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February 2013

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Chinese Linux Distro Seeks Place in Ubuntu Family
  • Magical Realism: Kentucky Route Zero Act I
  • The Binding of Isaac to Arrive on Steam for Linux
  • Distance – First Greenlit Racing Game – Will Be Launched on Linux
  • The Humble Bundle Mojam #2
  • Novell Files Its Reply Brief v. Microsoft in WordPerfect Appeal
  • Kerkythea Echo Boost - Soon, soon everywhere
  • 'Ubuntu Touch Port-a-Thon': 25 devices and counting
  • Upgrading Fedora from F16 to F17 with seperate /usr logical volume
  • Ever heard about “ArtiKulate”?
  • The Luminosity of Free Software, episode 5
  • Meet the GIMP Episode 187
  • Linux Outlaws 300 – Linux Outlaws Live
  • Red Hat’s Whitehurst lends this advice to business leaders
  • BIND10 1.0.0 available
  • A bright future for Linux in Australia
  • Sabayon 11 Mate Review: Very efficient

“Hello” from XBMC on Wayland

Filed under
Software

smspillaz.wordpress: XBMC Media Center has always been a favorite application of mine, because of its extensive customizability and versatility, being ported to many different platforms. I am pushing some proof-of-concept code today for something I’ve been working on over the past few days to add one more to the mix – support for the wayland compositor infrastructure.

Supporting third-party keys in a Secure Boot world

Filed under
Linux

mjg59.dreamwidth.org: It's fairly straightforward to boot a UEFI Secure Boot system using something like Shim or the Linux Foundation's loader. But what about if you're a distribution that cares about booting without the user having to install keys?

Listening to music on the desktop with Clementine

Filed under
Software

scottnesbitt.net: So much music, so many desktop music players, and so little time. While I still haven’t found that music player that’s perfect for me, one that I stumbled across a while ago has made an impression. I

A swan song from this departing open source blogger

Filed under
OSS
Web

zdnet.com: As I sign off from my duties at ZDNet, and more than 20 years following open source, I am struck with the realization that open source has, in many respects, really taken over the world.

Michael Meeks about LibreOffice 4.0

Filed under
LibO
Interviews

worldofgnome.org: Michael Meeks, who has always been an important player in the LibreOffice team, explains the technical details of the highlights of this release and shares some future plans and hopes with us in this quick interview.

Bodhi Linux "Friends and Family" Edition

Filed under
Linux

ostatic.com: Bodhi Linux has earned respect and high praise from users and respected journalists all around the Linuxhood. Later Bloathi, more of a good thing, was introduced. Well, Bodhi fans, rejoice because another edition has joined the line-up. Introducing Bodhi "Friends and Family," or bloated Bodhi.

9 Linux podcasts you should follow

Filed under
Linux

networkworld.com: You need podcasts. But with so many out there, where do you start? With that question in mind, I present to you some of the best podcasts (both audio and video) that the Linux world has to offer.

Fuduntu: An Innovative Old Linux Revisited

Filed under
Linux

linuxinsider.com: Ease of navigation, better battery performance, Fedora-style functionality; how can Linux users not find the fun in Fuduntu? This distro brings the open source goodness to the desktop, and provides workarounds for popular applications like Netflix, but does so in a way that's almost an homage to classic Linux.

Choosing an open-source CMS, part 3: Why we use WordPress

Filed under
Software

computerworld.com.au: In this last installment of our three-part series on finding the best open-source content management system (CMS) for your needs, we asked two organizations -- online magazine Quartz.com and Carleton University -- to talk about why they chose WordPress over other open-source options and how well that decision has stood the test of time.

More in Tux Machines

Kernel Space/Linux

Leftovers: Software

  • KDE Kirigami 1.1 UI Framework Released
  • [GNOME Maps:] Planning a trip
  • Etcher Image Writer Is Now Better Than Ever
    Back in may we spotlighted Etcher, a stylish open-source USB image writer app for Windows, macOS and Linux. In the months since our feature the app has released a over 10 small beta updates, with Etcher 1.5 Beta being the most recent release at the time of writing.
  • Audacious 3.8 released
    Audacious 3.8 was released on September 21, 2016.
  • New Version of Audacious Music Player Released
    A new version of Audacious, a popular lightweight audio player, is now available for download. Audacious 3.8 introduces a small set of features, including the ability to run more than one instance of the app at the same time. Quite why… no idea. New audtool commands have been added, including stream recording toggles, and cue sheet support is said to be “more seamless”.
  • Rambox Puts All Your Favorite Messaging Services In One App
    Rambox is a free, open-source messaging and email app that groups all your favourite web apps into one easy-to-manage window. Sound familiar? We’ve highlighted apps like Rambox before, with Franz and the Gmail-specific Wmail being but two.
  • Stylish Markdown Editor ‘Typora’ Is Now Available for Ubuntu
    In the market for a desktop markdown editor for Linux? You may have helped but notice that you’re rather spoilt for choice. From Abricotine and Scratch to Simplenote, Springseed and Remarkable. Even Gedit can render markdown with the right plugin! With so much choice it can be difficult to know which app to pick.
  • YoutPlayer Floats Your Fave YouTube Videos on The Desktop [Ed: just an Electron app]
    Looking for a neat-o way to play YouTube playlists on your desktop, outside your browser? Take a looksie at Yout, an Electron app that lets you add and watch YouTube playlists on your desktop, floating window stylee. Yout is not the most user-friendly of apps.

today's howtos

Leftovers: Gaming

  • Avoid the pile-up in 'Clustertruck', a first-person platformer with day-1 Linux support, it's great
    We have been steadily getting more 3D "beat the timer" games where you're up against others times, which is great because they really can be fun. I do love getting competitive in certain games, especially with some of my Steam friends and friends in the wider community. Games like this recently have been something I've been repeatedly going back to for a break from life. Clustertruck is not only about beating the times of other people, but it's also a "the floor is lava" game, so if you touch the floor you have to start again. The really funny thing is that the safe pads are moving trucks you have to keep up with. You can at least grab onto the back of a truck if you just about touch it, so it's not always instant death.
  • Fusion 3, the next generation game engine and editor from Clickteam will support Linux
    The difference between their tools and others, is the event system. Instead of needing to program every single line, you can stack up events and link them together to create a game. It works quite well and I'm pretty excited to give Fusion 3 a go on Linux myself to see what random games I can create for fun.