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January 2013

5 Ubuntu alternatives worth checking out

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Linux So while Ubuntu is generally a good choice, it might not be exactly what you need. There are many other options out there that are worth knowing about.

Have some fun with Deepin 12.12 alpha

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Linux Linux Deepin is one of my favorite desktop distributions. A Chinese distro that is based on Ubuntu Desktop, it is not just a rebranded Ubuntu desktop, but offers a desktop computing experience different from that of its parent distribution.

Protection against Samsung UEFI bug merged into Linux kernel

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Linux On Thursday morning, Linus Torvalds merged two changes into the main Linux development tree which mean that the samsung-laptop kernel driver will no longer be activated when Linux is booted via UEFI (1, 2). This should resolve the problem of some Samsung laptops being irreparably damaged when Linux is booted using UEFI.

Defence bets big on Linux

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Linux Defence will shift about 400 more IT systems to Linux-based servers in the coming months as it nears completion of a decade-long upgrade of its radar surveillance systems.

10 open source projects to watch this year

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Software Following up on last year's list, Black Duck released its “2012 Open Source Rookies of the Year” on Wednesday, highlighting 10 key up-and-comers worth watching over the coming year. Here are 10 projects to keep an eye on:

VLC Multimedia Player Shows Changing Open Source License Is Hard, But Possible

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OSS Licenses lie at the heart of open source -- and many other kinds of "open" too. That's because they are used to define the rights of users, and to ensure those rights are passed on -- that the intellectual commons is not enclosed. Their central importance explains in part the flamewars that erupt periodically over which license is "best."

some leftovers:

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  • Picking up Aaron Swartz's dropped flags
  • New Secure Boot Patches Break Hibernate, Kexec Support
  • the real wikipedia of maps
  • Fedora 18 Gnome 3.6 Desktop Review
  • Kororaa 18 beta progressing well, final touches
  • Interview Google Open Source Program Manager Chris DiBona
  • Which open source software license should I use?
  • Linux Foundation Announces New Members
  • Time to drop flash
  • Tutorial 1: Hello Elementary
  • Bootstrappable Debian - New Milestone
  • No, that “Most Trusted Company for Privacy Award” does not compute
  • XBMC 12 open source media centre adds Live TV and Android support
  • Python for Kids helps adults teach programming to youth
  • Improve KDE4 Performance: Disable Nepomuk and Akonadi
  • Fedora To Look At Reviving Apache OpenOffice
  • Manokwari Desktop on openSUSE 12.2
  • How to connect to remote server via SSH using Dolphin
  • Microsoft Cradles Linus Torvalds’ (Other) Baby

Plasma Active 4

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  • Plasma Active 4
  • desktop containment moving to plasma quick
  • ktouch fun

LibreOffice 3.6.5 Finishes off 3.6

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LibO Today The Document Foundation announced the release of their final 3.6 update, LibreOffice 3.6.5. "This new release is another step forward in the process of improving the overall quality and stability of LibreOffice, and facilitating the migration process to free software."

Why I contribute my changes to Libreoffice and won’t re-license

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mmohrhard.wordpress: So after reading several times on another mailing list that Libreoffice developers should relicense their patches to make them available to other descendents in the ecosystem I’m explaining why I contribute to the Libreoffice project and license my changes only as LGPLv3+/MPL.

More in Tux Machines

Unicode 8.0 Support Added To GNOME's GLib

Within the latest development code of GNOME's key GLib library leading up to GNOME 3.20 is Unicode 8.0 support. Unicode 8.0 as released back in June adds 7,716 characters with six new scripts, many new symbols, and various character additions. Per this commit today by Red Hat's Matthias Clasen, GLib's Unicode support has been updated to version 8.0. Clasen wrote, "Regenerate data tables from the Unicode Character Database, add new scripts, and update tests to include some of the new data." Read more

Huawei Watch Review: Best Android Wear Smartwatch Available

The Huawei Watch currently offers the best option on the Android Wear platform. The Huawei Watch looks elegant and offers great design as well as multiple attractive style options depending on the buyer’s cash flow. Even iPhone owners can take a look. If an iPhone owner prefers a stainless steel round watch, then the Huawei Watch is a usable option at a lower price than the Stainless Steel Apple Watch. Android Wear works well on iPhone, but does not give users the same level of integration. The most important features work fine, including notifications and fitness tracking. We give the Huawei Watch a hearty recommendation. It is worth paying a little more for this attractive and well-designed Android Wear smartwatch. Read more

Linux Kernel 4.1.10 LTS Is Now Available for Download with Networking Fixes

After announcing the release of the Linux 4.2.3 kernel, Greg Kroah-Hartman has informed the world today, October 3, about the release and immediate availability for download of the tenth maintenance version of the Linux 4.1 LTS kernel series. Read more Also: Linux 4.3-rc4 Kernel Released: Adds A New & Better String Copy Function Linus Torvalds Announces Linux Kernel 4.3 RC4 on the Eve of the Project's 24th Birthday

How Debian managed the systemd transition

Debian's decision to move to systemd as the default init system was a famously contentious (and rather public) debate. Once all the chaos regarding the decision itself had died down, however, it was left to project members to implement the change. At DebConf 2015 in Heidelberg, Martin Pitt and Michael Biebl gave a down-to-earth talk about how that implementation work had gone and what was still ahead. Pitt and Biebl are the current maintainers of the systemd package in Debian, with Pitt also maintaining the corresponding Ubuntu package. The pair began with a brief recap of the init-replacement story, albeit one that steered mercifully clear of the quarrels and stuck to the technical side. Initial discussions for replacing the System V init system began as far back as 2007, but pressure grew in recent years, included considerable demand from system administrators and upstream projects (typically wanting specific features like support for logind or journald). Once the Technical Committee had made its decision to adopt systemd as the default, Pitt said, "the real work" began. Read more (paywalled before)