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November 2006

CMS pros and cons

Filed under
Software

We know there’s some of you still confused about all the CMS babble spreading around the web, so we thought it’d be a good idea to put together the top 10 pros and cons web designers should take into consideration when pondering on whether or not using a CMS app.

When Linux Runs Out of Memory

Filed under
Linux

Perhaps you rarely face it, but once you do, you surely know what's wrong: lack of free memory, or Out of Memory (OOM). The results are typical: you can no longer allocate more memory and the kernel kills a task (usually the current running one). Heavy swapping usually accompanies this situation, so both screen and disk activity reflect this.

Housekeeping utilities for Debian packages

Filed under
Linux

For all the efficiency and continued evolution of Debian's APT tools, some gaps in package management functionality remain. One of the largest ones is that, when a package is removed, any other packages that depend on it are not removed. The result is a growing number of orphans on the system. You can turn to a group of housekeeping tools that make maintaining your Debian system easier and more efficient.

Discover the Ajax Toolkit Framework for Eclipse

Filed under
News

The Ajax Toolkit Framework (ATF) is a core piece of the new Open Ajax initiative, which aims to increase accessibility to the powerful Web programming technique through the Eclipse Foundation. This article includes a HelloWorld example in which you install and configure the ATF, then use Eclipse and Dojo to create a basic Web application.

Updated in more ways than one

Filed under
Just talk

Here's what's new in the life of Spinlock... it's been awhile since I last blogged, but a lot has happened in the past month and it's time to bring everybody up to date. More on Slack 11, look-alikes, Linux on a laptop, and why you shouldn't judge a Macbook by your imagination after the jump.

FizzBall - A well designed enjoyable game for Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Anybody who has played games on their PC will be familiar with a classic game called Breakout where you have to bounce a ball with a paddle and smash all the bricks. While this game in its original make does not sport any special features, it has helped spawn a number of breakout clones.

Is There Perfection in The Linux Kernel?

Filed under
Linux

In a perfect world, you could compile a brand-new Linux kernel without the need for much configuration and without error. According to Linus Torvalds, the new 2.6.19 Linux kernel is such an entity.

Trust is key in open source

Filed under
OSS

The key to making an open source business model work lies is one word. Trust. The community must trust that the vendor is going to stay true to the open source path.

Also: Jono Bacon: On Trust

How to install Puppy Linux onna stick

Filed under
HowTos

I must confess that I have a new love, a fling if you will. That love is Puppy Linux. Puppy Linux how do I love thee? Let me count the ways. I can plug my 512 MB USB stick into my IBM M52 and be operating in a Linux environment in less than a minute and a half, all without touching the hard drive. Here’s my rough and tumble guide.

Microsoft vs. Linux: An Updated Perspective

Filed under
OS

In the war between Microsoft and those that support Linux, there have been many phases. Most of this war, like most wars, has been concealed by the “fog of war” and propaganda from both camps.

More in Tux Machines

Polishing of KDE and Adding Git Support to Kate

  • This week in KDE: fixing all the things

    Plasma 5.17 was released this week to glowing reviews! As with most new releases, our loyal users wasted no time in finding all the bugs we missed! So you know what that means, right? We all burned the midnight oil fixing the problems you found, and Plasma 5.17.1 will be released in just a few days with everything we’ve knocked out so far (detailed below) so never fear!

  • KDE Continues Seeing A Lot Of Bug Fixes, Continued Tweaks Around System Settings

    KDE developers remain busy this autumn on addressing bugs in the recent KDE Plasma 5.17 release and tackling early feature work for Plasma 5.18. Plus work on KDE Frameworks 5 and KDE Applications is as busy as ever.

  • Working around the Wrong Cursor bug

    This is a long-known bug with countless Reddit/Forum/… posts with often the correct answer how to fix it.

  • RFC - Git Client Integration

    At this year’s KDE conference Akademy we discussed how to evolve Kate over the next years. One of the areas we want to improve is better git integration out of the box. Currently, Kate ships the Projects plugin, which automatically detects and loads your file structure from your git repository. If a project is loaded, then the Search & Replace plugin allows to search&replace in all project files. In addition, the Quick Open feature also supports opening files from the currently active project - all explained here. However, the Projects plugin does not provide any real git integration: You can neither pull nor push, commit, diff, etc. If at all, additional git functionality is available only via external tools like gitk or git-cola (e.g. available in the context menu). This is something we would like to change by having really nice git integration.

today's howtos

Games: Humble and Five-or-More Modernisation in GNOME

  • Humble Monthly will be changing to Humble Choice later this year

    If you're interested in getting a bunch of games each month, the Humble Monthly has at times been quite generous with the selection. Things are about to change, with it being renamed to Humble Choice with new options. Currently, you pay a set fee of $12 a month (or less for more months) and get at least one game to play early. Then at the end of each month, they give you a bunch more games ranging between 7-11. That's changing sometime later this year with Humble Choice. As the name suggests, it does seem to actually give you a little more control. Games are revealed upfront instead of being a mystery and you pick the ones you want from a larger list.

  • Imperator: Rome is getting a free Punic Wars content pack in addition to the big Livy update

    One piece of PDXCON news missed from yesterday: Imperator: Rome is getting a free Punic Wars Content Pack along with the upcoming Livy Update. Paradox Development Studio sure are busy. Not only are they working on multiple Stellaris expansions, Crusader Kings III and Hearts of Iron IV: La Résistance they're also trying to turn around the rough launch of Imperator: Rome. Another big free patch is coming out named Livy which will include: a new character experience system, a rework of the family system, a procedurally generated mission system, a map with greater details including showing war on the map with burning cities and more not yet announced. It's going to be big!

  • Five-or-More Modernisation: It's a Wrap

    As probably most of you already know, or recently found out, at the beginning of this week the GSoC coding period officially ended, and it is time for us, GSoC students, to submit our final evaluations and the results we achieved thus far. This blog post, as you can probably tell from the title, will be a summary of all of the work I put into modernising Five or More throughout the summer months. My main task was rewriting Five or More in Vala since this simple and fun game did not find its way to the list of those included in the Games Modernisation Initiative. This fun, strategy game consists of aligning, as often as possible, five or more objects of the same shape and color, to make them disappear and score points. Besides the Vala rewrite, there were also some other tasks included, such as migrating to Meson and dropping autotools, as well as keeping the view and logic separated and updating the UI to make this game more relatable for the public and more fresh-looking. However, after thoroughly discussing the details with my mentor, Robert Roth (IRC: evfool), more emphasis was placed upon rewriting the code to Vala, since the GSoC program is specifically designed for software development. However, slight UI modifications were integrated as to match the visual layout guidelines.

  • Five-or-More Modernisation: Now You Can Properly Play It

    As Google Summer of Code is officially drawing to an end, all of my attention was focused towards making the Five or More Vala version feature-complete. As you probably already know from my previous blog post, the game was somehow playable at that time, but it was missing some of the key features included in the old version. So what’s new this time? First and foremost, you can surely notice the game board now sports a grid, which wasn’t there until now. On the same note, there are also animations used for clicking a piece on the board, for an improved gaming experience. For further accessibility, some header bar hints are available at different stages in the game: at the start of any new game, at the end of each game, as well as whenever there is no clear path between the initial position and the cell indicated by the user for the current move.

Linux 5.4-rc4

This release cycle remains pretty normal. In fact, the rc's have been a bit on the smaller side of the average of the last few releases, and rc4 continues this, if only barely. The stats all look fairly normal too. About half is drivers, with networking being the bulk of it, but there's stuff all over the place: drm, input, block, md, gpio, irqchip... The networking backlog shows up outside of drivers too, with core networking changes being about a third of the non-driver part of the patches. But there's the usual arch updates (arm64, x86, xtensa), and a noticeable chunk of mm fixes from Andrew. And the rest is miscellaneous all over - Documentation, core kernel, filesystems, gdb scripting, tools. But none of it is really all that big or looks all that scary or unusual. Shortlog appended so that you can scroll through it and get a feeling for the details. I'm traveling this week before Open Source Summit Europe, but if things stay this calm it shouldn't even be noticeable. Linus

Read more Also: Linux 5.4-rc4 Arrives As Another Normal Release Candidate