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July 2010

An Accurate Comparison of Perl 5 and Rakudo Star

Filed under
Software

modernperlbooks.com: Rakudo Star is a useful and usable subset of Perl 6 you can use right now. It does not implement the complete Perl 6.0 specification, and it's by no means the final release.

Interview of the Free Software Foundation

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

zeropaid.com: Open source has been in the media for quite some time whether directly or indirectly. With ACTA leak and the ASCAP letter two big news items that affects open source, we decided to sit down with the Free Software Foundation and talk about these.

GhostBSD 1.5 Screenshots

Filed under
BSD

easylinuxcds.com: GhostBSD 1.5 is based on the FreeBSD live CD however because this release is a little larger it comes on as a live DVD. As of this release GhostBSD is completely installable by issuing a list of commands and pc-sysinstall.

Why the risk of running as root is overblown

tuxteam.com: “Don’t run as root” is an oft-repeated mantra of *nix security. While I agree 100%, it’s not as big on the desktop as some would think. I’d like to point out why here.

Is OpenSolaris About To Be Forked?

Filed under
OS

phoronix.com: There are still a few weeks left before the deadline that demands Oracle appoint a community liaison for their OpenSolaris operating system. However, some OpenSolaris community developers have already had enough: they've begun work on a new project.

Distribution - A Brief History

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: Add one part GNU, one part Linux kernel, stir lightly, bake for 19 years, and you get 452 different meals.

My life in Linux

Filed under
Linux
  • Man Driver - Mandriva Linux
  • Mepis Mepis Mepis
  • Sabayon - no, I dont know what it means!

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 134 is out

Filed under
SUSE

We are pleased to announce our brand new openSUSE Weekly News 134! Smile

NVIDIA's Dead Open-Source Driver Gets Updated

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Back in March an announcement came out of NVIDIA that they would be dropping support for the xf86-video-nv driver. However, today they have decided to release an updated driver.

Also: NVIDIA Puts Out Two Drivers, Including For OpenGL 4.1

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Free Resources For Getting Your GIMP Graphics Game On
  • Samsung Open Sources Captivate’s Code
  • 5 lessons for win-win open source projects
  • full circle magazine Issue 39 Ready
  • Negroponte Offers OLPC Technology for $35 Tablet
  • openSUSE 11.3 LiveCD with MeeGo desktop
  • Kubuntu gets Global Menu
  • Snort Creator Slams Open Source IDS Suricata
  • Festbox for building new speech synthesis voices
  • Open Source IDS Wars: You Were There

More in Tux Machines

Manjaro vs. Ubuntu – which is better for you?

If you are a person associated with Computer technology and spend most of the time in the open-source arena, you must have heard or worked with some of the popular Linux distributions we have in the market. Some of the names that you will never miss are; Ubuntu, Arch Linux, Debian, and Mint. Despite Linux having more than 600 distros available today, I tend to believe there is that one distribution that everyone has a soft spot for. That could be because of its performance, stability, software availability, or a specific feature not available in other distribution. In this article, we will put our focus on two Linux distributions. The first is Ubuntu, one of the most popular distributions with its first release made on October 20, 2004. The other is Manjaro, which is regarded as a much smaller and emerging distribution with its first release on July 10, 2011. We will compare these two distros across a few key areas and give a brief review of both distributions. Read more

today's leftovers

  • 11 Best Free Test Automation Tools

    Modern software testing requires solutions that are faster and smarter. A test automation framework is a set of best practices, assumptions, common tools, and libraries that help quality-assurance testers assess the functionality, security, usability, and accessibility of multiple web and mobile applications. This type of framework help makes your test automation code reusable, maintainable, and stable. At their heart, they let you carry out tests automatically and produce test results without human intervention. Apply automation to tasks that are repetitive. Modern software development relies heavily on automation, from analyzing source code looking for errors to testing to the build, packaging and deploy process. That’s the scenario where a test automation tool becomes useful. It’s very important to select the best set of test automation tools for your specific needs and requirements. There’s lots of tools available which makes selection somewhat problematic. You don’t need to spend money on test automation software as there’s a great range of free and open source tools, libraries, and testing frameworks available. Here’s our recommendations to start your automation journey. All of the programs are free and open source goodness with the exception of Katalon Studio, which is freeware.

  • Healthcare industry proof of concept successfully uses SPDX as a software bill of materials format for medical devices

    Software Package Data Exchange (SPDX) is an open standard for communicating software bill of materials (SBOM) information that supports accurate identification of software components, explicit mapping of relationships between components, and the association of security and licensing information with each component. The SPDX format has recently been submitted by the Linux Foundation and the Joint Development Foundation to the JTC1 committee of the ISO for international standards approval. A group of eight healthcare industry organizations, composed of five medical device manufacturers and three healthcare delivery organizations (hospital systems), recently participated in the first-ever proof of concept (POC) of the SPDX standard for healthcare use. [...] The original POC was able to validate the conclusions of the NTIA Working Group that proprietary SBOM formats specific to healthcare industry verticals are not needed. This 2020 POC showed that the SPDX standard could be used as an open format for SBOMs for use by healthcare industry providers. Additionally, the ability to import the SPDX format into SIEM solutions will help HDOs adequately understand the operational and cyber risks of medical device software components from their originating supply chain. There is work ahead to improve automation of SPDX-based SBOMs, including the automated identification of software components and determining which component vulnerabilities are exploitable in a given system. Participating HDOs intend to perform compensating control exercises to identify and implement risk reduction techniques building on this information. HDOs are also evaluating how SPDX can support other improvements to vulnerability management. In summary, this POC showed that SPDX could be an essential part of addressing today’s operational and cyber risks.

  • WordPress.com Announces an All-New P2 for Remote Team Collaboration

    Today WordPress.com publicly launched an all-new version of its remote work collaboration tool P2 — the "secret sauce" behind Automattic's 15-year success as a fully distributed company, with over 1,200 employees working from 77 countries. It's the first time ever that P2 has been released as a standalone product for small and large teams to collaborate.

  • Top web browsers 2020: Firefox ends a sorta/kinda recovery as share losses return

    According to data published Saturday by metrics vendor Net Applications, Chrome's share during July rose eight-tenths of a percentage point, the most since March, to 71%. The browser has been on a seven-month run of gains, adding 4.4 percentage points to its account since January. The only other browsers to enjoy a positive 2020 thus far: Microsoft's – Edge and Internet Explorer (IE) – and that pair increased their combined share by less than a 10th of Chrome's.

  • LLVM 10.0.0 imported into -current

    With this commit and several more, Patrick Wildt (patrick@) upgraded -current to version 10.0.0 of LLVM: [...]

  • How to run Steam on Chromebook computers

    Steam is one of the most popular gaming platforms and a very powerful digital distribution service. While Steam officially is supported on Windows, Mac, and Linux, what about Chromebooks? It’s possible, though the experience isn’t perfect and there’s a few catches involved in the process.

  • Racing game 'DRAG' with impressive visuals enters Early Access on August 11

    With impressive visuals and a 4-way contact point traction physics system, DRAG looks awesome and it's going to enter Early Access with Linux PC support on August 11. Orontes Games have been working on their custom tech for the past few years, to bring us something exciting in the world of racing. It's quite an usual racing game too, merging together an arcade-style with lots of simulation going on resulting in highly dynamic situations. Going by the demo we played during the Summer Festival on Steam, it had a lot of promise and was pretty good fun.

  • Nvidia tries to get its hands on Arm

    That is because Arm is not a normal company. The firm’s core products are a set of fundamental designs for computer chips called instruction-set architectures (ISAs). Arm sells access to ISAs to the likes of Apple, Qualcomm and Huawei, giving those firms freedom to design and manufacture Arm chips however they want. The powerful chips in Apple’s iPhones are the product of this process, as are those in just about every smartphone in the world. Arm also creates its own chip designs, which it calls “cores”, and licenses them to companies that need a cookie-cutter starting-point for chips to put in their devices, as well as cars, connected fridges or anything else hooked up to the internet. As a result, Arm is everywhere.

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  • Renewed Interest in OpenStack Bare Metal Project Ironic, as Software Moves Closer to Hardware

    As more enterprises move to hybrid cloud, they're relying more and more on provisioning bare metal servers to augment cloud providers' services in order to make their infrastructure cloud neutral.

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  • TARS: Contributing to an open source microservices ecosystem

    The pandemic has thrown our global society into a health and economic crisis. It seems like there are conflicts every day from all over the world. Today, I want to remind you that open source is one of the great movements where collaboration, working together, and getting along is the essence of what we do.  Open source is not a zero-sum game, but it has had an incredible impact on us in a net positive way. I like to remind everyone that open source is public goods that will be freely available to everyone worldwide, no matter what wind of political or economic change brings us. The LF is dedicated to all of that. 

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  • Docker: Containers Healthy Despite Economy

    In spite of the economic downturn brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic, it appears the development of container applications remains robust. Docker Inc. is reporting more than 11 billion pulls from the Docker Hub in July. The company also revealed the number of repositories on Docker Hub has grown to 7 million from 6 million in the last year, while the number of Docker Hub users has grown to 7 million from 5 million in the same period.

Proprietary Software Leftovers

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Miscellany

  • Nominations open for 2021 Red Hat Innovation Awards

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that it is accepting nominations for the 2021 Red Hat Innovation Awards. Since 2007, the Red Hat Innovation Awards have recognized organizations from around the world and across industries for the transformative projects and outstanding results they have experienced with Red Hat's open source solutions. Open source has helped transform technology from the datacenter to the cloud and the Red Hat Innovation Awards showcase its transformative impact in organizations around the world.

  • Red Hat Virtualization 4.4 brings new features for managing virtual machines

    Red Hat today introduced a new version of its virtualization platform, Red Hat Virtualization 4.4, that will help customers more easily manage their applications and give its hybrid cloud strategy a boost in the process. Red Hat Virtualization is an alternative to VMware Inc.’s vSphere. The platform runs on the IBM Corp. subsidiary’s widely used enterprise Linux distribution, RHEL, and provides features for managing large fleets of virtualized applications. Red Hat Virtualization 4.4 has been updated with support for the latest release of RHEL that Red Hat launched in April. That release, officially RHEL 8.2, introduced performance improvements as well as monitoring features that make it easier to identify security and reliability issues. Red Hat Virtualization customers can now take advantage of those enhancements by upgrading the operating system installations in their deployments.

  • Critical API security risks: 10 best practices [Ed: By Security Evangelist and Strategist, Red Hat]

    With the meteoric rise of microservices and the rush to build more applications more quickly, APIs are being used more than ever to connect services and transfer data. But with a growing number of smaller application "pieces" trying to communicate with each other, APIs (your own and those from third parties) are becoming increasingly challenging to secure.

  • Red Hat Launches Remote Certification Exams
  • A deep dive into Keycloak

    DevNation Tech Talks are hosted by the Red Hat technologists who create our products. These sessions include real solutions plus code and sample projects to help you get started. In this talk, you’ll learn about Keycloak from Stian Thorgersen and Burr Sutter. Keycloak is an open source identity and access management solution for modern applications and services. You might already be familiar with it and are curious about its capabilities and features, but if you aren’t, don’t worry. In this video tutorial, we’ll give you a great introduction to Keycloak and go through most of the capabilities and features that help you secure your applications and services. You’ll discover how to easily enable two-factor authentication, integrate with external user stores like LDAP, delegate authentication to other identity providers, and use many more of the other cool and useful features Keycloak brings to the table.

  • Kubernetes is the future: But what does this future look like?

    When industry influencers and CIOs talk about the future of computing, they typically aren’t only discussing hardware advancements or cloud-based software. Increasingly, these conversations center on transformation through application innovation, providing new predictive services to customers that are driven by an integrated user experience. This could be something like inspecting customer data patterns to promote new banking services, analyzing health indicators to proactively recommend treatment or an immersive interface for personalized interactions. Whatever the end product, it’s about gaining a competitive advantage in an ever-evolving, highly-competitive marketplace through technological advancement. Enter containers. Containers enable these applications to evolve faster, increase developer velocity and bring a greater level of portability and consistency regardless of underlying infrastructure. Gartner predicts that, by 2022, more than 75% of global organizations will be running containerized applications in production, which is a significant increase from fewer than 30% in 2019.1

  • Fedora 33 To Offer Stratis 2.1 For Per-Pool Encryption

    While Fedora 33 is slated to default to the Btrfs file-system for desktop spins, for those on Fedora Server 33 or otherwise not using the defaults will have Stratis Storage 2.1 as another option. Red Hat's Stratis Storage has been their effort to improve the Linux storage stack while building upon LVM, Device Mapper, and XFS for offering ZFS/Btrfs-like features. Stratis continues making great progress and is ultimately committed to by Red Hat as part of their Linux storage play, potentially with it being used by default come Red Hat Enterprise Linux 9. Meanwhile the Fedora community has been dabbling with Btrfs on the desktop side for Fedora 33 and thankfully both technologies continue to be fostered by Fedora.

  • Document APIs with open source OpenAPI Comment Parser

    Whether you’re building an application or website, great documentation is crucial to the success of your service. Developers need instructions on how to use your API and they need a way to try it out. Good documentation handles both. The OpenAPI Specification is an open standard for defining and documenting your API. The OpenAPI Specification enables the generation of great documentation, but creating an OpenAPI spec takes a lot of time and effort to create and keep up-to-date. Often, the OpenAPI spec ends up a large, forgotten, thousandl-ine file. To help make it as easy as possible to document an API, today we are launching the OpenAPI Comment Parser. The goal of OpenAPI Comment Parser is to give developers a way to generate this OpenAPI spec from comments inline with their code. When the OpenAPI spec lives inside the code, developers are much more likely to keep it up-to-date as their code changes.

  • Total cost of ownership: The hidden part of the iceberg

    It seems like these days, everyone is talking about Containers, Kubernetes, microservices, serverless, cloud-native computing, and the Journey to Cloud or multicloud. These key technologies have many advantages, but you should be aware of some of the hidden costs associated with moving to the cloud so that you can plan in advance and avoid any surprises along the way.

  • Cockpit 225 and Cockpit Podman 21

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from Cockpit version 223 and Cockpit Podman version 21. [...] When a virtual machine is not running and Cockpit makes a snapshot, only the disk contents will be saved. When a virtual machine is running, Cockpit will snapshot both the disk and memory state.