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News for nerds, stuff that matters
Updated: 1 hour 3 min ago

KDE Plasma 5.20 Released

1 hour 3 min ago

Lenovo Begins Selling 30 Linux ThinkPads and ThinkStation PCs

Tuesday 20th of October 2020 08:58:02 PM

Bored Developer Creates 'DOS Subsystem For Linux'

Sunday 18th of October 2020 01:58:02 AM

Linux Journal Is Back

Friday 16th of October 2020 05:58:03 PM

Microsoft Is Bringing Edge To Linux

Wednesday 14th of October 2020 10:58:02 PM

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Now and Then: The Fate of 15 Linux Distributions

A typical desktop Linux distribution consists of various software components including the Linux kernel, a broad collection of programming tools produced by the GNU Project, a graphical server, and other free and open source software. Due to Linux’s open source nature, there are many hundreds of actively maintained distributions or ‘distros’ of the OS. Linux distros are like Linux software in general. They come and (some) go. Back in 2006, Distrowatch ranked the following distributions in terms of page hit ranking1. The top ranked distro was Ubuntu. The other places were taken by openSUSE, Fedora, MEPIS, Mandriva, Damn Small, Debian, PCLinuxOS, Slackware, Gentoo, KNOPPIX, FreeBSD, Kubuntu, VectorLinux, and CentOS. Read more

How anyone can contribute to open source software in their job

Imagine a world where your software works perfectly for you. It meets your needs, does things your way, and is the ideal tool to achieve great things toward your goals. Open source software stems from these roots. Many projects are built by engineers that have a problem and build a solution to solve it. Then they openly share their solution with others to use and improve. Unfortunately, building software is hard. Not everyone has the expertise to build software that works perfectly for their needs. And if the software developers building applications don't fully understand users' needs and how they do their job, the solutions they build may not meet the users' needs and may accidentally create a lot of gaps. Read more

5 open source tools I can't live without

Some time ago, I engaged with a Twitter thread that went viral among techies. The challenge? Pick only five tools that you cannot live without. I started to think about this in relation to my everyday life, and picking just five tools was not easy. I use many tools that I consider essential, such as my IRC client to connect with my colleagues and friends (yes, I still use IRC), a good text editor to hack on things, a calendar app to keep organized, and a videoconferencing platform when more direct interaction is needed. So let me put a twist on this challenge: Pick just five open source tools that boost your productivity. Here's my list; please share yours in the comments. Read more

How to Install Microsoft Edge Browser in Ubuntu and Other Linux

This guide explains the steps required to install Microsoft Edge Browser in Ubuntu and Other Linux. We explain both graphical and UI methods. Read more