and IoT device.

  • Private Git Web Portal in Raspberry PI With Gogs
  • Pine Store Community Pricing & Online Retail Stores

    In 2021 you’ll see online retail Pine stores open in Europe, North America and possibly also worldwide at a later stage. Let me start by making one thing clear – the current Pine Store isn’t going away and the pricing in the Pine Store will remain unchanged. You’ll always be able to buy and pre-order your devices from pine64.com at a community-oriented price point. The retail stores will function alongside the Pine Store, not replace it, and offer a different customer experience. In this blog I’ll explain the rationale behind this strategy.

    PINE64 is not a business

    First things first – PINE64 is a community, not a business, and the Pine Store’s sole purpose is to serve this community by providing FOSS development-friendly hardware. Sales numbers and revenue are not, and never were, a driving force behind this project; making the next fun and often experimental device was and still is. Some devices, such as the original Pinebook, were even sold at a loss at times – simply because we knew people wanted one. Seriously.