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November 2010

2010's 5 Biggest Linux and open-source stories

Filed under
Linux
OSS

blogs.computerworld: The story behind the story is that Linux has become totally mainstream. No, you may not have a Linux desktop in front of you the way I do, but you if you spend most of your day visiting Google, Facebook, and Twitter, you're using Linux. Still don't believe me? Look at the numbers and my first story of the year:

6 Best Linux Terminal Applications

Filed under
Software

tuxarena.blogspot: Guake - Quake-style terminal for GNOME
A Quake-style terminal is a drop-down terminal which can be shown/hidden just like the console in Quake.

Fedora Project announces election results

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: In a post on the project's mailing list, Fedora Project Leader Jared K. Smith has announced the election results for the Fedora Ambassadors Steering Committee (FAmSCo), the Fedora Engineering Steering Committee (FESCo), and the Fedora Board.

The (open)Fate of openSUSE

Filed under
SUSE

ostatic.com: Now that it is believed that openSUSE will survive the latest complicated Novell dealings, developers and users are moving ahead to improve the next releases. Version 11.4 is due March 10, 2011 and openFATE is playing a significant role.

Red Hat At $1 Billion

Filed under
Linux

forbes.com: Based on the run rates of the current quarter, Red Hat will likely reach $1 billion in annual revenue in 2011. Only a handful of companies, probably less than 20 software firms, have ever hit this milestone.

Also: Red Hat Buys Makara, Adds PaaS to Its Cloud Mix

The Top 5 Linux-esque Geek mods

Filed under
Linux
Software

web2linux.com: 1. Fortune in your command line. Any self respecting Linux geek should add fortune to bashrc, so everytime you boot up a terminal a Mark Twain pearl of wisdom greets you.

How to Buy a Ubuntu Computer

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu
  • How to Buy a Computer Preloaded With Ubuntu
  • Lean & Mean Dell Vostro V130 For Ubuntu Users
  • On Dell PCs, Ubuntu Plus Windows Could Be A Winning Combo

Meet Synapse

Filed under
Software
  • Meet Synapse – the super fast new GNOME Do replacement
  • Syanpse Is Here: New Launcher with Zeitgeist

Blender: No Maya. No RAM.

Filed under
Software

linuxforu.com: Cut to the 21st century. Ram has aged gracefully. He looks more muscular and more global: a blend between American comic super-heroes, Japanese manga characters, and Amar Chitra Katha gods.

Gaming on GNU/Linux: Ryzom MMORPG Goes Native

Filed under
Gaming

dev.ryzom.com (PR): Winch Gate Properties Ltd has announced the release of the official native GNU/Linux client for the massively-multiplayer online science-fantasy role playing game, Ryzom. To celebrate the release Ryzom is hosting an in-game contest with a grand prize of a ZaReason Terra-HD Netbook.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

  • How to install go1.19beta on Ubuntu 22.04 – NextGenTips

    In this tutorial, we are going to explore how to install go on Ubuntu 22.04 Golang is an open-source programming language that is easy to learn and use. It is built-in concurrency and has a robust standard library. It is reliable, builds fast, and efficient software that scales fast. Its concurrency mechanisms make it easy to write programs that get the most out of multicore and networked machines, while its novel-type systems enable flexible and modular program constructions. Go compiles quickly to machine code and has the convenience of garbage collection and the power of run-time reflection. In this guide, we are going to learn how to install golang 1.19beta on Ubuntu 22.04. Go 1.19beta1 is not yet released. There is so much work in progress with all the documentation.

  • molecule test: failed to connect to bus in systemd container - openQA bites

    Ansible Molecule is a project to help you test your ansible roles. I’m using molecule for automatically testing the ansible roles of geekoops.

  • How To Install MongoDB on AlmaLinux 9 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install MongoDB on AlmaLinux 9. For those of you who didn’t know, MongoDB is a high-performance, highly scalable document-oriented NoSQL database. Unlike in SQL databases where data is stored in rows and columns inside tables, in MongoDB, data is structured in JSON-like format inside records which are referred to as documents. The open-source attribute of MongoDB as a database software makes it an ideal candidate for almost any database-related project. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you the step-by-step installation of the MongoDB NoSQL database on AlmaLinux 9. You can follow the same instructions for CentOS and Rocky Linux.

  • An introduction (and how-to) to Plugin Loader for the Steam Deck. - Invidious
  • Self-host a Ghost Blog With Traefik

    Ghost is a very popular open-source content management system. Started as an alternative to WordPress and it went on to become an alternative to Substack by focusing on membership and newsletter. The creators of Ghost offer managed Pro hosting but it may not fit everyone's budget. Alternatively, you can self-host it on your own cloud servers. On Linux handbook, we already have a guide on deploying Ghost with Docker in a reverse proxy setup. Instead of Ngnix reverse proxy, you can also use another software called Traefik with Docker. It is a popular open-source cloud-native application proxy, API Gateway, Edge-router, and more. I use Traefik to secure my websites using an SSL certificate obtained from Let's Encrypt. Once deployed, Traefik can automatically manage your certificates and their renewals. In this tutorial, I'll share the necessary steps for deploying a Ghost blog with Docker and Traefik.

Red Hat Hires a Blind Software Engineer to Improve Accessibility on Linux Desktop

Accessibility on a Linux desktop is not one of the strongest points to highlight. However, GNOME, one of the best desktop environments, has managed to do better comparatively (I think). In a blog post by Christian Fredrik Schaller (Director for Desktop/Graphics, Red Hat), he mentions that they are making serious efforts to improve accessibility. Starting with Red Hat hiring Lukas Tyrychtr, who is a blind software engineer to lead the effort in improving Red Hat Enterprise Linux, and Fedora Workstation in terms of accessibility. Read more

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