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December 2012

Five Linux predictions for 2013

Filed under
Linux

pcworld.com: Now that the final curtain is about to drop on the year that was 2012, there's no better time to look ahead and try to anticipate what 2013 will bring.

Mozilla Firefox in 2012

Filed under
Moz/FF

internetnews.com: 2012 was one of the busiest year's ever for the Mozilla's Firefox project. This is the first full year for Mozilla's rapid release cycle which debuted in 2011.

Aakash 3 May Feature SIM Slot, Linux Support

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets
  • Aakash 3 May Feature SIM Slot, Linux Support
  • Samsung And DoCoMo Reportedly Team Up To Offer Tizen Smartphones In 2013

Five Biggest Open Source Developments in 2012

Filed under
OSS
  • Five Biggest Open Source Developments in 2012
  • Tech Jobs In 2013: Open Source All The Way Down
  • European Commission's Low Attack on Open Source

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Avoid headaches and eye strain with the right tools
  • Firefox in Debian?
  • No, Linux won't be easy to run on a Microsoft Surface
  • GTK+ Healthcheck
  • Announcing the Vim Beginners’ Site
  • TLWIR 51: Coreboot: the Solution to the Secure Boot Fiasco
  • A week with Mint Nadia XFCE
  • Some wallpapers I made
  • 2013 Linux Predictions | LAS | s25e01
  • Shopping lens for Gnome Shell
  • Private windows coming to Firefox
  • rekonq 2.0 first stable
  • 14 Years & Kicking: FreeDOS Is Still Alive
  • Most Popular Linux Hardware Of 2012
  • Linux Outlaws 292

Dual boot with two Linux distributions

Filed under
HowTos
  • Dual boot with two Linux distributions
  • Selecting different keyboard layouts in Xfce
  • Display Comic Book (.CBR/.CBZ) thumbnails in KDE Dolphin
  • How to Rebuild Nvidia Driver's Kernel Module
  • Build extensions for the GNOME desktop environment

The Problems Right Now For Gaming On Linux

Filed under
Gaming
  • The Problems Right Now For Gaming On Linux
  • l’Abbaye Des Morts GNU/Linux Port – Released
  • [Game Review] Team Fortress 2
  • Faster Than Light Is Now 25% Cheaper on Steam for Linux
  • Red Orchestra 2 coming to Linux?

What on Earth is Gnome OS?

Filed under
OS
Software

techradar.com: The buzzword at the moment definitely seems to be "platform", and the Gnome team aren't happy just writing a bunch of libraries and programs sitting on top of a base system that they don't control. More specifically, they're looking to have more control over the whole experience for Gnome users.

Best KDE Distro of 2012

Filed under
KDE
Linux

mylinuxexplore.blogspot: KDE has always intrigued me a lot, though I never started using it on daily basis for production purposes. It is really user-friendly, plasma interface looks awesome, effects are subtle and KDE 4.9.* is quite stable with loads of KDE specific applications. Almost every popular distro now has a KDE edition for the users, an evidence of the growing popularity of KDE.

The year GNOMES, Ubuntu sufferers forked off to Mint Linux

Filed under
Linux
Software
Ubuntu

theregister.co.uk: It's been a rough year for Linux on the desktop. More specifically, it's been a rough year for GNOME-based Linux on the desktop. But a glimmer of hope may have appeared thanks to a Mint-flavoured distribution of the open-source operating system.

More in Tux Machines

Linux Kernel News

  • Linux: Why do people hate systemd?
    systemd has caused an almost unending amount of controversy in the Linux community. Some Linux users have been unyielding in their opposition to systemd, while others have been much more accepting. The topic of systemd came up in a recent thread in the Linux subreddit and the folks there did not pull any punches when sharing their thoughts about it.
  • PulseAudio 10.0 Linux Sound System Released, Offers OpenSSL 1.1.0 Compatibility
    Today, January 19, 2017, sees the official release of the PulseAudio 10.0 open-source sound server for Linux-based operating systems, a major version that introduces many exciting new features. PulseAudio 10.0 has been in development for the past seven months, since the June 22, 2016, release of PulseAudio 9.0, which is currently used by default in numerous GNU/Linux distributions.
  • Linux is part of the IoT security problem, dev tells Linux conference
    The Mirai botnet? Just the “tip of the iceberg” is how security bods at this week's linux.conf.au see the Internet of Things. Presenting to the Security and Privacy miniconf at linux.conf.au, embedded systems developer and consultant Christopher Biggs pointed out that Mirai's focus on building a big DDoS cannon drew attention away from the other risks posed by insecure cameras and digital video recorders.
  • The Linux Foundation Brings 3 New Open Source Events to China
    LinuxCon, ContainerCon, and CloudOpen will be held in China this year for the first time, The Linux Foundation announced this week. After the success of other Linux Foundation events in the country, including MesosCon Asia and Cloud Foundry Summit Asia, The Linux Foundation decided to offer its flagship LinuxCon, ContainerCon and CloudOpen events in China as well, said Linux Foundation Executive Director Jim Zemlin. “Chinese developers and businesses have strongly embraced open source and are contributing significant amounts of code to a wide variety of projects,” Zemlin said. “We have heard the call to bring more open source events to China.”

Dell Has Sold ‘Tens of Millions’ Dollars’ Worth of Linux Laptops

So popular Linux personality Bryan Lunduke, who recently took an hour out to talk to Dell’s Senior Architect in the office of CTO — try saying that with a mouthful of doughnut — Barton George. What did he learn? Well, for one, Dell says it has ‘no plans’ to start shipping its Linux-powered developer laptops with anything other than Ubuntu. Read more

Open-source voting is the answer to hacking concerns

Will we ever have a voting system that is completely error-proof and impenetrable from malicious forces? Not likely. But the security breaches that are increasingly a part of daily life serve as a call to action. Every day brings a new report of hacking or suspicious activity, and increasingly with fingers pointing to international actors. Whether it is statewide voter registration databases (Illinois and Arizona; some say more); national party organizations (the Democratic National Committee); utilities (Vermont’s Burlington Electric); or Russia’s state-run television station (RT) suddenly interrupting C-SPAN last week — the incident is still under investigation and not confirmed as a hack — it is all very unsettling and leaves us feeling vulnerable. Read more

The Many, the Humble, the Ubuntu Users

I have never been much of a leading-edge computing person. In fact, I first got mildly famous online writing a weekly column titled “This Old PC” for Time/Life about making do with used gear — often by installing Linux on it — and after that an essentially identical column for Andover.net titled “Cheap Computing,” which was also about saving money in a world where most online computing columns seemed to be about getting you to spend until you had no money left to spend on food. Read more