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August 2005

Freespire changes name, Linspire goes free (as in beer) for a time

Filed under
Linux

In a short story with a happy ending, the developer of a "free" version of Linspire called Freespire has agreed to change the name of his project, and Linspire Inc. is offering free copies of Linspire Linux "for a few days."

Linux And Windows Square Off In Another Round Of TCO Testing

Filed under
OS

Just as the debate over whether Linux or Windows is cheaper to deploy and manage was threatening to become old hat, IBM on Wednesday fired the latest salvo by promoting two reports it sponsored.

States expand push for sales taxes on Internet purchases

Filed under
Misc

Come this fall, 13 states will start encouraging — though not demanding — that online businesses collect sales taxes just as Main Street stores are required to do.

Apple OS X runs just fine on AMD CPUs

Filed under
Mac

First, this is not the VMWare hack, it was installed on the notebook, so presumably the source has access to a legit copy of the OS. Next, it supposedly installed without a hitch, and everything down to the wireless card worked like a charm. Lastly, it was an AMD64 model, from the look of it, and it is most likely this one.

Linux trademark letter result pleases lawyer

Filed under
Linux

A lawyer acting on behalf of Linus Torvalds has hailed as "favourable" the fact one in nine Australian vendors targeted by a letter campaign asking them to relinquish any legal claim to the 'Linux' name have agreed to do so.

Supersizing the supercomputers: What's next?

Filed under
Hardware

Supercomputers excel at highly calculation-intensive tasks, yet supercomputers themselves are subject to technological advancements and redesigns that allow them to keep pace with the science they support.

Korea Post to Adopt Linux

Filed under
Linux

Korea's postal service agency, Wednesday announced it will begin adopting the free, open-source operating system known as Linux to its desktop computers.

Regulating phone companies' security standards

Filed under
Security

A new age crime for new age technology, is about thieves trying to steal identities and the phone companies doing little to protect subscribers' personal data from being revealed.

Serial ATA vs. Parallel IDE

Filed under
Hardware

Over the past few years SATA has become a standard interface on hard drives and is starting to show up in many peripheral devices. Today we're taking a look at two similar hard drives to see how well SATA is supported in Linux.

Five mistakes GNU/Linux neophytes make

Filed under
Linux

New users tend to make some common mistakes when trying out GNU/Linux for the first time. The reasons for these mistakes are varied. Here are some solutions to five commonly encountered GNU/Linux problems.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Recovering audio from a lost format with open source

Back in the early 2000s, we made a family decision to upgrade the living room stereo. The equipment in place at the time was based on a collection of gear that I had purchased some 20 years earlier when I first had a steady post-university income. That early collection could best be described as "industrial chic," most notably the Hafler amplifiers I had built from kits and the Polk speakers made from some kind of composite wood product and finished with an ugly faux-rosewood vinyl wrap. They produced decent sound, but the dorm-room-style decor just wasn't working out in the living room. Those of you who remember the early 2000s will recall that most of the world was still consuming music on CD. Our family was no exception, and we ended up with a fine CD player that had an interesting feature—it was able to decode regular CDs as well as high-definition-compatible digital (HDCD) discs. According to Wikipedia, HDCD is a proprietary audio encode-decode process that claims to provide increased dynamic range over that of standard Red Book audio CDs, while retaining backward compatibility with existing compact disc players. Read more

today's howtos

Linus Torvalds: "I Hope AVX512 Dies A Painful Death"

Linux creator Linus Torvalds had some choice words today on Advanced Vector Extensions 512 (AVX-512) found on select Intel processors. In a mailing list discussion stemming from the Phoronix article this week on the compiler instructions Intel is enabling for Alder Lake (and Sapphire Rapids), Linus Torvalds chimed in. The Alder Lake instructions being flipped on in GCC right now make no mention of AVX-512 but only AVX2 and others, likely due to Intel pursuing the subset supported by both the small and large cores in this new hybrid design being pursued. Read more Also: The Linux Team Approves New Neutral Terminology background on AVX-512