Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

February 2013

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Chinese Linux Distro Seeks Place in Ubuntu Family
  • Magical Realism: Kentucky Route Zero Act I
  • The Binding of Isaac to Arrive on Steam for Linux
  • Distance – First Greenlit Racing Game – Will Be Launched on Linux
  • The Humble Bundle Mojam #2
  • Novell Files Its Reply Brief v. Microsoft in WordPerfect Appeal
  • Kerkythea Echo Boost - Soon, soon everywhere
  • 'Ubuntu Touch Port-a-Thon': 25 devices and counting
  • Upgrading Fedora from F16 to F17 with seperate /usr logical volume
  • Ever heard about “ArtiKulate”?
  • The Luminosity of Free Software, episode 5
  • Meet the GIMP Episode 187
  • Linux Outlaws 300 – Linux Outlaws Live
  • Red Hat’s Whitehurst lends this advice to business leaders
  • BIND10 1.0.0 available
  • A bright future for Linux in Australia
  • Sabayon 11 Mate Review: Very efficient

“Hello” from XBMC on Wayland

Filed under
Software

smspillaz.wordpress: XBMC Media Center has always been a favorite application of mine, because of its extensive customizability and versatility, being ported to many different platforms. I am pushing some proof-of-concept code today for something I’ve been working on over the past few days to add one more to the mix – support for the wayland compositor infrastructure.

Supporting third-party keys in a Secure Boot world

Filed under
Linux

mjg59.dreamwidth.org: It's fairly straightforward to boot a UEFI Secure Boot system using something like Shim or the Linux Foundation's loader. But what about if you're a distribution that cares about booting without the user having to install keys?

Listening to music on the desktop with Clementine

Filed under
Software

scottnesbitt.net: So much music, so many desktop music players, and so little time. While I still haven’t found that music player that’s perfect for me, one that I stumbled across a while ago has made an impression. I

A swan song from this departing open source blogger

Filed under
OSS
Web

zdnet.com: As I sign off from my duties at ZDNet, and more than 20 years following open source, I am struck with the realization that open source has, in many respects, really taken over the world.

Michael Meeks about LibreOffice 4.0

Filed under
LibO
Interviews

worldofgnome.org: Michael Meeks, who has always been an important player in the LibreOffice team, explains the technical details of the highlights of this release and shares some future plans and hopes with us in this quick interview.

Bodhi Linux "Friends and Family" Edition

Filed under
Linux

ostatic.com: Bodhi Linux has earned respect and high praise from users and respected journalists all around the Linuxhood. Later Bloathi, more of a good thing, was introduced. Well, Bodhi fans, rejoice because another edition has joined the line-up. Introducing Bodhi "Friends and Family," or bloated Bodhi.

9 Linux podcasts you should follow

Filed under
Linux

networkworld.com: You need podcasts. But with so many out there, where do you start? With that question in mind, I present to you some of the best podcasts (both audio and video) that the Linux world has to offer.

Fuduntu: An Innovative Old Linux Revisited

Filed under
Linux

linuxinsider.com: Ease of navigation, better battery performance, Fedora-style functionality; how can Linux users not find the fun in Fuduntu? This distro brings the open source goodness to the desktop, and provides workarounds for popular applications like Netflix, but does so in a way that's almost an homage to classic Linux.

Choosing an open-source CMS, part 3: Why we use WordPress

Filed under
Software

computerworld.com.au: In this last installment of our three-part series on finding the best open-source content management system (CMS) for your needs, we asked two organizations -- online magazine Quartz.com and Carleton University -- to talk about why they chose WordPress over other open-source options and how well that decision has stood the test of time.

More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Code of Conduct, Kelly Davis, Celebrate Firefox Internet Champions

  • ow We’re Making Code of Conduct Enforcement Real — and Scaling it
    This is the first line of our Community Participation Guidelines — and an nudge to keep empathy at center when designing response processes. Who are you designing for? Who is impacted? What are their needs, expectations, dependencies, potential bias and limitations?
  • Role Models in AI: Kelly Davis
    Meet Kelly Davis, the Manager/Technical Lead of the machine learning group at Mozilla. His work at Mozilla includes developing an open speech recognition system with projects like Common Voice and Deep Speech (which you can help contribute to). Beyond his passion for physics and machine learning, read on to learn about how he envisions the future of AI, and advice he offers to young people looking to enter the field.
  • Celebrate Firefox Internet Champions
    While the world celebrates athletic excellence, we’re taking a moment to share some of the amazing Internet champions that help build, support and share Firefox.

Canonical Ubuntu 2017 milestones, a year in the rulebook

So has Canonical been breaking rules with Ubuntu is 2017, or has it in been writing its own rulebook? Back in April we saw an AWS-tuned kernel of Ubuntu launched, the move to cloud is unstoppable, clearly. We also saw Ubuntu version 17.04 released, with Unity 7 as the default desktop environment. This release included optimisations for environments with low powered graphics hardware. Read more Also: Ubuntu will let upgraders ‘opt-in’ to data collection in 18.04

The npm Bug

  • ​Show-stopping bug appears in npm Node.js package manager
    Are you a developer who uses npm as the package manager for your JavaScript or Node.js code? If so, do not -- I repeat do not -- upgrade to npm 5.7.0. Nothing good can come of it. As one user reported, "This destroyed 3 production servers after a single deploy!" So, what happened here? According to the npm GitHub bug report, "By running sudo npm under a non-root user (root users do not have the same effect), filesystem permissions are being heavily modified. For example, if I run sudo npm --help or sudo npm update -g, both commands cause my filesystem to change ownership of directories such as /etc, /usr, /boot, and other directories needed for running the system. It appears that the ownership is recursively changed to the user currently running npm."
  • Botched npm Update Crashes Linux Systems, Forces Users to Reinstall
    A bug in npm (Node Package Manager), the most widely used JavaScript package manager, will change ownership of crucial Linux system folders, such as /etc, /usr, /boot. Changing ownership of these files either crashes the system, various local apps, or prevents the system from booting, according to reports from users who installed npm v5.7.0. —the buggy npm update.

Windows 10 WSL vs. Linux Performance For Early 2018

Back in December was our most recent round of Windows Subsystem for Linux benchmarking with Windows 10 while since then both Linux and Windows have received new stable updates, most notably for mitigating the Spectre and Meltdown CPU vulnerabilities. For your viewing pleasure today are some fresh benchmarks looking at the Windows 10 WSL performance against Linux using the latest updates as of this week while also running some comparison tests too against Docker on Windows and Oracle VM VirtualBox. Read more