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November 2011

*A Cow based Economics Lesson;

Filed under
Humor

SOCIALISM
You have 2 cows.
You give one to your neighbor.

COMMUNISM
You have 2 cows.
The State takes both and gives you some milk.

FASCISM
You have 2 cows.
The State takes both and sells you some milk.

There are more...

We are so small

Filed under
Just talk

While you are sitting there wondering the plight of Ubuntu or if Gnome 3 is worse than KDE4.. take a look at this post, it sort of all falls into perspective..

Find out more...

Sometimes Wine Relaxes Linux, Sometimes It Just Causes Headaches

Filed under
Software

linuxinsider.com: A little Wine with your Linux computing session can keep you using your favorite Microsoft (Nasdaq: MSFT) Windows programs.

Vector Linux 7.0 GOLD Released

Filed under
Linux

zdnet.co.uk: With all the excitement and discussion surrounding the recent release of Linux Mint 12 (and Fedora 16, and openSuSE 12.1), it is easy to overlook the smaller Linux distributions. Vector Linux is a good example of this, with their recently announced 7.0 distribution.

openSUSE 12.1 (GNOME) Review

Filed under
SUSE

duskfire.wordpress: The last time I used openSUSE was about 2 years ago (edition 11.2) and I wasn’t impressed enough to keep using it. But J.A. Watson of ZDNet.co.uk told me this new edition is much improved, so I decided to check it out.

Sorting out Red Hat Linux based distributions

Filed under
Linux

zdnet.co.uk: I wanted to take a moment and touch on Fedora and the Red Hat based distributions to distinguish the differences among them. I am a huge fan of the Red Hat based distributions. So what is the difference between them?

Taking Screenshots with Shutter in Ubuntu

Filed under
Reviews

For those of you who didn’t hear about it before, it’s probably time you have a look at it. Shutter is probably the most powerful screenshot-taking application available for GNOME, including countless features and several useful tools to take screenshots and manipulate them in any way possible.

Debian Sid+ gets KDE 4.7.2: install instructions

Filed under
KDE

After months of idling at KDE 4.6.5, the Debian-KDE team has made 4.7.2 available in the Experimental repositories. You need to be running a fully-updated Debian Sid to successfully install these packages, and be willing to experience possibly more breakage than Debian Sid itself provides.

http://gnuski.blogspot.com/2011/11/debian-sid-gets-kde-472-install.html

IM from the Terminal: 2 Great Applications

Filed under
Reviews

This article is about two popular IM (Instant Messaging) clients that can be used in a terminal instead of a graphical environment. Both have advanced features and are based on the ncurses library.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • AMD's Paying For Some Open-Source OpenCL Love
  • Shutter 0.88 Screenshot Tool Released
  • Mandriva Introduces New Media Player
  • Should Tablets and Smartphones be Considered "PCs"?
  • Changing umask
  • Ensure High Availability with CentOS 6 Clustering
  • Dungeons of Dredmor and Introversion source code added to Bundle!
  • IT: Sicily to consider law promoting the use of open source
  • How to Modify the Path Variable in Linux/Unix
  • Fed up of re-opening your ssh sessions after suspend?
  • The Advantages of Using Linux

More in Tux Machines

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Miscellany

  • Nominations open for 2021 Red Hat Innovation Awards

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that it is accepting nominations for the 2021 Red Hat Innovation Awards. Since 2007, the Red Hat Innovation Awards have recognized organizations from around the world and across industries for the transformative projects and outstanding results they have experienced with Red Hat's open source solutions. Open source has helped transform technology from the datacenter to the cloud and the Red Hat Innovation Awards showcase its transformative impact in organizations around the world.

  • Red Hat Virtualization 4.4 brings new features for managing virtual machines

    Red Hat today introduced a new version of its virtualization platform, Red Hat Virtualization 4.4, that will help customers more easily manage their applications and give its hybrid cloud strategy a boost in the process. Red Hat Virtualization is an alternative to VMware Inc.’s vSphere. The platform runs on the IBM Corp. subsidiary’s widely used enterprise Linux distribution, RHEL, and provides features for managing large fleets of virtualized applications. Red Hat Virtualization 4.4 has been updated with support for the latest release of RHEL that Red Hat launched in April. That release, officially RHEL 8.2, introduced performance improvements as well as monitoring features that make it easier to identify security and reliability issues. Red Hat Virtualization customers can now take advantage of those enhancements by upgrading the operating system installations in their deployments.

  • Critical API security risks: 10 best practices [Ed: By Security Evangelist and Strategist, Red Hat]

    With the meteoric rise of microservices and the rush to build more applications more quickly, APIs are being used more than ever to connect services and transfer data. But with a growing number of smaller application "pieces" trying to communicate with each other, APIs (your own and those from third parties) are becoming increasingly challenging to secure.

  • Red Hat Launches Remote Certification Exams
  • A deep dive into Keycloak

    DevNation Tech Talks are hosted by the Red Hat technologists who create our products. These sessions include real solutions plus code and sample projects to help you get started. In this talk, you’ll learn about Keycloak from Stian Thorgersen and Burr Sutter. Keycloak is an open source identity and access management solution for modern applications and services. You might already be familiar with it and are curious about its capabilities and features, but if you aren’t, don’t worry. In this video tutorial, we’ll give you a great introduction to Keycloak and go through most of the capabilities and features that help you secure your applications and services. You’ll discover how to easily enable two-factor authentication, integrate with external user stores like LDAP, delegate authentication to other identity providers, and use many more of the other cool and useful features Keycloak brings to the table.

  • Kubernetes is the future: But what does this future look like?

    When industry influencers and CIOs talk about the future of computing, they typically aren’t only discussing hardware advancements or cloud-based software. Increasingly, these conversations center on transformation through application innovation, providing new predictive services to customers that are driven by an integrated user experience. This could be something like inspecting customer data patterns to promote new banking services, analyzing health indicators to proactively recommend treatment or an immersive interface for personalized interactions. Whatever the end product, it’s about gaining a competitive advantage in an ever-evolving, highly-competitive marketplace through technological advancement. Enter containers. Containers enable these applications to evolve faster, increase developer velocity and bring a greater level of portability and consistency regardless of underlying infrastructure. Gartner predicts that, by 2022, more than 75% of global organizations will be running containerized applications in production, which is a significant increase from fewer than 30% in 2019.1

  • Fedora 33 To Offer Stratis 2.1 For Per-Pool Encryption

    While Fedora 33 is slated to default to the Btrfs file-system for desktop spins, for those on Fedora Server 33 or otherwise not using the defaults will have Stratis Storage 2.1 as another option. Red Hat's Stratis Storage has been their effort to improve the Linux storage stack while building upon LVM, Device Mapper, and XFS for offering ZFS/Btrfs-like features. Stratis continues making great progress and is ultimately committed to by Red Hat as part of their Linux storage play, potentially with it being used by default come Red Hat Enterprise Linux 9. Meanwhile the Fedora community has been dabbling with Btrfs on the desktop side for Fedora 33 and thankfully both technologies continue to be fostered by Fedora.

  • Document APIs with open source OpenAPI Comment Parser

    Whether you’re building an application or website, great documentation is crucial to the success of your service. Developers need instructions on how to use your API and they need a way to try it out. Good documentation handles both. The OpenAPI Specification is an open standard for defining and documenting your API. The OpenAPI Specification enables the generation of great documentation, but creating an OpenAPI spec takes a lot of time and effort to create and keep up-to-date. Often, the OpenAPI spec ends up a large, forgotten, thousandl-ine file. To help make it as easy as possible to document an API, today we are launching the OpenAPI Comment Parser. The goal of OpenAPI Comment Parser is to give developers a way to generate this OpenAPI spec from comments inline with their code. When the OpenAPI spec lives inside the code, developers are much more likely to keep it up-to-date as their code changes.

  • Total cost of ownership: The hidden part of the iceberg

    It seems like these days, everyone is talking about Containers, Kubernetes, microservices, serverless, cloud-native computing, and the Journey to Cloud or multicloud. These key technologies have many advantages, but you should be aware of some of the hidden costs associated with moving to the cloud so that you can plan in advance and avoid any surprises along the way.

  • Cockpit 225 and Cockpit Podman 21

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from Cockpit version 223 and Cockpit Podman version 21. [...] When a virtual machine is not running and Cockpit makes a snapshot, only the disk contents will be saved. When a virtual machine is running, Cockpit will snapshot both the disk and memory state.

Linuxizing the Office: An Interview with The Mad Botter

Honestly, it was macOS Catalina. We were having too many problems with people updating OS X and breaking Homebrew packages, to the point where we had to reinstall our custom toolchain every time we updated. The last guy on Mac updated to Catalina recently, and he had to struggle with Excel libraries because Apple moves things between OS versions. It just wasn’t worth it. I’ve been talking about it for about a year with my CTO. All of our back-end service runs Ubuntu. Most of the client-side work we’re doing is for IOT devices, and that’s all Linux. We ended up basically having an expensive machine so that we could emulate Linux on anything. It didn’t make a lot of sense to keep using Mac, so we switched. How was the transition from macOS to Linux? Actually super easy! Once we wrote a few setup scripts and packages we needed for different jobs in our pipeline, we were up and running. We already had a bunch of scripting and automations for the servers we had, and they’re all on Ubuntu, so it’s not a big jump in terms of the command line. How did you find the overall experience on Pop!_OS 20.04? I found it pretty intuitive. Learning the keyboard shortcuts took about a week. I really don’t have any issues. I like the tiling, I use that every day. It definitely makes it easier to multitask on a laptop screen. Read more Also: Reader’s Choice: Here’s Pop!_OS running on a Chromebook

Android Leftovers

Security: Patches, L1TF/Foreshadow, PE Tree, IPFire and BootHole

  • Security updates for Thursday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (clamav and json-c), Fedora (python2, python36, and python37), Red Hat (thunderbird), Scientific Linux (thunderbird), SUSE (java-11-openjdk, kernel, rubygem-actionview-4_2, wireshark, xen, and xrdp), and Ubuntu (openjdk-8 and ppp). 

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  • Researchers Make More Discoveries Around L1TF/Foreshadow - It's Not Good

    Security researchers from Graz University of Technology and CISPA Helmholtz are out with their latest findings on CPU speculative execution vulnerabilities, namely taking another look at L1TF/Foreshadow. Their findings are bad news not only for Intel but potentially other CPU vendors as well. [...] The new vulnerability outlined in the paper is "Dereference Trap" for leaking registers from an SGX enclave in the presence of only a speculative register dereference.  The discovery of speculative dereferencing of a user-space register in the kernel as opposed to the prefetcher not only means that some mitigations may be inadequate, but they can improve the performance of the original attack and reportedly produce similar behavior on non-Intel CPUs. 

  • PE Tree: Free open source tool for reverse-engineering PE files

    PE Tree allows malware analysts to view Portable Executable (PE) files in a tree-view using pefile – a multi-platform Python module that parses and works with PE files – and PyQt5, a module that can be used to create graphical user interfaces. “PE Tree is developed in Python and supports the Windows, Linux and Mac operating systems. It can be installed and run as either a standalone application or an IDAPython plugin,” Tom Bonner, a threat researcher at BlackBerry, explained.

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  • IPFire: A new location database for the Internet

    In the last couple of months, we, the IPFire development team, have launched a small side project: A new location database for the Internet. In this article, I would like to give you a brief background story on why and how it come to this... [...] Other applications would be threat prevention like we use it in IPFire. Connection attempts from certain countries can simply be blocked, or port forwardings can be limited to certain countries only. That is, however, not an exact science. The Internet changes constantly. IP address ranges are re-assigned from one party to another one, and often it can take some time until those location databases are all updated. Up to that point, you will see wrong information like the Google front page being shown in a wrong language. This might only be a bit of an inconvenience, but for a firewall, we need more recent and reliable data.

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  • What to do about the BootHole vulnerability

    Late last month, security researchers discovered a major vulnerability in the software that controls how PCs boot their operating systems. This is one of those issues that sounds scarier than it is. Fixing it will be a major process, especially for Linux system administrators and corporate IT organizations with a mixture of different PC vintages and manufacturers. The problem has been named BootHole, and it could affect up to a billion computers.