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Planet Debian - https://planet.debian.org/
Updated: 3 hours 21 min ago

Holger Levsen: 20200802-debconf4

Sunday 2nd of August 2020 05:40:54 PM
DebConf4

This tshirt is 16 years old and from DebConf4. Again, I should probably wash it at 60 celcius for once...

DebConf4 was my 2nd DebConf and took place in Porto Alegre, Brasil.

Like many DebConfs, it was a great opportunity to meet people: I remember sitting in the lobby of the venue and some guy asked me what I did in Debian and I told him about my little involvements and then asked him what he was doing, and he told me he wanted to become involved in Debian again, after getting distracted away. His name was Ian Murdock...

DebConf4 also had a very cool history session in the hallway track (IIRC, but see below) with Bdale Garbee, Ian Jackson and Ian Murdock and with a young student named Biella Coleman busy writing notes.

That same hallway also saw the kickoff meeting of the Debian Women project, though sadly today http://tinc.debian.net ("there's no cabal") only shows an apache placeholder page and not a picture of that meeting.

DebCon4 was also the first time I got a bit involved in preparing DebConf, together with Jonas Smedegaard I've set up some computers there, using FAI. I had no idea that this was the start of me contributing to DebConfs for text ten years.

And of course I also saw some talks, including one which I really liked, which then in turn made me notice there were no people doing video recordings, which then lead to something...

I missed the group picture of this one. I guess it's important to me to mention it because I've met very wonderful people at this DebConf... (some mentioned in this post, some not. You know who you are!)

Afterwards some people stayed in Porto Alegre for FISL, where we saw Lawrence Lessing present Creative Commons to the world for the first time. On the flight back I sat next to a very friendly guy from Poland and we talked almost the whole flight and then we never saw each other again, until 15 years later in Asia...

Oh, and then, after DebConf4, I used IRC for the first time. And stayed in the #debconf4 IRC channel for quite some years

Finally, DebConf4 and more importantly FISL, which was really big (5000 people?) and after that, the wizard of OS conference in Berlin (which had a very nice talk about Linux in different places in the world, illustrating the different states of 'first they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win'), made me quit my job at a company supporting Windows- and Linux-setups as I realized I'd better start freelancing with Linux-only jobs. So, once again, my life would have been different if I would not have attended these events!

Note: yesterdays post about DebConf3 was thankfully corrected twice. This might well happen to this post too!

Enrico Zini: Libreoffice presentation tips

Sunday 2nd of August 2020 01:00:00 PM
Snap guides

Dragging from the rulers does not always create snap guides. If it doesn't, click on the slide background, "Snap guides", "Insert snap guide". In my case, after the first snap guide was manually inserted, it was possible to drag new one from the rulers.

Master slides How to edit a master slide
  • Show master slides side pane
  • Right click on master slide
  • Edit Master...
  • An icon appears in the toolbar: "Close Master View"
  • Apply to all slides might not apply to the first slide created as the document was opened
Change styles in master slide

Do not change properties of text by selecting placeholder text in the Master View. Instead, open the Styles and formatting sidebar, and edit the styles in there.

This means the style changes are applied to pages in all layouts, not just the "Title, Content" layout that is the only one editable in the "Master View".

How to duplicate a master slide

There seems to be no feature implemented for this, but you can do it, if you insist:

  • Save a copy of the document
  • Rename the master slide
  • Drag a slide, that uses the renamed master slide, from the copy of the document to the original one

It's needed enough that someone made a wikihow: https://www.wikihow.com/Copy-a-LibreOffice-Impress-Master-Slide archive.org

How to change the master slide for a layout that is not "Title, Content"

I could not find a way to do it, but read on for a workaround.

I found an ask.libreoffice.org question that went unanswered.

I asked on #libreoffice on IRC and got no answer:

Hello. I'm doing the layout for a presentation in impress, and I can edit all sorts of aspects of the master slide. It seems that I can only edit the "Title, Content" layout of the master slide, though. I'd like to edit, for example, the "Title only" layout so that the title appears in a different place than the top of the page. Is it possible to edit specific layouts in a master page?

In the master slide editor it seems impossible to select a layout, for example.

Alternatively I tried creating multiple master slides, but then if I want to create a master slide for a title page, there's no way to remove the outline box, or the title box.

My work around has been to create multiple master slides, one for each layout. For a title layout, I moved the outline box into a corner, and one has to remove it manually after create a new slide.

There seems to be no way of changing the position of elements not found in the "Title, Content" layout, like "Subtitle". On the other hand, given that one's working with an entirely different master slide, one can abuse the outline box as a subtitle.

Note that if you later decide to change a style element for all the slides, you'll need to go propagate the change to the "Styles and Formatting" menu of all master slides you're using.

Andrew Cater: Debian 10.5 media testing - 202001082250 - last few debian-live images being tested for amd64 - Calamares issue - Post 5 of several.

Sunday 2nd of August 2020 12:59:49 PM
Last few debian-live images being tested for amd64. We have found a bug with the debian-live Gnome flavour. This specifically affects installs after booting from the live media and then installing to the machine using  the Calamares installer found on the desktop. The bug was introduced as a fix for one issue that has produced further buggy behaviour as a result.

Fixes are known - we've had highvoltage come and debug them with us - but will not be put out with this release but will wait for the 10.6 release which will allow for a longer time for debugging overall.
You can still run from the live-media, you can still install with the standard Debian installers found in the menu of the live-media disk - this is _only_ a limited time issue with the Calamares installer. At this point in the release cycle, it's been judged better to release the images as they are - with known and documented issues - than to try and debug them in a hurry and risk damaging or delaying a stable point release.

Enrico Zini: Gender, inclusive communities, and dragonflies

Sunday 2nd of August 2020 09:32:10 AM

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dragonfly#Sex_ratios:

Sex ratios

The sex ratio of male to female dragonflies varies both temporally and spatially. Adult dragonflies have a high male-biased ratio at breeding habitats. The male-bias ratio has contributed partially to the females using different habitats to avoid male harassment.

As seen in Hine's emerald dragonfly (Somatochlora hineana), male populations use wetland habitats, while females use dry meadows and marginal breeding habitats, only migrating to the wetlands to lay their eggs or to find mating partners.

Unwanted mating is energetically costly for females because it affects the amount of time that they are able to spend foraging.

Molly de Blanc: busy busy

Saturday 1st of August 2020 09:15:24 PM

I’ve been working with Karen Sandler over the past few months on the first draft of the Declaration of Digital Autonomy. Feedback welcome, please be constructive. It’s a pretty big deal for me, and feels like the culmination of a lifetime of experiences and the start of something new.

We talked about it at GUADEC and HOPE. We don’t have any other talks scheduled yet, but are available for events, meetups, dinner parties, and b’nai mitzvahs.

Andrew Cater: Debian 10.5 media testing - 202008012055 - post 4 of several

Saturday 1st of August 2020 09:01:30 PM
We've more or less finished testing on the Debian install images. Now moving on to the debian-live images. Bugs found and being triaged live as I type. Lots of typing and noises in the background of the video conference. Now at about 12-14 hours in on this for some of the participants. Lots of good work still going on, as ever.

Andrew Cater: Debian 10.5 media testing - pause for supper - 202001081715 - post 3 of several

Saturday 1st of August 2020 05:37:10 PM
Various of the folk doing this have taken a food break until 1900 local. A few glitches, a few that needed to be tried over again - but it's all going fairly well.
It is likely that at least one of the CD images will be dropped. The XFCE desktop install CD for i386 is now too large to fit on CD media. The netinst .iso files / the DVD 1 file / any of the larger files available via Jigdo will all help you achieve the same result.

There are relatively few machines that are i386 architecture only - it might be appropriate for people to use 64 bit amd64 from this point onwards as pure i386 machines are now approaching ten years old as a minimum. If you do need a graphical user environment for a pure i386 machine, it can be installed by using an expert install or using tasksel in the installation process.

Holger Levsen: 20200801-debconf3

Saturday 1st of August 2020 05:28:28 PM
DebConf3

This tshirt is 17 years old and from DebConf3. I should probably wash it at 60 celcius for once...

DebConf3 was my first DebConf and took place in Oslo, Norway, in 2003. I was very happy to be invited, like any Debian contributor at that time, and that Debian would provide food and accomodation for everyone. Accomodation was sleeping on the floor in some classrooms of an empty school and I remember having tasted grasshoppers provided by a friendly Gunnar Wolf there, standing in line on the first day with the SSH maintainer (OMG!1 (update: I originally wrote here that it wasn't Colin back then, but Colin mailed me to say that he was indeed maintaining SSH even back then, so I've met a previous maintainer there)) and meeting the one Debian person I had actually worked with before: Thomas Lange or MrFAI (update: Thomas also mailed me and said this was at DebConf5). In Oslo I also was exposed to Skolelinux / Debian Edu for the first time, saw a certain presentation from the FTP masters and also noticed some people recording the talks, though as I learned later these videos were never released to the public. And there was this fiveteen year old called Toresbe, who powered on the PDP's which were double his age. And then actually made use of them. And and and.

I'm very happy I went to this DebConf. Without going my Debian journey would have been very different today. Thanks to everyone who made this such a welcoming event. Thanks to anyone who makes any event welcoming!

Andrew Cater: Debian 10.5 media testing - continuing quite happily - 202001081320 - post 2 of several

Saturday 1st of August 2020 05:24:03 PM
We've now settled into a reasonable rhythm: RattusRattus and Isy and Sledge all working away hard in Cambridge: Schweer in Germany and me here in Cheltenham.
Lots of chat backwards and forwards and a good deal of work being done, as ever.
It's really good to be back in the swing of it and we owe thanks to folk for setting up infrastructure for us to use for video chat, which makes a huge difference: even though I know what they're like, it's still good to see my colleagues.

Andrew Cater: Debian 10.5 media testing process started 202008011145 - post 1 of several.

Saturday 1st of August 2020 01:01:52 PM
The media testing process has started slightly late. There will be a _long_ testing process over much of the day: the final media image releases are likely to be at about 0200-0300UTC tomorrow.
Just settling in for a long day of testing: as ever, it's good to be chatting with my Debian colleagues in Cambridge and with Schweer in Germany. It's going to be a hot one - 30 Celsius (at least) and high humidity for all of us.
EDIT: Corrected for UTC :)

Andrew Cater: Debian 10.5 Buster point release 20200801 - all of the fixes :)

Saturday 1st of August 2020 11:13:56 AM
The point release is happening today for Debian Buster 10.5. This is an important release because it incorporates all the recent security fixes from the latest GRUB / Secure Boot "Boothole" security problems.
Behind the scenes, there has been a lot of work to get this right: a release subject to an embargo to allow all the Linux releases to co-ordinate this as far as possible, lots of consistent effort, lots of cooperation - the very best of Free/Libre/Open Source working together.
Secure Boot shims are signed with a different key to go to upstream this time around: in due course, when revocation of old, insecure code happens to plug the security hole, older media may be deny-listed. All the updates for all the affected packages (listed in https://www.debian.org/security/2020-GRUB-UEFI-SecureBoot/ ) are included in this release.

This has been a major wake-up call: the work behind the scenes has meant that each affected Linux distribution will be in a much better position going forward and working together is always good.

Utkarsh Gupta: FOSS Activites in July 2020

Saturday 1st of August 2020 09:00:00 AM

Here’s my (tenth) monthly update about the activities I’ve done in the F/L/OSS world.

Debian

This was my 17th month of contributing to Debian. I became a DM in late March last year and a DD last Christmas! \o/

Well, this month I didn’t do a lot of Debian stuff, like I usually do, however, I did a lot of things related to Debian (indirectly via GSoC)!

Anyway, here are the following things I did this month:

Uploads and bug fixes: Other $things:
  • Mentoring for newcomers.
  • FTP Trainee reviewing.
  • Moderation of -project mailing list.
  • Sponsored php-twig for William, ruby-growl, ruby-xmpp4r, and uby-uniform-notifier for Cocoa, sup-mail for Iain, and node-markdown-it for Sakshi.
GSoC Phase 2, Part 2!

In May, I got selected as a Google Summer of Code student for Debian again! \o/
I am working on the Upstream-Downstream Cooperation in Ruby project.

The first three blogs can be found here:

Also, I log daily updates at gsocwithutkarsh2102.tk.

Whilst the daily updates are available at the above site^, I’ll breakdown the important parts of the later half of the second month here:

  • Marc Andre, very kindly, helped in fixing the specs that were failing earlier this month. Well, the problem was with the specs, but I am still confused how so. Anyway..
  • Finished documentation of the second cop and marked the PR as ready to be reviewed.
  • David reviewed and suggested some really good changes and I fixed/tweaked that PR as per his suggestion to finally finish the last bits of the second cop, RelativeRequireToLib.
  • Merged the PR upon two approvals and released it as v0.2.0!

Paul Wise: FLOSS Activities July 2020

Saturday 1st of August 2020 12:58:13 AM
Focus

This month I didn't have any particular focus. I just worked on issues in my info bubble.

Changes Issues Review Administration
  • Debian wiki: unblock IP addresses, approve accounts, reset email addresses
Communication Sponsors

The purple-discord, ifenslave and psqlodbc work was sponsored by my employer. All other work was done on a volunteer basis.

Junichi Uekawa: August and feels like it finally.

Saturday 1st of August 2020 12:54:04 AM
August and feels like it finally. July didn't feel like July and felt like June because it rained so much. This is summer.

Ben Hutchings: Debian LTS work, July 2020

Friday 31st of July 2020 10:40:00 PM

I was assigned 20 hours of work by Freexian's Debian LTS initiative, but only worked 5 hours this month and returned the remainder to the pool.

Now that Debian 9 'stretch' has entered LTS, the stretch-backports suite will be closed and no longer updated. However, some stretch users rely on the newer kernel version provided there. I prepared to add Linux 4.19 to the stretch-security suite, alongside the standard package of Linux 4.9. I also prepared to update the firmware-nonfree package so that firmware needed by drivers in Linux 4.19 will also be available in stretch's non-free section. Both these updates will be based on the packages in stretch-backports, but needed some changes to avoid conflicts or regressions for users that continue using Linux 4.9 or older non-Debian kernel versions. I will upload these after the Debian 10 'buster' point release.

Chris Lamb: Free software activities in July 2020

Friday 31st of July 2020 09:55:07 PM

Here is my monthly update covering what I have been doing in the free and open source software world during July 2020 (previous month):

  • Opened a pull request to make the build reproducible in PyERFA, a set of Python bindings for various astronomy-related utilities (#45), as well as one for PeachPy assembler to make the output of codecode/x86_64.py reproducible (#108).

SPI is a non-profit corporation that acts as a fiscal sponsor for organisations that develop open source software and hardware.
  • As part of being on the board of directors of the Open Source Initiative and Software in the Public Interest I attended their respective monthly meetings and participated in various licensing and other discussions occurring on the internet, as well as the usual internal discussions regarding logistics and policy etc. This month, it was SPI's Annual General Meeting and the OSI has been running a number of remote strategy sessions for the board.

  • Fixed an issue in my tickle-me-email library that implements Getting Things Done (GTD)-like behaviours in IMAP inboxes to ensure that all messages have a unique Message-Id header. [...]

  • Reviewed and merged even more changes by Pavel Dolecek into my Strava Enhancement Suite, a Chrome extension to improve the user experience on the Strava athletic tracker.

  • Updated travis.debian.net, my hosted service for projects that host their Debian packaging on GitHub, to use the Travis CI continuous integration platform) to fix a compatibility issue with the latest version of mk-build-deps. [...][...]


Lintian analyses Debian packages and reports bugs and policy violations. It contains automated checks for many aspects of Debian policy as well as checks for common errors.

For Lintian, the static analysis tool for Debian packages:

  • Update the regular expression to search for all the released versions in a .changes file. [...]

  • Avoid false-positives when matching sensible-utils utilities such as i3-sensible-pager. (#966022)

  • Rename the send-patch tag to patch-not-forwarded-upstream. [...]

  • Drop reminders from 26 tags that false-positives should be reported to Lintian as this is implicit in all our tags. [...]


§


Reproducible Builds

One of the original promises of open source software is that distributed peer review and transparency of process results in enhanced end-user security. However, whilst anyone may inspect the source code of free and open source software for malicious flaws, almost all software today is distributed as pre-compiled binaries. This allows nefarious third-parties to compromise systems by injecting malicious code into ostensibly secure software during the various compilation and distribution processes.

The motivation behind the Reproducible Builds effort is to ensure no flaws have been introduced during this compilation process by promising identical results are always generated from a given source, thus allowing multiple third-parties to come to a consensus on whether a build was compromised.


Conservancy is not-for-profit 501(c)(3) charity focused on ethical technology and user freedom.

The project is proud to be a member project of the Software Freedom Conservancy. Conservancy acts as a corporate umbrella allowing projects to operate as non-profit initiatives without managing their own corporate structure. If you like the work of the Conservancy or the Reproducible Builds project, please consider becoming an official supporter.

This month, I:



§


diffoscope
diffoscope is our in-depth and content-aware diff utility that can locate and diagnose reproducibility issues.

Elsewhere in our tooling, I made the following changes to diffoscope, including preparing and uploading versions 150, 151, 152, 153 & 154 to Debian:

  • New features:

    • Add support for flash-optimised F2FS filesystems. (#207)
    • Don't require zipnote(1) to determine differences in a .zip file as we can use libarchive. [...]
    • Allow --profile as a synonym for --profile=-, ie. write profiling data to standard output. [...]
    • Increase the minimum length of the output of strings(1) to eight characters to avoid unnecessary diff noise. [...]
    • Drop some legacy argument styles: --exclude-directory-metadata and --no-exclude-directory-metadata have been replaced with --exclude-directory-metadata={yes,no}. [...]
  • Bug fixes:

    • Pass the absolute path when extracting members from SquashFS images as we run the command with working directory in a temporary directory. (#189)
    • Correct adding a comment when we cannot extract a filesystem due to missing libguestfs module. [...]
    • Don't crash when listing entries in archives if they don't have a listed size such as hardlinks in ISO images. (#188)
  • Output improvements:

    • Strip off the file offset prefix from xxd(1) and show bytes in groups of 4. [...]
    • Don't emit javap not found in path if it is available in the path but it did not result in an actual difference. [...]
    • Fix ... not available in path messages when looking for Java decompilers that used the Python class name instead of the command. [...]
  • Logging improvements:

    • Add a bit more debugging info when launching libguestfs. [...]
    • Reduce the --debug log noise by truncating the has_some_content messages. [...]
    • Fix the compare_files log message when the file does not have a literal name. [...]
  • Codebase improvements:

    • Rewrite and rename exit_if_paths_do_not_exist to not check files multiple times. [...][...]
    • Add an add_comment helper method; don't mess with our internal list directly. [...]
    • Replace some simple usages of str.format with Python 'f-strings' [...] and make it easier to navigate to the main.py entry point [...].
    • In the RData comparator, always explicitly return None in the failure case as we return a non-None value in the success one. [...]
    • Tidy some imports [...][...][...] and don't alias a variable when we don't end up using. [...]
    • Clarify the use of a separate NullChanges quasi-file to represent missing data in the Debian package comparator [...] and clarify use of a 'null' diff in order to remember an exit code. [...]
  • Misc:


§



Debian

In Debian, I made the following uploads this month:


§


Debian LTS

This month I have worked 18 hours on Debian Long Term Support (LTS) and 12 for the Extended LTS project. This included:

You can find out more about the project via the following video:

Jonathan Carter: Free Software Activities for 2020-07

Friday 31st of July 2020 05:01:03 PM

Here are my uploads for the month of July, which is just a part of my free software activities, I’ll try to catch up on the rest in upcoming posts. I haven’t indulged in online conferences much over the last few months, but this month I attended the virtual editions of Guadec 2020 and HOPE 2020. HOPE isn’t something I knew about before and I enjoyed it a lot, you can find their videos on archive.org.

Debian Uploads

2020-07-05: Sponsor backport gamemode-1.5.1-5 for Debian buster-backports.

2020-07-06: Sponsor package piper (0.5.1-1) for Debian unstable (mentors.debian.net request).

2020-07-14: Upload package speedtest-cli (2.0.2-1+deb10u1) to Debian buster (Closes: #940165, #965116).

2020-07-15: Upload package calamares (3.2.27-1) to Debian unstable.

2020-07-15: Merge MR#1 for gnome-shell-extension-dash-to-panel.

2020-07-15: Upload package gnome-shell-extension-dash-to-panel (38-1) to Debian unstable.

2020-07-15: Upload package gnome-shell-extension-disconnect-wifi (25-1) to Debian unstable.

2020-07-15: Upload package gnome-shell-extension-draw-on-your-screen (6.1-1) to Debian unstable.

2020-07-15: Upload package xabacus (8.2.8-1) to Debian unstable.

2020-07-15: Upload package s-tui (1.0.2-1) to Debian unstable.

2020-07-15: Upload package calamares-settings-debian (10.0.2-1+deb10u2) to Debian buster (Closes: #934503, #934504).

2020-07-15: Upload package calamares-settings-debian (10.0.2-1+deb10u3) to Debian buster (Closes: #959541, #965117).

2020-07-15: Upload package calamares-settings-debian (11.0.2-1) to Debian unstable.

2020-07-19: Upload package bluefish (2.2.11+svn-r8872-1) to Debian unstable (Closes: #593413, #593427, #692284, #730543, #857330, #892502, #951143).

2020-07-19: Upload package bundlewrap (4.0.0-1) to Debian unstable.

2020-07-20: Upload package bluefish (2.2.11+svn-r8872-1) to Debian unstable (Closes: #965332).

2020-07-22: Upload package calamares (3.2.27-1~bpo10+1) to Debian buster-backports.

2020-07-24: Upload package bluefish (2.2.11_svn-r8872-3) to Debian unstable (Closes: #965944).

François Marier: Extending GPG key expiry

Friday 31st of July 2020 03:45:00 AM

Extending the expiry on a GPG key is not very hard, but it's easy to forget a step. Here's how I did my last expiry bump.

Update the expiry on the main key and the subkey:

gpg --edit-key KEYID > expire > key 1 > expire > save

Upload the updated key to the keyservers:

gpg --export KEYID | curl -T - https://keys.openpgp.org gpg --keyserver keyring.debian.org --send-keys KEYID

Reproducible Builds (diffoscope): diffoscope 154 released

Friday 31st of July 2020 12:00:00 AM

The diffoscope maintainers are pleased to announce the release of diffoscope version 154. This version includes the following changes:

[ Chris Lamb ] * Add support for F2FS filesystems. (Closes: reproducible-builds/diffoscope#207) * Allow "--profile" as a synonym for "--profile=-". * Add an add_comment helper method so don't mess with our _comments list directly. * Add missing bullet point in a previous changelog entry. * Use "human-readable" over unhyphenated version. * Add a bit more debugging around launching guestfs. * Profile the launch of guestfs filesystems. * Correct adding a comment when we cannot extract a filesystem due to missing guestfs module.

You find out more by visiting the project homepage.

Russell Coker: Links July 2020

Thursday 30th of July 2020 11:59:23 PM

iMore has an insightful article about Apple’s transition to the ARM instruction set for new Mac desktops and laptops [1]. I’d still like to see them do something for the server side.

Umair Haque wrote an insightful article about How the American Idiot Made America Unlivable [2]. We are witnessing the destruction of a once great nation.

Chris Lamb wrote an interesting blog post about comedy shows with the laugh tracks edited out [3]. He then compares that to social media with the like count hidden which is an interesting perspective. I’m not going to watch TV shows edited in that way (I’ve enjoyed BBT inspite of all the bad things about it) and I’m not going to try and hide like counts on social media. But it’s interesting to consider these things.

Cory Doctorow wrote an interesting Locus article suggesting that we could have full employment by a transition to renewable energy and methods for cleaning up the climate problems we are too late to prevent [4]. That seems plausible, but I think we should still get a Universal Basic Income.

The Thinking Shop has posters and decks of cards with logical fallacies and cognitive biases [5]. Every company should put some of these in meeting rooms. Also they have free PDFs to download and print your own posters.

gayhomophobe.com [6] is a site that lists powerful homophobic people who hurt GLBT people but then turned out to be gay. It’s presented in an amusing manner, people who hurt others deserve to be mocked.

Wired has an insightful article about the shutdown of Backpage [7]. The owners of Backpage weren’t nice people and they did some stupid things which seem bad (like editing posts to remove terms like “lolita”). But they also worked well with police to find criminals. The opposition to what Backpage were doing conflates sex trafficing, child prostitution, and legal consenting adult sex work. Taking down Backpage seems to be a bad thing for the victims of sex trafficing, for consenting adult sex workers, and for society in general.

Cloudflare has an interesting blog post about short lived certificates for ssh access [8]. Instead of having user’s ssh keys stored on servers each user has to connect to a SSO server to obtain a temporary key before connecting, so revoking an account is easy.

Related posts:

  1. Links January 2020 C is Not a Low Level Language [1] is an...
  2. Links March 2020 Rolling Stone has an insightful article about why the Christian...
  3. Links June 2020 Bruce Schneier wrote an informative post about Zoom security problems...

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    Python 3.9.0 is almost ready. This release, 3.9.0rc1, is the penultimate release preview. You can get it here: https://www.python.org/downloads/release/python-390rc1/ Entering the release candidate phase, only reviewed code changes which are clear bug fixes are allowed between this release candidate and the final release. The second candidate and the last planned release preview is currently planned for 2020-09-14. Please keep in mind that this is a preview release and its use is not recommended for production environments.

  • The Inner Workings of: Arq

    The main point of (what I colloquially call) a job library is, essentially, to execute a function (i.e. job) somewhere else, and potentially at a different time. When using a sync approach to web services (such as when using non-async Django or Flask), the limitations of the synchronous IO model basically require the use of a job library to execute logic outside of the context of a single request handler - if you don't want to do the logic in the scope of a request (and make the request take longer), you need to do it somewhere else, so you need a job library like Celery. A simple example might be an HTTP interface to send an email to a lot of recipients. You might not want the request to wait until all the emails have been sent to return a response since that might take a long time, so you would just schedule a job to run somewhere else to do the work. Job libraries like Celery basically require you to run special worker processes in addition to your web handler processes, and the worker processes use a database to get instructions to run functions, and then they run them.

  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Weekly Check-In | GSoc | #11
  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #433 (Aug. 11, 2020)
  • Pysa: An Open-Source Tool To Detect & Fix Security Issues In Python Code

    Facebook has open-sourced Pysa, an internal tool used on Instagram to detect and fix bugs in the huge Python codebase of the app. Pysa can automatically identify vulnerable code snippets written by Facebook engineers before they are integrated into the social network’s systems. It is a static analyzer tool meaning it works by scanning code in a “static” form before the code is compiled. It hunts for common patterns that are usually observed in bugs and flags the potential issues in the code.

  • Facebook Open Sources Analysis Tool for Python Code

    The security-focused tool relies on Pyre, Facebook’s type checker for Python, and allows for the analysis of how data flows through code. It can be used to identify issues related to the protection of user data, as well as flaws such as XSS and SQL injection.

    In addition to making Pysa available in open source, Facebook released many of the definitions that it leverages when looking for security bugs, making it readily available for others to start analyzing their own Python code.

Go 1.15 Release Notes

The latest Go release, version 1.15, arrives six months after Go 1.14. Most of its changes are in the implementation of the toolchain, runtime, and libraries. As always, the release maintains the Go 1 promise of compatibility. We expect almost all Go programs to continue to compile and run as before. Read more Also: Go 1.15 Released With Much Improved Linker, New CPU Mitigations

Intel and Linux: Mesa, mOS, SERIALIZE and IWD

  • Intel Iris Gallium3D Driver Adds Compute Kernel Support In Mesa 20.3

    While Mesa 20.2 isn't even releasing for a few weeks, Mesa 20.3 is already seeing new feature work that will debut next quarter.  Intel's Jason Ekstrand has landed a set of patches for handling of kernels within Iris, Intel's modern Gallium3D driver. He commented, "This MR contains most of the patches required to handle kernels in iris. I've had them lying around in a branch in some form or another for a while. We should upstream what we can." 

  • Intel Making Progress On Their "mOS" Modified Linux Kernel Running Lightweight Kernels

    For a while now Intel has been quietly been working on "mOS" as the "multi-OS" that is a modified version of the Linux kernel that in turn is running lightweight kernels for high-performance computing purposes.

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  • POWER10 Virtualization, Intel SERIALIZE Come For KVM On Linux 5.9

    Sent in last week for the Linux 5.9 kernel merge window were the initial batch of changes to the Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) while today some additional interesting changes were sent out.  This latest material for KVM in Linux 5.9 includes:  - Support for the SERIALIZE instruction on KVM x86/x86_64. Intel's SERIALIZE ensures all flags/register/memory modifications are complete and all buffered writes drained before moving on to execute the next instruction. This can be used for stopping speculative execution and prefetching of modified kernel. The first CPUs expected with SERIALIZE are Sapphire Rapids and Alder Lake next year while Linux has already begun preparing for SERIALIZE where relevant. 

  • Ubuntu Is Looking At Offering Better WiFi Support By Using Intel's IWD

    Ubuntu developers are looking at using Intel IWD as the iNET wireless daemon to potentially replace WPA_Supplicant for offering a better WiFi experience. Intel's open-source team has always been working on IWD as a potential replacement to WPA_Supplicant while recently the Ubuntu folks have found it has "mostly reached feature parity" now to WPA_Supplicant albeit is in need of more testing on the desktop side.

Games: Terminal Phase, Imperator: Rome and More

  • Terminal Phase in Linux Magazine (Polish edition)

    Hey look at that! My terminal-space-shooter-game Terminal Phase made an appearance in the Polish version of Linux Magazine. I had no idea, but Michal Majchrzak both tipped me off to it and took the pictures. (Thank you!) I don't know Polish but I can see some references to Konami and SHMUP (shoot-em-up game). The screenshot they have isn't the one I published, so I guess the author got it running too... I hope they had fun!

  • Imperator: Rome gets a major free update, new DLC and cross-store multiplayer

    Paradox Interactive and Paradox Development Studio put out a massive upgrade for Imperator: Rome which includes a free update, an expansion and cross-platform / cross-store online play. There's quite a lot to dissect here, so let's start with the free content update. The 1.5 "Menander" update went out, as part of their focus on smaller and more regular updates to various systems. With the main point being to add greater depth to cultural management in the game.

  • Prepare your hard drive as another Steam Game Festival is coming in October

    After a massive success with the most recent Steam Game Festival back in June, it's going to return for another round later this year in October. This is where Steam users get to play through a ton of limited-time demos, which originally started back in December 2019 to go along with The Game Awards. From a post on the Steamworks Development group on Steam, the date is confirmed to be October 7 - 13. Valve mentioned in the announcement that they will soon open up the developer opt-in for the event, giving developers another chance to get a demo out there and get more eyes on their game. Developers don't have long, as the opt-in date is only open from between August 19 - 26.