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March 2013

some more leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Firefox gets Unreal Engine 3 support - video
  • New Racing Game for Linux
  • Two from icculus now on Steam
  • Ubuntu Powered Promo Booth? You Bet
  • Heavily-Upgraded Postal Hits Steam
  • User Interaction with Ubuntu Components
  • Full Circle Magazine Issue 71
  • Predictably non-persistent names
  • Humble Troubles Again, more platform specific bundles
  • Open Source Software Bill of Materials, What are They Good For?
  • ZFS On Linux Is Now Set For "Wide Scale Deployment"
  • Experimental Compiz, Unity Work Continues
  • Monitor ‘Zeitgeist’ Logging Activities in Ubuntu using ‘Zeitgeist Explorer’
  • Serious Sam 3: BFE for Linux Gets Big Patch
  • Ubuntu End of Life
  • Smart Scopes Not Coming In 13.04

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Playing w/ My Conky
  • Snappy, a cool media player with a Clutter interface
  • How to use anacrontab to schedule tasks
  • Why Wayland & Weston Were Forked
  • Indexing preferences in GNOME 3.8
  • Kali Linux ISO: Build a custom KDE image
  • Debian 6.0.7 (squeeze) Screenshots
  • Say Hi to J065514.3+540858
  • Distillation of KDE Git Issue
  • Are you a senior KDE developer? Join openSUSE
  • MailMerge on free Offices
  • The Linux Desktop Mess
  • Luminosity of Free Software, Episode 9
  • FLOSS Weekly 246
  • Linux Outlaws 304 – Hummusgate

Return to Root: How to Get Started With Debian

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

linux.com: Debian comes in four flavors: Stable, Testing, Unstable, and Experimental. Packages start out in Experimental, and migrate down through Unstable, Testing, and finally land in Stable.

SolidRun CuBox Review – A Tiny PC

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxuser.co.uk: The CuBox, announced in December 2011, has been slow in coming to the UK, but is finally available through compact computing specialist New IT. Has it been worth the wait?

Review: Pardus 2013 KDE

Filed under
Linux

dasublogbyprashanth.blogspot: My spring break is coming to an end (I only have 1.5 more days), so I figured it might be nice to do another review while I still can. Today I'm reviewing Pardus 2013.

some odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • Google's New Open Source Patent Pledge: We Won't Sue Unless Attacked First
  • Migrating to LibreOffice? Here's Help
  • Migration to Document Freedom Isn't As Easy As It Seems
  • Why Did Wall Street Let Red Hat Off the Hook?
  • Red Hat CEO: Employees 'Often Call Me An Idiot To My Face'
  • RIT receives donation from Red Hat, Inc
  • Meet the GIMP: Episode 189: Currywurst for Beginners
  • Power to the Raspberry PI
  • Speedy Synapse Fires Up Searches and Launches
  • Microsoft Windows 8 UEFI Secure Boot complaint: The case for and against
  • Matthew Garrett: Secure Boot and Restricted Boot
  • Systemd 199 Has Its Own D-Bus Client Library
  • GNOME 3.8 Release Announcement
  • LibrePlanet 2013 T-Shirts

The Two Faces of Linux

Filed under
Linux
  • The Two Faces of Linux - Robust Server versus Stagnant Desktop Market Shares
  • ArchLinux Decided To Move To MariaDB
  • Red Hat Earnings Said Not As Bad As First Seemed
  • Red Hat, Rackspace win early dismissal of Uniloc patent suit
  • calamariOS, Huh, What?
  • MariaDB is conquering the “desktop” distributions
  • DistroRank Weekly rankings posted
  • Pardus 2013 Is Here
  • The GRUB Battle Again: Getting Mageia to Coexist with AntiX
  • My last comment on "Linux" vs "GNU/Linux"
  • DreamWorks Uses GNU/Linux For Workstations And Servers
  • What is going on for Kali Linux (Full Version)?
  • HOWTO : Pentoo 2013.0 RC1.1 on ASUS Sabertooth X79
  • The Croods was made with the help of Linux
  • Netflix: Still no plans for Linux support

asciiquarium: Cheaper and cleaner than the real thing

Filed under
Software
HowTos
  • asciiquarium: Cheaper and cleaner than the real thing
  • Pass – A perfect shell based password manager
  • Converting ext3 to ext4 filesystem
  • textmaze: Let’s call it a game
  • 4 gui applications for installing Linux from USB key
  • weatherspect: Edutainment, I suppose
  • Nautilus Tips and Tweaks, openSUSE 12.3
  • How to dual-boot Windows 8 and Linux
  • Mastering The Linux Shell: Standard In, Out, and Error
  • Setup Mail Server In Minutes Using IRedMail In Ubuntu 12.10 / Debian 6
  • Writing and reading code

GNOME 3.8 & KDE 4.10 - See What's New

Filed under
KDE
Software
  • GNOME 3.8 Released - See What's New
  • KDE Plasma Desktop 4.10 Latest Features

Mark Shuttleworth ‘Most Disruptive Name in Computing’ Says Forbes

Filed under
Ubuntu

omgubuntu.co.uk: Mark Shuttleworth has been named as one American magazine Forbes‘ ’12 Most Disruptive Names in business’

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Licensing resource series: Free GNU/Linux distributions & GNU Bucks

When Richard Stallman set out to create the GNU Project, the goal was to create a fully free operating system. Over 33 years later, it is now possible for users to have a computer that runs only free software. But even if all the software is available, putting it all together yourself, or finding a distribution that comes with only free software, would be quite the task. That is why we provide a list of Free GNU/Linux distributions. Each distro on the list is commited to only distributing free software. With many to choose from, you can find a distro that meets your needs while respecting your freedom. But with so much software making up an entire operating system, how is it possible to make sure that nothing nasty sneaks into the distro? That's where you, and GNU Bucks come in. Read more

Linux 4.7.6

I'm announcing the release of the 4.7.6 kernel. All users of the 4.7 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 4.7.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.7.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st... Read more Also: Linux 4.4.23

Linaro beams LITE at Internet of Things devices

Linaro launched a “Linaro IoT and Embedded” (LITE) group, to develop end-to-end open source reference software for IoT devices and applications. Linaro, which is owned by ARM and major ARM licensees, and which develops open source software for ARM devices, launched a Linaro IoT and Embedded (LITE) Segment Group at this week’s Linaro Connect event in Las Vegas. The objective of the LITE initiative is to produce “end to end open source reference software for more secure connected products, ranging from sensors and connected controllers to smart devices and gateways, for the industrial and consumer markets,” says Linaro. Read more Also:

  • Linaro organisation, with ARM, aims for end-end open source IoT code
    With the objective of producing reference software for more secure connected products, ranging from sensors and connected controllers to smart devices and gateways, for the industrial and consumer markets, Linaro has announced LITE: Collaborative Software Engineering for the Internet of Things (IoT). Linaro and the LITE members will work to reduce fragmentation in operating systems, middleware and cloud connectivity solutions, and will deliver open source device reference platforms to enable faster time to market, improved security and lower maintenance costs for connected products. Industry interoperability of diverse, connected and secure IoT devices is a critical need to deliver on the promise of the IoT market, the organisation says. “Today, product vendors are faced with a proliferation of choices for IoT device operating systems, security infrastructure, identification, communication, device management and cloud interfaces.”
  • An open source approach to securing The Internet of Things
  • Addressing the IoT Security Problem
    Last week's DDOS takedown of security guru Brian Krebs' website made history on several levels. For one, it was the largest such reported attack ever, with unwanted traffic to the site hitting levels of 620 Gbps, more than double the previous record set back in 2013, and signalling that the terabyte threshold will certainly be crossed soon. It also relied primarily on compromised Internet of Things devices.