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April 2012

Sabayon Linux – Stable if not without polish

Filed under
Linux

thelinuxexperiment.com: I have been running Sabayon Linux (Xfce) for the past couple of months and figured I would throw a post up on here describing my experience with it.

Libre Office is taking off 'like a rocket'

Filed under
LibO
Interviews

techradar.com: Michael Meeks is a long-time OpenOffice, now Libre Office, contributor and employee of Novell, now Attachmate. We caught up with him to get the inside perspective on the massive changes they, and desktop Linux as a whole, have gone through in the past few years.

Ubuntu 12.04 LTS - Scorecard

Filed under
Ubuntu

zdnet.co.uk: Well, you can't swing a dead cat without hitting an Ubuntu 12.04 review, with pictures, videos, step-by-step instructions and everything else imaginable. So rather than write yet another, I am going to take a different approach -

Free as in awesome: our favorite open source apps for Ubuntu 12.04

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: In this short roundup, I’ll look at some great third-party applications that you can get from the Software Center to augment your Ubuntu installation.

Try 'Precise Tweak' to Customize Ubuntu Linux 12.04

Filed under
Software
Ubuntu

pcworld.com: Customizability has always been one of Linux's best defining features, and the newly released Ubuntu Linux 12.04 “Precise Pangolin” is no exception.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 454

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: The new Calligra office suite
  • News: Ubuntu's "Quantal Quetzal", interviews with Jane Silber, Jono Bacon and Artyom Zorin, whither Mandriva, upgrading to Fedora 17, Haiku overview
  • Questions and answers: Using native applications, a note on OpenSSH
  • Released last week: Ubuntu 12.04, Linux Mint 201204 "Debian"

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Xfce 4.10 comes with more panel modes and new application finder

Filed under
Software

h-online.com: The developers of the Xfce desktop environment have released the newest version of their suite of applications. Xfce 4.10 was released roughly fifteen months after its stable predecessor Xfce 4.8.

Why Linux is a desktop flop

Filed under
Linux

networkworld.com: It's free, easier to use than ever, IT staffers know it and love it, and it has fewer viruses and Trojans than Windows. It's already ubiquitous on the server side. Plus, there are now alternatives to the most popular software packages out there. So, why hasn't Linux on the desktop taken off?

Is Apache overextending itself as rivals devour its core web server share?

Filed under
Software

zdnet.com: Has the Apache Software Foundation overextended itself by taking open source projects like OpenOffice and Cloudstack off the hands of proprietary giants while its famed HTTP web server continues losing ground to NGINX?

Ubuntu 12.04 Wins Me Back

Filed under
Ubuntu

datamation.com: Over the years I've found myself having a love/hate relationship with Ubuntu. But then came Ubuntu 12.04.

More in Tux Machines

Microsoft Against GNU/Linux in the Public Sector

  • NHS: Thanks for all the free work, Linux nerds, now face our trademark cops [Ed: NHS has long been a Microsoft stronghold]
    Dev team quits, suggests NHS used them to get better deal with Microsoft [...] The small team behind an ambitious NHoS Linux project are calling it a day, citing receipt of a trademark infringement warning from the Department of Health's (DoH) "brand police" as the "final straw". The initial raison d’être of NHoS was to identify a way to roll out NHSbuntu, a strand of open-source Linux distro Ubuntu designed for the NHS, on three-quarters of a million smartcards. The smartcards are used to verify the healthcare pros that access 80 per cent of applications on millions of NHS PCs. The volunteer force behind NHoS wanted NHSbuntu to replace the current smartcard verification system that was running on Windows, and ultimately, have the operating system replace Windows on the desktop as well. Smart card recognition was seen as a mile-high hurdle in this grand plan. [...] Baw alleged the pair "(unbeknown to us) were also duplicitously negotiating with Microsoft about a new NHS Enterprise Wide Agreement".
  • Barcelona Council abandons Microsoft for open-source software [iophk: "again, disinfo about the reason for Munich's change"
    The Spanish city of Barcelona has announced it will phase out its use of Microsoft software in favour of open-source alternatives. Over the next few years, the city will transition away from Microsoft's services to guarantee its "technical sovereignty."

Android Leftovers

How to create outlines in Linux with TreeLine

As someone who's been known to string a few words together, I know that a well-crafted outline can be a key part of any writing project. Why? A good outline helps you organize your work. It provides a structure for what you're writing as well as a roadmap from beginning to end. Outlines aren't just for writing, either. They can be a great tool for organizing just about any kind of project. Read more

Debian and Ubuntu: gLinux, arm64, GNOME and Ubucon Europe

  • Google Developing New Debian-Based Linux For Internal Use
    Web giant Google announced at the DebConf17 Linux conference that it will be changing over to a Debian-based distribution of GNU/Linux internally, known as gLinux. One of the key developers involved with Google’s internal specialized Linux distribution efforts took the stage to make the announcement. It’s worth noting that this team member formerly worked for Canonical, the team behind the popular Ubuntu distribution. That is because Google is dumping Ubuntu as its base and moving to Debian, the distribution that Ubuntu is forked from. The move will be gradual; some of Google’s most mission-critical computers, including desktops, laptops, and servers, currently run on Goobuntu, and it will take time to develop gLinux and deploy it across Google’s internal Linux fleet.
  • Google Replaces Its Ubuntu-Based Goobuntu Linux OS with Debian-Based gLinux
    After more than five years of using its in-house built Ubuntu-based Goobuntu Linux distribution internally for various things, Google has decided to replace it with a gLinux, based on Debian Testing. It's no secret that Google users Linux a lot. It's Android and Chrome OS operating systems are powered by Linux, so they need to use a GNU/Linux distro to work on its other OSes for laptops and mobile phones. Until now, the company used Goobuntu Linux, which was based on Canonical's very popular Ubuntu Linux operating system.
  • First steps with arm64
    As it was Christmas time recently, I wanted to allow oneself something special. So I ordered a Macchiatobin from SolidRun. Unfortunately they don’t exaggerate with their delivery times and I had to wait about two months for my device. I couldn’t celebrate Christmas time with it, but fortunately New Year. Anyway, first I tried to use the included U-Boot to start the Debian installer on an USB stick. Oh boy, that was a bad idea and in retrospect just a waste of time. But there is debian-arm@l.d.o and Steve McIntyre was so kind to help me out of my vale of tears.
  • Why Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Will Use an Older Version of Nautilus
    Ubuntu devs have decided to release Ubuntu 18.04 LTS with Nautilus 3.26 installed so that users are able to put icons on the desktop. GNOME removed the option to put icons on the desktop earlier this month. The next release of the file manager, the app which has hitherto handled the job of drawing and managing the ‘desktop’ space, will no longer support this feature.
  • Ubucon Europe: 100 Days to go!