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Updated: 8 hours 37 min ago

Six more devices from ThinkPenguin, Inc. now FSF-certified to Respect Your Freedom

Thursday 16th of May 2019 05:44:36 PM

This is ThinkPenguin's second batch of devices to receive RYF certification this spring. The FSF announced certification of seven other devices from ThinkPenguin on March 21st. This latest collection of devices makes ThinkPenguin the retailer with the largest catalog of RYF-certified devices.

"It's unfortunate that so many of even the simplest devices out there have surprise proprietary software requirements. RYF is an antidote for that. It connects ethical shoppers concerned about their freedom with companies offering options respecting that freedom," said the FSF's executive director, John Sullivan.

Today's certifications expands the availability of RYF-certified peripheral devices. The Penguin USB 2.0 External USB Stereo Sound Adapter and the 5.1 Channels 24-bit 96KHz PCI Express Audio Sound Card help users get the most of their computers in terms of sound quality. For wireless connectivity, ThinkPenguin offers the Wireless N PCI Express Dual-Band Mini Half-Height Card and Penguin Wireless N Mini PCIe Card. For users with an older printer, the USB to Parallel Printer Cable can let them continue to use it with their more current hardware. Finally, the PCIe eSATA / SATA 6Gbps Controller Card help users to connect to external eSATA devices as well as internal SATA.

"I've spent the last 14 years working on projects aimed at making free software adoption easy for everyone, but the single greatest obstacle over the past 20 years has not been software. It's been hardware. The RYF program helps solve this problem by linking users to trustworthy sources where they can get hardware guaranteed to work on GNU/Linux, and be properly supported using free software," said Christopher Waid, founder and CEO of ThinkPenguin.

While ThinkPenguin has consistently sought certification since the inception of the RYF program -- gaining their first certification in 2013, and adding several more over the years since -- the pace at which they are gaining certifications now eclipses all past efforts.

"ThinkPenguin continues to impress with the rapid expansion of their catalog of RYF-certified devices. Adding 14 new devices in a little over a month shows their dedication to the RYF certification program and the protection of users it represents," said the FSF's licensing and compliance manager, Donald Robertson, III.

To learn more about the Respects Your Freedom certification program, including details on the certification of these ThinkPenguin devices, please visit https://fsf.org/ryf.

Retailers interested in applying for certification can consult https://www.fsf.org/resources/hw/endorsement/criteria.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at https://fsf.org and https://gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

About ThinkPenguin, Inc.

Started by Christopher Waid, founder and CEO, ThinkPenguin, Inc., is a consumer-driven company with a mission to bring free software to the masses. At the core of the company is a catalog of computers and accessories with broad support for GNU/Linux. The company provides technical support for end-users and works with the community, distributions, and upstream projects to make GNU/Linux all that it can be.

Media Contacts

Donald Robertson, III
Licensing and Compliance Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
licensing@fsf.org

ThinkPenguin, Inc.
+1 (888) 39 THINK (84465) x703
media@thinkpenguin.com

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