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Arturo Borrero González: Wikimania 2019 Stockholm summary

Wednesday 28th of August 2019 12:00:00 PM

A couple of weeks ago I attended the Wikimania 2019 conference in Stockholm, Sweden. This is the general and global conference for the Wikimedia movement, in which people interested in free knowledge gather together for a few days. The event happens annually, and this was my first time attending such conference. Wikimania 2019 main program ran for 3 days, but we had 2 pre-conference days in which a hackathon was held.

The venue was an amazing building in the Stockholm University, Aula Magna.

The hackathon reunited technical contributors, such as developers, which are interested in a variety of technical challenges in the wiki movement. You can find in the hackathon people interested in wiki edits automation, research, anti harassment tools and also infrastructure engineering and architecture, among other things.

My full time job is at the Wikimedia Cloud Services team. We provide platforms and services for wikimedia movement collaborators who want to perform technical tasks and contributions. Some examples of what we provide:

  • a public cloud service based on Openstack, AKA IaaS. We call this CloudVPS.
  • a PaaS product, based on Kubernetes and GridEngine. We call this Toolforge.
  • direct access to wiki databases in both SQL and XML format.
  • several other software products, like Quarry, PAWS, etc.

These services are widely used in the wiki community. About 40% of total edits to wiki projects come from software running in our platform. Some coworkers and myself attended the hackathon to provide support related to these tools and services, and to introduce them to new contributors.

We had session/talk called Introduction to Wikimedia Cloud Services the first day of the hackathon, and folks showed genuine interests in the things we offer. Some stuff I did during the hackathon included creating lots of Toolforge accounts, fixing issues in Cloud VPS projects, talks with many people about related technical topics, etc.

Once the hackathon ended, the main program conference started. I was amazed to see how vibrant the wiki movement is. Seeing people from all over the world sharing such a great mission and goals was really inspiring and I truly felt grateful for being part of it. The conference is joined by many wiki enthusiasts, editors and other volunteers from many organizations and local wiki chapters. For the record, the amount of paid staff from the Wikimedia Foundation is limited.

Honestly, until I attended this conference I was not aware of the scope and size of the movement and the variety of topics and approaches that involve free knowledge, the ultimate goal, which is not a far-fetched mission: we are in good track despite the many challenges :-)

After the conference, we had another week in Stockholm for a Tehcnical Engagement team offsite.

Daniel Silverstone: RFH: Naming things is hard

Wednesday 28th of August 2019 08:13:52 AM

As with all things in computing, one of two problems always seem to raise their ugly heads… We either have an off-by-one error, or we have a caching error, or we have a naming problem.

Lars and I have been working on an acceptance testing tool recently. You may have seen the soft launch announcement on Lars' blog. Sadly since that time we've discovered that Fable is an overloaded name in the domain of software quality assurance and we do not want to try and compete with Fable since (a) they were there first, and (b) accessibility is super-important and we don't want to detract from the work they're doing.

As such, this is a request for help. We need to name our tool usefully, since how can we make a git repository until we have a name? Previous incarnations of the tool were called Yarn and we chose Fable to carry on the sense of telling a story (the fundamental unit of testing in these systems is a scenario), but we are not wedded to the idea of continuing in the same vein.

If you have an idea for a name for our tool, please consider reading about it on the Fable website, and then either comment here, or send me an email, prod me on IRC, or indeed any of the various ways you have to find me.

Mike Gabriel: Release of nx-libs 3.5.99.22 (Call for Testing: Keyboard auto-grab Support)

Tuesday 27th of August 2019 08:54:42 PM

Long time not blogged about, however, there is a new release of nx-libs: nx-libs 3.5.99.22.

What is nx-libs?

The nx-libs team maintains a software originally developed by NoMachine under the name nx-X11 (version 3) or shorter: NXv3. For years now, a small team of volunteers is continually improving, fixing and maintaining the code base (after some major and radical cleanups) of NXv3. NXv3 aka x2goagent has been the only graphical backend in X2Go [0], a remote desktop framework for Linux terminal servers, over the past years.

(Spoiler: in the near future, there will be two graphical backends for X2Go sessions, if you got curious... stay tuned...).

Credits

You may have noticed, that I skipped announcing several releases of nx-libs. All interim releases should have had their own announcements, indeed, as each of them deserved it. So I am sorry and I dearly apologize for not mentioning all the details of each individual release. I am sorry for not giving credits to the team of developers around me who do pretty hard work on keeping this beast intact.

The more, let me here here and now especially give credits to Ulrich Sibiller, Mihai Moldovan and Mario Trangoni for keeping the torch burning and for actually having achieved awesome results in each of the recent nx-libs releases over the past year or so. Thanks, folks!!!

Luckily, Mihai Moldovan (X2Go Release Manager) wrote regular release announcements for every version of nx-libs that he pulled over to the X2Go Git site and the X2Go upstream-DEBs archive site [1]. Also a big thanks for this!

Changes for nx-libs 3.5.99.21 and 3.5.99.22 3.5.99.21
  • Ulrich Sibiller did a major memory leak, double-free, etc. hunt all over the code and fixed several of such issues. Most of them will be in nx-libs shipped with Debian 10.1. (The one that is not yet in there has only recently been discovered).
  • There was also work done on the reparenting code when switching between fullscreen and windowed desktop session mode.
  • Ulrich Sibiller also reworked the NX-specific part of the XKB integration and cleaned up Font path handling.

For a complete list of changes, see the 3.5.99.21 upstream release commit [2].

3.5.99.22
  • The nxagent DDX code now uses the SAFE_Xfree and SAFE_free macros recently introduced everywhere.
  • The NX splash screen code had been tidied up entirely, plus: with nxagent option "-wr" you can now create a root window with white background.
  • Keyboard Auto-Grab support (see below)
  • Fix a double-free situation in the RandR implementation that occurred on NX session resumption

For a complete list of changes, see the 3.5.99.22 upstream release commit [3].

The new Feature: Keyboard auto-grab Support ( call for testing )

There is a new feature in nx-libs (aka nxagent, aka x2goagent) that people may find interesting. Ulrich Sibiller and I have been working on and off on a keyboard auto-grab feature for NX. See various discussions on nx-libs's issue tracker [4, 5, 6].

With keyboard auto-grab enabled (toggle switch is CTRL+ALT+G, configurable via /etc/{nxagent,x2goagent}/keystrokes.cfg), you can now run e.g. an "i3" [7] (or "awesome" [8]) window manager nested inside X2Go sessions with the local desktop environment also being an "i3" (or "awesome") window manager. I hear some of you cheering up now, in fact. Yes, it has become possible, finally.

Before we had this keyboard auto-grab feature in NX, it was not possible to connect to an X2Go session running i3 desktop from within an i3 window manager running on the local $DISPLAY. Keyboard input would never really end up in the X2Go session.

With keyboard auto-grab enabled, you can now nest "i3" (or "awesome") based desktops (local + remote via X2Go). If keyboard auto-grab is enabled, nearly all keyboard events (except the NX keystrokes) end up in the X2Go session window. With auto-grab disabled, all keyboard events end up in the local $DISPLAY's i3 (or "awesome") desktop.

Here is a little command line LOVE, to play with:

Log into a local desktop session, running the i3 window manager (if you have never touch i3, use awesome). If you don't know what tiling window managers are and how to use them... Try them out first.

If you are in a local i3wm session, do this from one terminal:

sudo apt-get install nxagent nxagent -ac :1

And from another terminal:

export DISPLAY=:1 STARTUP=i3 dbus-run-session /etc/X11/Xsession

(You could do this more than once... You can use STARTUP=awesome instead of STARTUP=i3, too. ).

Have fun with nested tiling desktop environments tiled all over your screen. Use CTRL-ALT-G to toggle keyboard auto-grabbing for each NX session window individually. By default, auto-grab is disabled on startup of nxagent, so the local i3wm gets all the keyboard attention. Move the mouse over an nxagent + i3 window / tile and hit CTRL-ALT-G. Now the NX session window has all keyboard attention as long as the mouse pointer hovers above it.

And: please report any special and unexpected effects to the nx-libs issue tracker [9]. Thanks!

Have fun!!! Mike Gabriel (aka sunweaver)

References

Mark Brown: Linux Audio Miniconference 2019

Tuesday 27th of August 2019 08:28:49 PM

As in previous years we’re going to have an audio miniconference so we can get together and talk through issues, especially design decisions, face to face. This year’s event will be held on Sunday October 31st in Lyon, France, the day after ELC-E. This will be held at the Lyon Convention Center (the ELC-E venue), generously sponsored by Intel.

As with previous years let’s pull together an agenda through a mailing list discussion – this announcement has been posted to alsa-devel as well, the most convenient thing would be to follow up to it. Of course if we can sort things out more quickly via the mailing list that’s even better!

If you’re planning to attend please fill out the form here.

This event will be covered by the same code of conduct as ELC-E.

Thanks again to Intel for supporting this event.

Holger Levsen: 20190827-cccamp

Tuesday 27th of August 2019 03:05:26 PM
On my way home from CCCamp 2019

During the last week I've been swimming many times in 4 different lakes, enjoyed a great variety of talks, music, food, drinks and lots of nerdstuff. The small forest I put my tent in was illuminated through a disco ball. And almost best of it all, until an hour ago, I spent the last 72h offline with friends.

I <3 cccamp.

Mike Gabriel: Debian goes libjpeg-turbo 2.0.x [RFH]

Tuesday 27th of August 2019 02:10:05 PM

I recently uploaded libjpeg-turbo 2.0.2-1~exp1 to Debian experimental. This has been the first upload of the 2.0.x release series of libjpeg-turbo.

After 3 further upload iterations (~exp4 that is), the package now builds on nearly all (except 3) architectures supported by Debian.

@all: Please Test

For those architectures that libjpeg-turbo 2.0.2-1~exp* is already available in Debian experimental, please start testing your applications on Debian testing/unstable systems with libjpeg-turbo 2.0.2-1~exp* installed from experimental. If you observe any peculiarities, please file bugs against src:libjpeg-turbo on Debian BTS. Thanks!

Please note: the major 2.x release series does not introduce an SOVERSION bump, so applications don't have to be rebuilt against the newer libjpeg-turbo. Simply drop-in-replace installed libjpeg62-turbo bin:pkg by the version from Debian experimental.

[RFH] FTBFS during Unit Tests

On the alphas, powerpc and sparc64 architectures, the builds [1] fail during unit tests:

301/302 Test #155: tjunittest-static-yuv-alloc ....................... Passed 60.08 sec 302/302 Test #156: tjunittest-static-yuv-nopad ....................... Passed 60.01 sec 99% tests passed, 2 tests failed out of 302 Total Test time (real) = 121.40 sec The following tests FAILED: 83 - djpeg-shared-3x2-float-prog-cmp (Failed) 234 - djpeg-static-3x2-float-prog-cmp (Failed) Errors while running CTest make[1]: *** [Makefile:133: test] Error 8 make[1]: Leaving directory '/<<PKGBUILDDIR>>/obj-sparc64-linux-gnu' dh_auto_test: cd obj-sparc64-linux-gnu && make -j8 test ARGS\+=-j8 returned exit code 2 make: *** [debian/rules:40: build-arch] Error 255

As I am not so much a porter, nor a JPEG adept, I'll appreciate some help from people with more porting and/or JPEG experience. If you feel called to work on this, please ping me on IRC (OFTC) so we can coordinate our research. The packaging Git of libjpeg-turbo has recently been migrated to Salsa [2].

References

Thanks in advance to anyone who chimes in,
Mike (aka sunweaver)

Jonathan Dowland: Debian hiatus

Tuesday 27th of August 2019 01:20:24 PM

Back In July I decided to take a (minimum) six months hiatus from involvement in the Debian project. This is for a number of reasons, but I completely forgot to write about it publically. So here we are.

I'm going to look at things again no sooner than January 2020 and decide whether or not (or how much) to pick it back up.

Colin Watson: man-db 2.8.7

Tuesday 27th of August 2019 05:55:25 AM

I’ve released man-db 2.8.7 (announcement, NEWS), and uploaded it to Debian unstable.

There are a few things of note that I wanted to talk about here. Firstly, I made some further improvements to the seccomp sandbox originally introduced in 2.8.0. I do still think it’s correct to try to confine subprocesses this way as a defence against malicious documents, but it’s also been a pretty rough ride for some users, especially those who use various kinds of VPNs or antivirus programs that install themselves using /etc/ld.so.preload and cause other programs to perform additional system calls. As well as a few specific tweaks, a recent discussion on LWN reminded me that it would be better to make seccomp return EPERM rather than raising SIGSYS, since that’s easier to handle gracefully: in particular, it fixes an odd corner case related to glibc’s nscd handling.

Secondly, there was a build failure on macOS that took a while to figure out, not least because I don’t have a macOS test system myself. In 2.8.6 I tried to make life easier for people on this platform with a CFLAGS tweak, but I made it a bit too general and accidentally took away configure’s ability to detect undefined symbols properly, which caused very confusing failures. More importantly, I hadn’t really thought through why this change was necessary and whether it was a good idea. man-db uses private shared libraries to keep its executable size down, and it passes -no-undefined to libtool to declare that those shared libraries have no undefined symbols after linking, which is necessary to build shared libraries on some platforms. But the CFLAGS tweak above directly contradicts this! So, instead of playing core wars with my own build system, I did some refactoring so that the assertion that man-db’s shared libraries have no undefined symbols after linking is actually true: this involved moving decompression code out of libman, and arranging for the code in libmandb to take the database path as a parameter rather than as a global variable (something I’ve meant to fix for ages anyway; 252d7cbc23, 036aa910ea, a97d977b0b). Lesson: don’t make build system changes you don’t quite understand.

Russ Allbery: Review: Space Opera

Tuesday 27th of August 2019 01:39:00 AM

Review: Space Opera, by Catherynne M. Valente

Publisher: Saga Copyright: 2018 ISBN: 1-4814-9751-0 Format: Kindle Pages: 304

Life is not, as humans had come to think, rare. The universe is packed with it, bursting at the seams. The answer to the Fermi paradox is not that life on Earth is a flukish chance. It's that, until recently, everyone else was distracted by total galactic war.

Thankfully by the time the other intelligent inhabitants of the galaxy stumble across Earth the Sentience Wars are over. They have found a workable solution to the everlasting problem of who counts as people and who counts as meat, who is sufficiently sentient and self-aware to be allowed to join the galactic community and who needs to be quietly annihilated and never spoken of again. That solution is the Metagalactic Grand Prix, a musical extravaganza that is also the highest-rated entertainment in the galaxy. All the newly-discovered species has to do is not finish dead last.

An overwhelmingly adorable giant space flamingo appears simultaneously to every person on Earth to explain this, and also to reassure everyone that they don't need to agonize over which musical act to send to save their species. As their sponsors and the last new species to survive the Grand Prix, the Esca have made a list of Earth bands they think would be suitable. Sadly though, due to some misunderstandings about the tragically short lifespans of humans, every entry on the list is dead but one: Decibel Jones and the Absolute Zeroes. Or their surviving two members, at least.

Space Opera is unapologetically and explicitly The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy meets Eurovision. Decibel Jones and his bandmate Oort are the Arthur Dent of this story, whisked away in an impossible spaceship to an alien music festival where they're expected to sing for the survival of their planet, minus one band member and well past their prime. When they were at the height of their career, they were the sort of sequin-covered glam rock act that would fit right in to a Eurovision contest. Decibel Jones still wants to be that person; Oort, on the other hand, has a wife and kids and has cashed in the glitterpunk life for stability. Neither of them have any idea what to sing, assuming they even survive to the final round; sabotage is allowed in the rules (it's great for ratings).

I love the idea of Eurovision, one that it shares with the Olympics but delivers with less seriousness and therefore possibly more effectiveness. One way to avoid war is to build shared cultural ties through friendly competition, to laugh with each other and applaud each other, and to make a glorious show out of it. It's a great hook for a book. But this book has serious problems.

The first is that emulating The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy rarely ends well. Many people have tried, and I don't know of anyone who has succeeded. It sits near the top of many people's lists of the best humorous SF not because it's a foundational model for other people's work, but because Douglas Adams had a singular voice that is almost impossible to reproduce.

To be fair, Valente doesn't try that hard. She goes a different direction: she tries to stuff into the text of the book the written equivalent of the over-the-top, glitter-covered, hilariously excessive stage shows of unapologetic pop rock spectacle. The result... well, it's like an overstuffed couch upholstered in fuchsia and spangles, onto which have plopped the four members of a vaguely-remembered boy band attired in the most eye-wrenching shade of violet satin and sulking petulantly because you have failed to provide usable cans of silly string due to the unfortunate antics of your pet cat, Eunice (it's a long story involving an ex and a book collection), in an ocean-reef aquarium that was a birthday gift from your sister, thus provoking a frustrated glare across an Escher knot of brilliant yellow and now-empty hollow-sounding cans of propellant, when Joe, the cute blonde one who was always your favorite, asks you why your couch and its impossibly green rug is sitting in the middle of Grand Central Station, and you have to admit that you do not remember because the beginning of the sentence slipped into a simile singularity so long ago.

Valente always loves her descriptions and metaphors, but in Space Opera she takes this to a new level, one covered in garish, cheap plastic. Also, if you can get through the Esca's explanation of what's going on without wanting to strangle their entire civilization, you have a higher tolerance for weaponized cutesy condescension than I do.

That leads me back to Hitchhiker's Guide and the difficulties of humor based on bizarre aliens and ludicrous technology: it's not funny or effective unless someone is taking it seriously.

Valente includes, in an early chapter, the rules of the Metagalactic Grand Prix. Here's the first one:

The Grand Prix shall occur once per Standard Alumizar Year, which is hereby defined by how long it takes Aluno Secundus to drag its business around its morbidly obese star, get tired, have a nap, wake up cranky, yell at everyone for existing, turn around, go back around the other way, get lost, start crying, feel sorry for itself and give up on the whole business, and finally try to finish the rest of its orbit all in one go the night before it's due, which is to say, far longer than a year by almost anyone else's annoyed wristwatch.

This is, in isolation, perhaps moderately amusing, but it's the formal text of the rules of the foundational event of galactic politics. Eurovision does not take itself that seriously, but it does have rules, which you can read, and they don't sound like that, because this isn't how bureaucracies work. Even bureaucracies that put on ridiculous stage shows. This shouldn't have been the actual rules. It should have been the Hitchhiker's Guide entry for the rules, but this book doesn't seem to know the difference.

One of the things that makes Hitchhiker's Guide work is that much of what happens is impossible for Arthur Dent or the reader to take seriously, but to everyone else in the book it's just normal. The humor lies in the contrast.

In Space Opera, no one takes anything seriously, even when they should. The rules are a joke, the Esca think the whole thing is a lark, the representatives of galactic powers are annoying contestants on a cut-rate reality show, and the relentless drumbeat of more outrageous descriptions never stops. Even the angst is covered in glitter. Without that contrast, without the pause for Arthur to suddenly realize what it means for the planet to be destroyed, without Ford Prefect dryly explaining things in a way that almost makes sense, the attempted humor just piles on itself until it collapses under its own confusing weight. Valente has no characters capable of creating enough emotional space to breathe. Decibel Jones only does introspection by moping, Oort is single-note grumbling, and each alien species is more wildly fantastic than the last.

This book works best when Valente puts the plot aside and tells the stories of the previous Grands Prix. By that point in the book, I was somewhat acclimated to the over-enthusiastic descriptions and was able to read past them to appreciate some entertainingly creative alien designs. Those sections of the book felt like a group of friends read a dozen books on designing alien species, dropped acid, and then tried to write a Traveler supplement. A book with those sections and some better characters and less strained writing could have been a lot of fun.

Unfortunately, there is a plot, if a paper-thin one, and it involves tedious and unlikable characters. There were three people I truly liked in this book: Decibel's Nani (I'm going to remember Mr. Elmer of the Fudd) who appears only in quotes, Oort's cat, and Mira. Valente, beneath the overblown writing, does some lovely characterization of the band as a trio, but Mira is the anchor and the only character of the three who is interesting in her own right. If this book had been about her... well, there are still a lot of problems, but I would have enjoyed it more. Sadly, she appears mostly around the edges of other people's manic despair.

That brings me to a final complaint. The core of this book is musical performance, which means that Valente has set herself the challenging task of describing music and performance sufficiently well to give the reader some vague hint of what's good, what isn't, and why. This does not work even a little bit. Most of the alien music is described in terms of hyperspecific genres that the characters are assumed to have heard of and haven't, which was a nice bit of parody of musical writing but which doesn't do much to create a mental soundtrack. The rest is nonspecific superlatives. Even when a performance is successful, I had no idea why, or what would make the audience like one performance and not another. This would have been the one useful purpose of all that overwrought description.

Clearly some people liked this book well enough to nominate it for awards. Humor is unpredictable; I'm sure there are readers who thought Space Opera was hilarious. But I wanted to salvage about 10% of this book, three of the supporting characters, and a couple of the alien ideas, and transport them into a better book far away from the tedious deluge of words.

I am now inspired to re-read The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, though, so there is that.

Rating: 3 out of 10

Alberto García: The status of WebKitGTK in Debian

Monday 26th of August 2019 01:13:10 PM

Like all other major browser engines, WebKit is a project that evolves very fast with releases every few weeks containing new features and security fixes.

WebKitGTK is available in Debian under the webkit2gtk name, and we are doing our best to provide the most up-to-date packages for as many users as possible.

I would like to give a quick summary of the status of WebKitGTK in Debian: what you can expect and where you can find the packages.

  • Debian unstable (sid): The most recent stable version of WebKitGTK (2.24.3 at the time of writing) is always available in Debian unstable, typically on the same day of the upstream release.
  • Debian testing (bullseye): If no new bugs are found, that same version will be available in Debian testing a few days later.
  • Debian stable (buster): WebKitGTK is covered by security support for the first time in Debian buster, so stable releases that contain security fixes will be made available through debian-security. The upstream dependencies policy guarantees that this will be possible during the buster lifetime. Apart from security updates, users of Debian buster will get newer packages during point releases.
  • Debian experimental: The most recent development version of WebKitGTK (2.25.4 at the time of writing) is always available in Debian experimental.

In addition to that, the most recent stable versions are also available as backports.

  • Debian stable (buster): Users can get the most recent stable releases of WebKitGTK from buster-backports, usually a couple of days after they are available in Debian testing.
  • Debian oldstable (stretch): While possible we are also providing backports for stretch using stretch-backports-sloppy. Due to older or missing dependencies some features may be disabled when compared to the packages in buster or testing.

You can also find a table with an overview of all available packages here.

One last thing: as explained on the release notes, users of i386 CPUs without SSE2 support will have problems with the packages available in Debian buster (webkit2gtk 2.24.2-1). This problem has already been corrected in the packages available in buster-backports or in the upcoming point release.

Utkarsh Gupta: Farewell, GSoC o/

Monday 26th of August 2019 12:03:15 AM

Hello, there.

In open source, we feel strongly that to really do something well, you have to get a lot of people involved.

Guess Linus Torvalds got that right from the start.
While GSoC 2019 comes to end, this project hasn’t. With GSoC, I started this project from scratch and I guess, this won’t “die” an early age.

Here’s a quick recap:

My GSoC project is to package a software called Loomio.
A little about it, Loomio is a decision-making software, designed to assist groups with the collaborative decision-making process.
It is a free software web-application, where users can initiate discussions and put up proposals.

In the span of last 3 months, I worked on creating a package of Loomio for the Debian repositories. Loomio is a big, complex software to package.
With over 484 directories and 4607 files as a part of it’s code base, it has a huge number of Ruby and Node dependencies, along with a couple of fonts that it uses.
Out of which, around 72 ruby gems, 58 node modules, 3 fonts, and other 27 packages which were the reverse dependencies needed work. Both, including packaged and unpackaged libraries.

Also, little did I know about the need of having loomio-installer.
Thus a good amount of time went there as well (which I also talked about in my first and second report).

Work done so far!

At the time of writing this report, the following work has been done:

NEW packages Packages that have been uploaded to the archive:

» ruby-ahoy-matey
» ruby-aws-partitions
» ruby-aws-sdk-core
» ruby-aws-sdk-kms
» ruby-aws-sdk-s3
» ruby-aws-sigv4
» ruby-cancancan
» ruby-data-uri
» ruby-geocoder
» ruby-google-cloud-core
» ruby-google-cloud-env
» ruby-inherited-resources
» ruby-maxitest
» ruby-safely-block
» ruby-terrapin
» ruby-memory-profiler
» ruby-devise-i18n
» ruby-discourse-diff
» ruby-discriminator
» ruby-doorkeeper-i18n
» ruby-friendly-id
» ruby-google-cloud-core
» ruby-google-cloud-env
» ruby-has-scope
» ruby-has-secure-token
» ruby-heroku-deflater
» ruby-i18n-spec
» ruby-iso
» ruby-omniauth-openid-connect
» ruby-paper-trail
» ruby-referer-parser
» ruby-safely-block
» ruby-user-agent-parser
» ruby-google-cloud-translate
» ruby-maxminddb
» ruby-omniauth-ultraauth

Packages that are yet to be uploaded:

» ruby-arbre
» ruby-paperclip
» ruby-ahoy-email
» ruby-ransack
» ruby-benchmark-memory
» ruby-ammeter
» ruby-rspec-tag-matchers
» ruby-formtastic
» ruby-formtastic-i18n
» ruby-rails-serve-static-assets
» ruby-activeadmin
» ruby-rails-12factor
» ruby-rails-stdout-logging
» loomio-installer

Updated packages

» rails
» ruby-devise
» ruby-globalid
» ruby-pg
» ruby-activerecord-import
» ruby-rack-oauth2
» ruby-rugged
» ruby-task-list
» gem2deb
» node-find-up
» node-matcher
» node-supports-color
» node-array-union
» node-dot-prop
» node-flush-write-stream
» node-irregular-plurals
» node-loud-rejection
» node-make-dir
» node-tmp
» node-strip-ansi

Work left!

Whilst it is clear how big and complex Loomio is, it was not humanly possible to complete the entire package of Loomio.
At the moment, the following tasks are remaining for this project to get close to completion:

» Debug loomio-installer.
» Check what all node dependencies are not really needed.
» Package and update the needed dependencies for loomio.
» Package loomio.
» Fix autopkgtests (if humanly possible).
» Maintain it for life :D

Other Debian activites!

Debian is more than just my GSoC organisation to me.
As my NM profile says and I quote,

Debian has really been an amazing journey, an amazing place, and an amazing family!

With such lovely people and teams and with my DM hat on, I have been involved with a lot more than just GSoC. In the last 3 months, my activity within Debian (other than GSoC) can be summarized as follows.

Cloud Team

Since I’ve been interested in the work they do, I joined the team recently and currently helping in packaging image finder.

NEW packages

» python-flask-marshmallow
» python-marshmallow-sqlalchemy

Perl Team

With Gregor, Intrigeri, Yadd, Nodens, and Bremner being there, I learned Perl packaging and helped in maintaining the Perl modules.

NEW packages

» libdata-dumper-compact-perl
» libminion-backend-sqlite-perl
» libmoox-shorthas-perl
» libmu-perl

Updated packages

» libasync-interrupt-perl
» libbareword-filehandles-perl
» libcatalyst-manual-perl
» libdancer2-perl
» libdist-zilla-plugin-git-perl
» libdist-zilla-plugin-makemaker-awesome-perl
» libdist-zilla-plugin-ourpkgversion-perl
» libdomain-publicsuffix-perl
» libfile-find-object-rule-perl
» libfile-flock-retry-perl
» libgeoip2-perl
» libgraphics-colornames-www-perl
» libio-aio-perl
» libio-async-perl
» libmail-box-perl
» libmail-chimp3-perl
» libmath-clipper-perl
» libminion-perl
» libmojo-pg-perl
» libnet-amazon-s3-perl
» libnet-appliance-session-perl
» libnet-cli-interact-perl
» libnet-frame-perl
» libnetpacket-perl
» librinci-perl
» libperl-critic-policy-variables-prohibitlooponhash-perl
» libsah-schemas-rinci-perl
» libstrictures-perl
» libsisimai-perl
» libstring-tagged-perl
» libsystem-info-perl
» libtex-encode-perl
» libxxx-perl

Python Team

Since I lately learned Python packaging, there are a couple of packages that I worked on which I haven’t pushed yet, but by later this month.

» python3-dotenv
» python3-phonenumbers
» django-phonenumber-field
» django-phone-verify
» Helping newbies (thanks to DC19 talk).

JavaScript Team

Super thanks to Xavier (yadd) and Praveen for being right there. Worked on the following things.

» Helping in webpack transition (bit).
» Helping in nodejs transition.
» Helping in complying pkg-js-tools in all packages.
» Packaging dependencies of ava.
» node-d3-request
» node-find-up
» node-matcher
» node-supports-color
» node-array-union
» node-dot-prop
» node-flush-write-stream
» node-irregular-plurals
» node-loud-rejection
» node-make-dir
» node-tmp
» node-strip-ansi

Golang Team

I joined the Golang team to mostly help in doing the GitLab stuff. Thus did the following things.

» gitlab-workhorse
» gitaly
» Upstream contribution to gitaly.

Ruby Team

This is where I started from. All thanks to Praveen, Abhijith, and Raju.
In the last 3 months, except for maintaining packages for Loomio, I did the following things.

» Helping in maintaining GitLab (one of the maintainers).
» Setting the fasttrack repo; announcements soon!
» Fixing gem2deb for adding d/upstream/metadata.
» Enabling Salsa CI for 1392 packages (yes, I broke salsa :/).
» Reviewing and sponsoring packages.
» Co-chairing the Ruby Team BoF.
» And others.

Others

» Part of DC19 Content Team (thanks to Antonio).
» Part of DC19 Bursary Team (thanks to Jonathan).
» Perl sprint (DebCamp).
» Newbie’s Perspective Towards Debian talk (Open day).
» Chairing Ruby Team BoF.
» Presenting my GSoC project.
» Part of DC19 Video Team.
» Talking about Debian elsewhere (cf: mail archive).
» DC21 Indian bid ;)
» Organising MiniDebConf Goa :D

Acknowledgement :)

Never forget your roots.

And I haven’t. The last 8 months with Debian have been super amazing. Nothing I’d like to change, even if I could. Every person here is a mentor to me.
But above all, there are a couple of people who helped me immensely.
Starting with Pirate Praveen, Rajudev, Abhijith, Sruthi, Gregor, Xavier, Intrigeri, Nodens, Holger, Antonio Terceiro, Kanashiro, Boutil, Georg, Sanyam, Sakshi, Jatin, and Samyak. And of course, my little brother, Aryan.
Sorry if I’m forgetting anyone. Thank y’all :)

NOTE: Sorry for making this extremely long; someone told me to put in all the crap I did in last 90 days :P
Also, sorry if it gets too long on planet.d.o. :)

Until next time.
:wq for today.

Russ Allbery: Review: A Memory Called Empire

Sunday 25th of August 2019 11:19:00 PM

Review: A Memory Called Empire, by Arkady Martine

Series: Teixcalaan #1 Publisher: Tor Copyright: March 2019 ISBN: 1-250-18645-5 Format: Kindle Pages: 462

Mahit Dzmare grew up dreaming of Teixcalaan. She learned its language, read its stories, and even ventured some of her own poetry, in love with the partial and censored glimpses of its culture that were visible outside of the empire. From her home in Lsel Station, an independent mining station, Teixcalaan was a vast, lurking weight of history, drama, and military force. She dreamed of going there in person. She did not expect to be rushed to Teixcalaan as the new ambassador from Lsel Station, bearing a woefully out-of-date imago that she's barely begun to integrate, with no word from the previous ambassador and no indication of why Teixcalaan has suddenly demanded a replacement.

Lsel is small, precarious, and tightly managed, a station without a planet and with only the resources that it can maintain and mine for itself, but it does have a valuable secret. It cannot afford to lose vital skills to accident or age, and therefore has mastered the technology of recording people's personalities, memories, and skills using a device called an imago. The imago can then be implanted in the brain of another, giving them at first a companion in the back of their mind and, with time, a unification that grants them inherited skills and memory. Valuable expertise in piloting, mining, and every other field of importance need not be lost to death, but can be preserved through carefully tended imago lines and passed on to others who test as compatible.

Mahit has the imago of the previous ambassador to Teixcalaan, but it's a copy from five years after his appointment, and he was the first of his line. Yskandr Aghavn served another fifteen years before the loss of contact and Teixcalaan's emergency summons, never returning home to deposit another copy. Worse, the implantation had to be rushed due to Teixcalaan's demand. Rather than the normal six months of careful integration under active psychiatric supervision, Mahit has had only a month with her new imago, spent on a Teixcalaan ship without any Lsel support.

With only that assistance from home, Mahit's job is to navigate the complex bureaucracy and rich culture of an all-consuming interstellar empire to prevent the ruthlessly expansionist Teixcalaanli from deciding to absorb Lsel Station like they have so many other stations, planets, and cultures before them. Oh, and determine what happened to her predecessor, while keeping the imagos secret.

I love when my on-line circles light up with delight about a new novel, and it turns out to be just as good as everyone said it was.

A Memory Called Empire is a fascinating, twisty, complex political drama set primarily in the City at the heart of an empire, a city filled with people, computer-controlled services, factions, manuevering, frighteningly unified city guards, automated defense mechanisms, unexpected allies, and untrustworthy offers. Martine weaves a culture that feels down to its bones like an empire at the height of its powers and confidence: glorious, sophisticated, deeply aware of its history, rich in poetry and convention, inward-looking, and alternately bemused by and contemptuous of anyone from outside what Teixcalaan defines as civilization, when Teixcalaan thinks of them at all.

But as good as the setting is (and it's superb, with a deep, lived-in feel), the strength of this book is its characters. Mahit was expecting to be the relatively insignificant ambassador of a small station, tasked with trade negotiations and routine approvals and given time to get her feet under her. But when it quickly becomes clear that Yskandr was involved in some complex machinations at the heart of the Teixcalaan government, she shows admirable skill for thinking on her feet, making fast decisions, and mixing thoughtful reserve and daring leaps of judgment.

Mahit is here alone from Lsel, but she's not without assistance. Teixcalaan has assigned her an asekreta, a cultural liaison who works for the Information Ministry. Her name is Three Seagrass, and she is the best part of this book. Mahit starts wisely suspicious of her, and Three Seagrass starts carefully and thoroughly professional. But as the complexities of Mahit's situation mount, she and Three Seagrass develop a complex and delightful friendship, one that slowly builds on cautious trust and crosses cultural boundaries without ignoring them. Three Seagrass's nearly-unflappable curiosity and guidance is a perfect complement to Mahit's reserve and calculated gambits, and then inverts beautifully later in the book when the politics Mahit uncovers start to shake Three Seagrass's sense of stability. Their friendship is the emotional heart of this story, full of delicate grace notes and never falling into stock patterns.

Martine also does some things with gender and sexuality that are remarkable in how smoothly they lie below the surface. Neither culture in this novel cares much about the gender configurations of sexual partnerships, which means A Memory Called Empire shares with Nicola Griffith novels an unmarked acceptance of same-sex relationships. It's also not eager to pair up characters or put romance at the center of the story, which I greatly appreciated. And I was delighted that the character who navigates hierarchy via emotional connection and tumbling into the beds of the politically influential is, for once, the man.

I am stunned that this is a first novel. Martine has masterful control over both the characters and plot, keeping me engrossed and fully engaged from the first chapter. Mahit's caution towards her possible allies and her discovery of the lay of the political land parallel the reader's discovery of the shape of the plot in a way that lets one absorb Teixcalaanli politics alongside her. Lsel is at the center of the story, but only as part of Teixcalaanli internal maneuvering. It is important to the empire but is not treated as significant or worthy of its own voice, which is a knife-sharp thrust of cultural characterization. And the shadow of Yskandr's prior actions is beautifully handled, leaving both the reader and Mahit wondering whether he was a brilliant strategic genius or in way over his head. Or perhaps both.

This is also a book about empire, colonization, and absorption, about what it's like to delight in the vastness of its culture and history while simultaneously fearful of drowning in it. I've never before read a book that captures the tension of being an ambassador to a larger and more powerful nation: the complex feelings of admiration and fear, and the need to both understand and respect and in some ways crave the culture while still holding oneself apart. Mahit is by turns isolated and accepted, and by turns craves acceptance and inclusion and is wary of it. It's a set of emotions that I rarely see in space opera.

This is one of the best science fiction novels I've read, one that I'll mention in the same breath as Ancillary Justice or Cyteen. It is a thoroughly satisfying story, one that lasted just as long as it should and left me feeling satiated, happy, and eager for the sequel. You will not regret reading this, and I expect to see it on a lot of award lists next year.

Followed by A Desolation Called Peace, which I've already pre-ordered.

Rating: 10 out of 10

Jonathan Wiltshire: Oops

Sunday 25th of August 2019 10:30:40 PM

#bbqcaiprinahs

The post Oops appeared first on jwiltshire.org.uk.

Andrew Cater: Cambridge BBQ 2019 - 2

Sunday 25th of August 2019 07:57:43 PM
Another day with a garden full of people. A house full of coders, talkers, coffee drinkers and unexpected bread makers - including a huge fresh loaf. Playing "the DebConf card game" for the first time was confusing as anything and a lot of fun. The youngest person there turned out to be one of the toughest players.

Hotter than yesterday - 32 degrees as I've just driven back across country and the sun in my eyes.. Sorry to leave everyone there for tomorrow's end of BBQ but there'll be another opportunity.

Thanks even more to Steve, Jo and everyone there - it's been a fantastic weekend.

Andrew Cater: Cambridge BBQ 2019

Sunday 25th of August 2019 10:02:34 AM
Usual friendly Debian family chaos: a garden full of people last night: lots of chat, lots  of catching up and conviviality including a birthday cake. The house was also full: games of cards ensued last thing at night :) Highlights: home made cookies, chilli and cheese bread [and the company as always]. One of the hotter days of the year at 30 degrees.

Now folk are filtering in: coffee machine is getting a workout and breakfast is happening. Lots more folk expected gradually as the morning progresses: it's 0955 UTC as I'm typing. Today is due to be hotter, apparently. Thanks to Steve and Jo for hosting, as always.

Molly de Blanc: Free software activities (July 2019)

Sunday 25th of August 2019 07:37:13 AM

Again, much belated with apologies.

Personal
  • Debian AH rebranded to the Debian Community Team (CT) after our sprint back in June. We had meetings, both following up on things that happened at the meeting and covering typical business. We created a draft of a new team mission statement, which was premiered, so to speak, at DebConf19.
  • While I did not attend, I participated remotely in the CT and Outreach BoFs at DC19 remotely. Special thanks to the video team for making this possible.
  • The Outreach team also had a meeting.
  • The OSI had its monthly meeting, and the Standing Committee also had a meeting.
  • The OSI Staffing Committee, of which I am a member, had a meeting.
  • I had a meeting with someone interested in working with the OSI.
  • I had weekly meetings with the General Manager of the OSI.
  • Another instance of someone being mean to me on the internet. I am almost losing count.
Professional
  • I learned a lot about the GNOME ecosystem, and the toolkit that is a necessary part of it, and parts of the project that organizations use even if they’re not using the GNOME desktop environment.
  • I had several fun meetings with people about the work we’re doing at GNOME.
  • I worked on fulfilling sponsorship benefits for GUADEC. This mostly means writing social media posts, blog posts, and working with an awesome volunteer to keep the web site updated.
  • I wrote a Friends of GNOME newsletter.
  • I wrote and published a Meet the GNOMEies interview.
  • I met with the Linux App Summit organizing team concerning sponsorships and fundraising for the event. The CFP is open and you should submit!

Russ Allbery: Review: The Calculating Stars

Sunday 25th of August 2019 04:06:00 AM

Review: The Calculating Stars, by Mary Robinette Kowal

Series: Lady Astronaut #1 Publisher: Tor Copyright: July 2018 ISBN: 1-4668-6124-X Format: Kindle Pages: 429

Elma York is a (human) computer, working for the early space program in the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics in 1952. She and her husband Nathaniel, one of the lead engineers, are on vacation in the Poconos when a massive meteorite hits the Atlantic Ocean just off the coast of Maryland, wiping out Washington D.C. and much of the eastern seaboard.

Elma and Nathaniel make it out of the mountains via their private plane (Elma served as a Women Airforce Service Pilot in World War II) to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio, where the government is regrouping. The next few weeks are a chaos of refugees, arguments, and meetings, as Nathaniel attempts to convince the military that there's no way the meteorite could have been a Russian attack. It's in doing calculations to support his argument that Elma and her older brother, a meteorologist, realize that far more could be at stake. The meteorite may have kicked enough water vapor into the air to start runaway global warming, potentially leaving Earth with the climate of Venus. If this is true, humans need to get off the planet and somehow find a way to colonize Mars.

I was not a sympathetic audience for this plot. I'm all in favor of space exploration but highly dubious of colonization justifications. It's hard to imagine an event that would leave Earth less habitable than Mars already is, and Mars appears to be the best case in the solar system. We also know who would make it into such a colony (rich white people) and who would be left behind on Earth to die (everyone else), which gives these lifeboat scenarios a distinctly unappealing odor. To give her credit, Kowal postulates one of the few scenarios that might make living on Mars an attractive alternative, but I'm fairly sure the result would be the end of humanity. On this topic, I'm a pessimistic grinch.

I loved this book.

Some of that is because this book is not about the colonization. It's about the race to reach the Moon in an alternate history in which catastrophe has given that effort an international mandate and an urgency grounded in something other than great-power competition. It's also less about the engineering and the male pilots and more about the computers: Elma's world of brilliant women, many of them experienced WW2 transport pilots, stuffed into the restrictive constraints of 1950s gender roles. It's a fictionalization of Hidden Figures and Rise of the Rocket Girls, told from the perspective of a well-meaning Jewish woman who is both a victim of sexist and religious discrimination and is dealing (unevenly) with her own racism.

But that's not the main reason why I loved this book. The surface plot is about gender roles, the space program, racism, and Elma's determination to be an astronaut. The secondary plot is about anxiety, about what it does to one's life and one's thought processes, and how to manage it and overcome it, and it's taut, suspenseful, tightly observed, and vividly empathetic. This is one of the best treatments of living with a mental illness that I've read.

Elma has clinical anxiety, although she isn't willing to admit it until well into the book. But once I knew to look for it, I saw it everywhere. The institutional sexism she faces makes the reader want to fight and rage, but Elma turns defensively inward and tries to avoid creating conflict. Her main anxiety trigger is being the center of the attention of strangers, fearing their judgment and their reactions. She masks it with southern politeness and deflection and the skill of smoothing over tense situations, until someone makes her angry. And until she finds something that she wants more than she wants to avoid her panic attacks: to be an astronaut, to see space, and to tell others that they can as well.

One of the strengths of this book is Kowal's ability to write a marriage, to hint at what Elma sees in Nathaniel around the extended work hours and quietness. They play silly bedroom games, they rely on each other without a second thought, and Nathaniel knows how anxious she is and is afraid for her and doesn't know what to do. He can't do much, since Elma has to find her own treatment and her own coping mechanisms and her own way of reframing her goals, but he's quietly and carefully supportive in ways that I thought were beautifully portrayed. His side of this story is told in glimmers and moments, and the reader has to do a lot of work to piece together what he's thinking, but he quietly became one of my favorite characters in this book.

I should warn that I read a lot into this book. I hit on the centrality of anxiety to Elma's experience about halfway through and read it backwards and forwards through the book, and I admit I may be doing a lot of heavy lifting for the author. The anxiety thread is subtle, which means there's a risk that I'm manufacturing some pieces of it. Other friends who have read the book didn't notice it the way that I did, so your mileage may vary. But as someone who has some tendencies towards anxiety myself, this spoke to me in ways that made it hard to read at times but glorious in the ending. Everywhere in the book Elma got angry enough to push through her natural tendency to not make a fuss is wonderfully satisfying.

This book is set very much in its time, which means that it is full of casual, assumed institutional sexism. Elma fights it in places, but she more frequently endures it and works around it, which may not be the book that one is in the mood to read. This is a book about feminism, but it's a conditional and careful feminism that tactically cedes a lot of the cultural and conversational space.

There is also quite a lot of racism, to which Elma reacts like a well-intentioned (and somewhat anachronistic) white woman. There's a very fine line between the protagonist using some of their privilege to help others and a white savior narrative, and I'm not sure Kowal walks it successfully throughout the book. Like the sexism, the racism of the setting is deep and structural, Elma is not immune even when she thinks she's adjusting for it, and this book only pushes back against it around the edges. I appreciated the intent to show some of the complexity of intersectional oppression, but I think it lands a bit awkwardly.

But, those warnings aside, this is both a satisfying story of the early space program shifted even earlier to force less reliance on mechanical computers, and a tense and compelling story of navigating anxiety. It tackles the complex and difficult problems of conserving and carefully using one's own energy and fortitude, and of deciding what is worth getting angry about and fighting for. The first-person narrative voice was very effective for me, particularly once I started treating Elma as an unreliable narrator in denial about how much anxiety has shaped her life and started reading between the lines and looking for her coping strategies. I have nowhere near the anxiety issues that Elma has, but I felt seen by this book despite a protagonist who is apparently totally unlike me.

Although I would have ranked Record of a Spaceborn Few higher, The Calculating Stars fully deserves its Hugo, Nebula, and Locus Award wins. Highly recommended, and I will definitely read the sequel.

Followed by The Fated Sky.

Rating: 9 out of 10

Dirk Eddelbuettel: RcppExamples 0.1.9

Saturday 24th of August 2019 10:39:00 PM

A new version of the RcppExamples package is now on CRAN.

The RcppExamples package provides a handful of short examples detailing by concrete working examples how to set up basic R data structures in C++. It also provides a simple example for packaging with Rcpp.

This releases brings a number of small fixes, including two from contributed pull requests (extra thanks for those!), and updates the package in a few spots. The NEWS extract follows:

Changes in RcppExamples version 0.1.9 (2019-08-24)
  • Extended DateExample to use more new Rcpp features

  • Do not print DataFrame result twice (Xikun Han in #3)

  • Missing parenthesis added in man page (Chris Muir in #5)

  • Rewrote StringVectorExample slightly to not run afould the -Wnoexcept-type warning for C++17-related name mangling changes

  • Updated NAMESPACE and RcppExports.cpp to add registration

  • Removed the no-longer-needed #define for new Datetime vectors

Courtesy of CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for the most recent release.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

Steinar H. Gunderson: Chess article

Saturday 24th of August 2019 05:29:00 PM

Last November (!), I was interviewed for a magazine article about computer chess and how it affects human play. Only a few short fragments remain of the hour-long discussion, but the article turned out to be very good nevertheless, and now it's freely available at last. Recommended Sunday read.

Thomas Lange: New FAI.me feature

Saturday 24th of August 2019 12:29:46 PM

FAI.me, the build service for installation and cloud images has a new feature. When building an installation images, you can enable automatic reboot or shutdown at the end of the installation in the advanced options. This was implemented due to request by users, that are using the service for their VM instances or computers without any keyboard connected.

FAI.me service

FAI.me

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