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January 2006

Google? Linux? Goobuntu? Boulderdash!

Filed under
Google

According to reports, there will be a "Ubuntu desktop Linux distribution, based on Debian and the Gnome desktop, it is known internally as 'Goobuntu.'" King goes on to state, "Google has confirmed it is working on a desktop linux project."

I wish I could buy this report, but I can't.

Mozilla Reborn: SeaMonkey 1.0 Is Released

Filed under
Moz/FF

While Firefox and Thunderbird are the poster children of open-source Internet application success, the program suite they sprang from, Mozilla, was reborn Jan. 30 under a new name: SeaMonkey.

Massachusetts Names New CIO

Filed under
OSS

The state of Massachusetts has found a new chief information officer, putting Louis Gutierrez in the hot seat as the government continues its push toward adopting the OpenDocument Format (ODF).

UK Linux guru backs GPL 3

Filed under
OSS

Linus Torvalds may have his doubts, but Alan Cox is supporting the next version of the GPL. Cox told ZDNet UK that he thinks many of the changes in GPL 3 are sound.

Launch of SpreadKDE.org Promotional Community Site

Filed under
KDE

The KDE marketing group is pleased to announce the release of SpreadKDE.org, the new home for KDE's promotional activities.

Do you know someone who knows someone?

Filed under
KDE

Do you know someone or someone who knows someone that works somewhere deserves recognition for their work with KDE. We've been interviewing individuals for some time now, but what about the associated organizations? Do you know someone to nominate?

My desktop OS: Ubuntu

Filed under
Linux

A few months ago I selected Ubuntu 5.10 (Breezy Badger) as the new operating system on the Acer TravelMate T290LMI notebook I use at home and for work. In past years I tried other Linux distributions and always returned to Windows. Now I'm sticking with Ubuntu, but I haven't been able to give up Windows altogether yet.

Novell targets the SMB market with partnerships

Filed under
SUSE

On January 30th, Novell Inc. announced that it will start bundling support and training offerings with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for small and medium-sized businesses via its channel partners.

This news came only days after Novell announced that, as of March 1st, the Linux company will no longer force users into CLAs.

More in Tux Machines

Best Free and Open Source Alternatives to Apple Photos

In 2020, Apple began the Apple silicon transition, using self-designed, 64-bit ARM-based Apple M1 processors on new Mac computers. Maybe it’s the perfect time to move away from the proprietary world of Apple, and embrace the open source Linux scene. Apple Photos is a photo management and editing application. It lets you organize your collection into albums, or keep your photos organized automatically with smart albums. What are the best free and open source alternatives? Read more

Top 15 Window Managers for Linux

A window manager is a software responsible for the placement and appearance of windows of various applications. It allows you to use any number of displays and utilize the screen to its full potential. The advantage is that it increases your productivity and improves your multitasking experience. But what exactly can one do with a window manager? The article describes some of the best floating and tiling window managers available for Linux. Read more

Endless OS Review - Desktop Linux Done Right for the Masses

We review the popular Endless OS as Linux Desktop with the new features and updates of the latest version 4.0. Read more

today's howtos

  • How to Install PostgreSQL 14 in Ubuntu 20.04

    There are specific database software attributes that make PostgreSQL stand out against other database platforms. The first and obvious attribute is its open-source nature. This PostgreSQL trait puts it on continuous developmental milestones. Both its community and developers seek to evolve PostgreSQL into an enterprise-class performing software. Existing PostgreSQL community platforms help users deal with emerging bugs, and also understand its various functionalities and use cases. Other PostgreSQL strengths are in its unique functions like Store Procedure, Diverse Indexing Techniques, Flexible Full-text search, Diversified Extension Functions, and Diverse kind of Replication.

  • How to upload an ISO image to the Proxmox Server - Unixcop the Unix / Linux the admins deams

    Hello, friends. We have already shown you how to install Proxmox and we noticed that the process is easier than you might think. Now I will show you how to upload an ISO image to the Proxmox server. To do this, I will use the graphical method or through the terminal. With Proxmox we will be able to virtualize systems professionally and to do many things more like cluster, backups, and others. However, to start with the virtualization we have to have an ISO image of the system. So, with a server that is far away from our location, how to do it? How to have the ISO image on the server so that Proxmox can manage it? Well, that’s what I will show you today. Let’s go for it.

  • How to install FreeOffice 2021 on Ubuntu 20.04 Linux - Linux Shout

    One of the best free alternatives to Microsoft Office is FreeOffice, developed by a German software company- SoftMaker. Recently, they have upgraded their Office suite to version 21. And here we learn the steps to install FreeOffice 2021 version on Ubuntu 20.04 Linux using the command terminal. This free office suite is a part of the commercial one from the same developers known as SoftMaker Office 21 (also available for Linux), of course, the premium will have more features but that doesn’t mean the free version- FreeOffice 2021 deprives to full fill all daily office documents (MS-Word alternative) related requirements. It offers a Microsoft office ribbon-like interface and three modules- TextMaker 21 to create documents; PlanMaker 21 to create sheets (Excel alternative) and Presentations 21 for making slides like MS-Powerpoint.

  • How to verify checksum on Linux | FOSS Linux

    A checksum is small-sized data obtained from a block of digital data used to detect errors. The checksum value uses a transmission message to represent bit numbers. Extensively, it has been used and still is in use by IT experts to detect high-level errors that might happen during data transmission. Before transmission, every bit of data is assigned a checksum value after running a cryptographic hash function. Checksum sometimes is termed as a hash sum or hash value. It is a long data string that contains various numbers and letters. They work by providing the receiving end information about the data transmission to deliver the full range of data. Checksum acts as a fingerprint for files since it contains a long string of numbers and letters. It aids in obtaining the number of bits included in a transmission. Suppose the checksum value calculated by the end-user is slightly different from the original checksum value of the file. In that case, it alerts all parties involved in the transmission that a third party corrupted the file. The receiver can then investigate what went wrong or try re-downloading the file. Standard protocols used to determine checksum numbers are the transmission control protocol (TCP) and the user diagram protocol (UDP). TCP is more reliable for tracking transmitted packets of data, but UDP may be beneficial to avoid slowing down transmission time.

  • How to create and extract cpio archives on Linux Examples

    Although the cpio archiving utility is nowadays used less than other archiving tools like tar, it is still good to know how it works, since it is still used, for example, to create initramfs images on Linux and for rpm packages, which are used mainly in the Red Hat family of distributions. In this tutorial we see how to create and extract cpio archives using the GNU cpio utility, and how to obtain a list of the files they contain.

  • How to hash passwords on Linux

    Passwords should never be stored as plain text. Whether we are talking about a web application or an operating system, they should always be in hash form (on Linux, for example, hashed passwords are stored in the /etc/shadow file). Hashing is the process through which, by the use of some complex algorithms, a password is turned into a different string. Such process is one-way: there is no way to revert an hashed password to its original, plain text form. Hashing often involves the use of random data as additional input for the hash algorithm, so that the same password, hashed two times, doesn’t produce the same result. This random data is called salt. In this tutorial we explore some methods we can use to hash passwords on Linux.

  • A Decade with Jekyll

    Today I’d like to look back on my experience with Jekyll, the static site generator (SSG) that I’m using to publish this site and my other blogs Meta Redux and Emacs Redux. Back in the day Jekyll was a trend-setter - it basically defined the SSG category and every subsequent tool in it was compared to Jekyll. A lot has happened since 2011: [...]

  • ZFS Storage pool layout: VDEVs

    The storage pool of ZFS constitutes one or more virtual devices that are, in general, called vdevs. A Vdev is either a single disk, or two or more disks which mirrors each other, or a group of disks that organizes together. The RAID layout sets on each vdev as opposed to the storage pool. Similarly, data that is present in the storage pool strips across all vdevs which also means that the loss of one vdev would result in pool failure.

  • [Old] The Basic Guide to Working with ZFS

    RAID-Z1 replaces RAID5 in a traditional setup. Performance is pretty equivalent, but the benefit is in some of the features. As mentioned before, you get healing or at least detection of bit rot or a bad sector, it’s a lot easier to set up with mixed drives, etc. RAID-Z2 (equivalent to RAID6) performs better from my experience than any traditional RAID6 setup I’ve used with equivalent drives on an equivalent machine.