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January 2013

5 Ubuntu alternatives worth checking out

Filed under
Linux

extremetech.com: So while Ubuntu is generally a good choice, it might not be exactly what you need. There are many other options out there that are worth knowing about.

Have some fun with Deepin 12.12 alpha

Filed under
Linux

linuxbsdos.com: Linux Deepin is one of my favorite desktop distributions. A Chinese distro that is based on Ubuntu Desktop, it is not just a rebranded Ubuntu desktop, but offers a desktop computing experience different from that of its parent distribution.

Protection against Samsung UEFI bug merged into Linux kernel

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: On Thursday morning, Linus Torvalds merged two changes into the main Linux development tree which mean that the samsung-laptop kernel driver will no longer be activated when Linux is booted via UEFI (1, 2). This should resolve the problem of some Samsung laptops being irreparably damaged when Linux is booted using UEFI.

Defence bets big on Linux

Filed under
Linux

itnews.com.au: Defence will shift about 400 more IT systems to Linux-based servers in the coming months as it nears completion of a decade-long upgrade of its radar surveillance systems.

10 open source projects to watch this year

Filed under
Software

pcworld.com: Following up on last year's list, Black Duck released its “2012 Open Source Rookies of the Year” on Wednesday, highlighting 10 key up-and-comers worth watching over the coming year. Here are 10 projects to keep an eye on:

VLC Multimedia Player Shows Changing Open Source License Is Hard, But Possible

Filed under
Software
OSS

techdirt.com: Licenses lie at the heart of open source -- and many other kinds of "open" too. That's because they are used to define the rights of users, and to ensure those rights are passed on -- that the intellectual commons is not enclosed. Their central importance explains in part the flamewars that erupt periodically over which license is "best."

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Picking up Aaron Swartz's dropped flags
  • New Secure Boot Patches Break Hibernate, Kexec Support
  • the real wikipedia of maps
  • Fedora 18 Gnome 3.6 Desktop Review
  • Kororaa 18 beta progressing well, final touches
  • Interview Google Open Source Program Manager Chris DiBona
  • Which open source software license should I use?
  • Linux Foundation Announces New Members
  • Time to drop flash
  • Tutorial 1: Hello Elementary
  • Bootstrappable Debian - New Milestone
  • No, that “Most Trusted Company for Privacy Award” does not compute
  • XBMC 12 open source media centre adds Live TV and Android support
  • Python for Kids helps adults teach programming to youth
  • Improve KDE4 Performance: Disable Nepomuk and Akonadi
  • Fedora To Look At Reviving Apache OpenOffice
  • Manokwari Desktop on openSUSE 12.2
  • How to connect to remote server via SSH using Dolphin
  • Microsoft Cradles Linus Torvalds’ (Other) Baby

Plasma Active 4

Filed under
KDE
  • Plasma Active 4
  • Plasma.next()?
  • desktop containment moving to plasma quick
  • ktouch fun

LibreOffice 3.6.5 Finishes off 3.6

Filed under
LibO

ostatic.com: Today The Document Foundation announced the release of their final 3.6 update, LibreOffice 3.6.5. "This new release is another step forward in the process of improving the overall quality and stability of LibreOffice, and facilitating the migration process to free software."

Why I contribute my changes to Libreoffice and won’t re-license

Filed under
LibO
OSS

mmohrhard.wordpress: So after reading several times on another mailing list that Libreoffice developers should relicense their patches to make them available to other descendents in the OpenOffice.org ecosystem I’m explaining why I contribute to the Libreoffice project and license my changes only as LGPLv3+/MPL.

More in Tux Machines

Security News

  • Wednesday's security updates
  • Secure your Elasticsearch cluster and avoid ransomware
    Last week, news came out that unprotected MongoDB databases are being actively compromised: content copied and replaced by a message asking for a ransom to get it back. As The Register reports: Elasticsearch is next. Protecting access to Elasticsearch by a firewall is not always possible. But even in environments where it is possible, many admins are not protecting their databases. Even if you cannot use a firewall, you can secure connection to Elasticsearch by using encryption. Elasticsearch by itself does not provide any authentication or encryption possibilities. Still, there are many third-party solutions available, each with its own drawbacks and advantages.
  • Resolve to Follow These 8 Steps for Better Data Security in 2017
    Getting physically fit is a typical New Year's resolution. Given that most of us spend more time online than in a gym, the start of the new year also might be a great time to improve your security “fitness.” As with physical fitness challenges, the biggest issue with digital security is always stagnation. That is, if you don't move and don't change, atrophy sets in. In physical fitness, atrophy is a function of muscles not being exercised. In digital fitness, security risks increase when you fail to change passwords, update network systems and adopt improved security technology. Before long, your IT systems literally become a “sitting duck.” Given the volume of data breaches that occurred in 2016, it is highly likely that everyone reading this has had at least one breach of their accounts compromised in some way, such as their Yahoo data account. Hackers somewhere may have one of the passwords you’ve used at one point to access a particular site or service. If you're still using that same password somewhere, in a way that can connect that account to you, that's a non-trivial risk. Changing passwords is the first of eight security resolutions that can help to improve your online security fitness in 2017. Click through this eWEEK slide show to discover the rest.
  • Pwn2Own 2017 Takes Aim at Linux, Servers and Web Browsers
    10th anniversary edition of Pwn2Own hacking contest offers over $1M in prize money to security researchers across a long list of targets including Virtual Machines, servers, enterprise applications and web browsers. Over the last decade, the Zero Day Initiative's (ZDI) annual Pwn2Own competition has emerged to become one of the premiere events on the information security calendar and the 2017 edition does not look to be any different. For the tenth anniversary of the Pwn2Own contest, ZDI, now owned and operated by Trend Micro, is going farther than ever before, with more targets and more prize money available for security researchers to claim by successfully executing zero-day exploits.
  • 'Factorio' is another game that was being hit by key scammers
    In another case of scammers trying to buy keys with often stolen credit cards to sell on websites like G2A, the developers of 'Factorio' have written about their experience with it (and other stuff too).

Red Hat News

Development News: LLVM, New Releases, and GCC

PulseAudio 10 and Virtual GPU in Linux

  • PulseAudio 10 Coming Soon, Using Memfd Shared Memory By Default
    It's been a half year since the debut of PulseAudio 9.0 while the release of PulseAudio 10 is coming soon. PulseAudio 9.99.1 development release was tagged earlier this month, then usually after x.99.2 marks the official release, so it won't be much longer now before seeing PulseAudio 10.0 begin to appear in Linux distributions.
  • Experimenting With Virtual GPU Support On Linux 4.10 + Libvirt
    With the Linux 4.10 kernel having initial but limited Intel Graphics Virtualization Tech support, you can begin playing with the experimental virtual GPU support using the upstream kernel and libvirt.