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August 2008

Novell's third-quarter loss widens, but Linux booms by 30 percent

Filed under
SUSE

cnet.com: Novell beat Wall Street's estimates with a solid third quarter, but the real story is in its continued Linux growth. The company reported that annual adjusted operating margin to be between eight to ten percent, up from earlier expected seven to nine percent. So, things are looking up.

Also: CIOs: Finally Falling for Novell Again?

ATI R500: Mesa vs. Catalyst Benchmarking

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: With Mesa 7.1 having been released this week and the open-source R600/770 3D support just around the corner, we've taken this opportunity to see how the open-source Mesa 3D stack compares to AMD's monthly-refined Catalyst Linux Suite with the fglrx driver performs for the Radeon X1000 (R500) series.

Drupal, Dries, Acquia and Community Contributions

Filed under
Drupal

communitythugs.wordpress: Drupal is a fantastic open source content management framework which has been getting rave reviews from some of the best industry experts. This was all great for first 5 years.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Linux jumps to 13.4 percent of the stalling server market

  • Ubuntu Works
  • The importance of the Veoh decision
  • Understanding SUSE Linux X Window System
  • Asus eee 901 - A Real Disappointment
  • Why open source has a hard time in government
  • Researchers offer new way to avoid bogus Web sites
  • From Firefox user to Extend Firefox contest winner
  • A Beginner’s Guide to Firefox Extensions
  • Mozilla Gets Google's Moolah for 3 More Years
  • More thoughts on open source piracy
  • 'Mindanao concerns' defer RP int'l open source summit
  • Public policy and open source
  • Microsoft patents Page Up & Page Down
  • compiz-fusion: Cylinder anyone?
  • Netbook sales will not affect notebook sales near term
  • O’Reilly’s Python for Unix and Linux System Administrators
  • NVIDIA Releases Yet Another Linux Driver

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Short Tip: Work around rpm lockups

  • Viewing the Night Sky with Linux, Part I: KStars
  • Setup and Configure openSUSE 11.0
  • How to install dock on linux without graphic card?
  • How to play VCD on Linux using VLC
  • Extract and Save Images From a PDF File
  • Online Encyclopedia Shell Script For Linux And Unix
  • setting up ubuntu on the eee pc 901
  • Playing MP3 music files in Linux
  • font anatomy

KDE Momentum Continues with New Updates, Features

Filed under
KDE

eweek.com: The KDE community has released KDE 3.5.10, a maintenance release for the KDE 3.5 series of the popular Linux desktop. KDE 3.5.10 includes improvements in the KDE Kicker, which is the KDE application starter panel, and KPDF, the desktop's PDF viewer.

Dillo2 coming in September

Filed under
Software

kmandla.wordpress: Imagine my complete and utter surprise after accidentally clicking on the Dillo home page link, and seeing a new branch of dillo is scheduled for release in late September or early October 2008.

ASUS' Big Development

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

John C. Dvorak: The most interesting story the media is downplaying is the ASUS announcement that it will have a ROM boot chip on all its motherboards, which will boot Linux instantly on start-up. This development is important, since 90 percent of the time all a user wants to do is surf the Web.

Developing software on an open source stack

Filed under
News

There are also more tools than ever, and all the most innovative tools are open source. This tutorial provides an expansive survey of the free software available to developers to create and deploy Web applications.

Mint 5 Revision 1

Filed under
Linux

bmc.com/blogs: I have made no secret here of my love for Mint. In the pantheon of Linux distros (and that is a huge pantheon full of worthies), it is the one that just works for me more than any other that I have tried. So I took the opportunity to install the new Mint 5 Revision 1 to the Dell laptop.

More in Tux Machines

Critical Linux Kernel Vulnerability Patched in Ubuntu 19.10 and 18.04.4 LTS

Discovered by Manfred Paul, the security vulnerability (CVE-2020-8835) was found in Linux kernel’s BPF (Berkeley Packet Filter) verifier, which incorrectly calculated register bounds for certain operations. This could allow a local attacker to either expose sensitive information (kernel memory) or gain administrative privileges and run programs as root user. The security issue affects all Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) and Ubuntu 18.04.4 LTS (Bionic Beaver) releases running Linux kernel 5.3 on 64-bit, Raspberry Pi, KVM, as well as cloud environments like AWS, Azure, GCP, GKE, and Oracle Cloud. Read more

Flatpak 1.7 Enters Development with New Features and Improvements

The Flatpak 1.7 series debuts with a major change, namely simplified installation of the OSTree P2P (Peer-to-peer) support. As such, Flatpak 1.7 and later versions will no longer support installing apps from local network peers. Additionally, sideloading from a local USB stick will no longer be automatic and users must enable the feature by configuring a sideload repository. The sideload repository can be created by symlinking to it from /var/lib/flatpak/sideload-repos or /run/flatpak/sideload-repos, said Alexander Larsson, who promises that the P2P support will be more efficient due to this change. The first release in the Flatpak 1.7 unstable series also introduces new “host-etc” and “host-os” file system permissions to give access to system /usr and /etc. Read more

Ubuntu 20.04 GNOME X.Org vs. Wayland Session Performance Impact For Gaming

In the past using the Wayland-based GNOME Shell session and other Wayland compositors has generally resulted in a performance hit in going through (X)Wayland but that is much less so these days. Here are some initial benchmarks of Ubuntu 20.04 running various Steam Linux gaming benchmarks both under the default X.Org-based session and then again when using the Wayland session and its (X)Wayland support. Read more

Where are the best GNOME communities

As with all open source projects, GNOME is developed by volunteers as well as employees. These people communicate in many ways to drive the project forward. For development, the old way is mailing lists for discussion and repository sites for the actual code and issue tracking. When you want something that does not exist yet or have a problem you cannot solve, you need to find the communities passionate about GNOME. This takes a bit of effort, so here are some places to start. If you start developing, you need to find a community that talks your programming language. Many will also deal with GNOME, as a side effect if not as their main activity. Read more