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March 2013

some more leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Firefox gets Unreal Engine 3 support - video
  • New Racing Game for Linux
  • Two from icculus now on Steam
  • Ubuntu Powered Promo Booth? You Bet
  • Heavily-Upgraded Postal Hits Steam
  • User Interaction with Ubuntu Components
  • Full Circle Magazine Issue 71
  • Predictably non-persistent names
  • Humble Troubles Again, more platform specific bundles
  • Open Source Software Bill of Materials, What are They Good For?
  • ZFS On Linux Is Now Set For "Wide Scale Deployment"
  • Experimental Compiz, Unity Work Continues
  • Monitor ‘Zeitgeist’ Logging Activities in Ubuntu using ‘Zeitgeist Explorer’
  • Serious Sam 3: BFE for Linux Gets Big Patch
  • Ubuntu End of Life
  • Smart Scopes Not Coming In 13.04

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Playing w/ My Conky
  • Snappy, a cool media player with a Clutter interface
  • How to use anacrontab to schedule tasks
  • Why Wayland & Weston Were Forked
  • Indexing preferences in GNOME 3.8
  • Kali Linux ISO: Build a custom KDE image
  • Debian 6.0.7 (squeeze) Screenshots
  • Say Hi to J065514.3+540858
  • Distillation of KDE Git Issue
  • Are you a senior KDE developer? Join openSUSE
  • MailMerge on free Offices
  • The Linux Desktop Mess
  • Luminosity of Free Software, Episode 9
  • FLOSS Weekly 246
  • Linux Outlaws 304 – Hummusgate

Return to Root: How to Get Started With Debian

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

linux.com: Debian comes in four flavors: Stable, Testing, Unstable, and Experimental. Packages start out in Experimental, and migrate down through Unstable, Testing, and finally land in Stable.

SolidRun CuBox Review – A Tiny PC

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxuser.co.uk: The CuBox, announced in December 2011, has been slow in coming to the UK, but is finally available through compact computing specialist New IT. Has it been worth the wait?

Review: Pardus 2013 KDE

Filed under
Linux

dasublogbyprashanth.blogspot: My spring break is coming to an end (I only have 1.5 more days), so I figured it might be nice to do another review while I still can. Today I'm reviewing Pardus 2013.

some odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • Google's New Open Source Patent Pledge: We Won't Sue Unless Attacked First
  • Migrating to LibreOffice? Here's Help
  • Migration to Document Freedom Isn't As Easy As It Seems
  • Why Did Wall Street Let Red Hat Off the Hook?
  • Red Hat CEO: Employees 'Often Call Me An Idiot To My Face'
  • RIT receives donation from Red Hat, Inc
  • Meet the GIMP: Episode 189: Currywurst for Beginners
  • Power to the Raspberry PI
  • Speedy Synapse Fires Up Searches and Launches
  • Microsoft Windows 8 UEFI Secure Boot complaint: The case for and against
  • Matthew Garrett: Secure Boot and Restricted Boot
  • Systemd 199 Has Its Own D-Bus Client Library
  • GNOME 3.8 Release Announcement
  • LibrePlanet 2013 T-Shirts

The Two Faces of Linux

Filed under
Linux
  • The Two Faces of Linux - Robust Server versus Stagnant Desktop Market Shares
  • ArchLinux Decided To Move To MariaDB
  • Red Hat Earnings Said Not As Bad As First Seemed
  • Red Hat, Rackspace win early dismissal of Uniloc patent suit
  • calamariOS, Huh, What?
  • MariaDB is conquering the “desktop” distributions
  • DistroRank Weekly rankings posted
  • Pardus 2013 Is Here
  • The GRUB Battle Again: Getting Mageia to Coexist with AntiX
  • My last comment on "Linux" vs "GNU/Linux"
  • DreamWorks Uses GNU/Linux For Workstations And Servers
  • What is going on for Kali Linux (Full Version)?
  • HOWTO : Pentoo 2013.0 RC1.1 on ASUS Sabertooth X79
  • The Croods was made with the help of Linux
  • Netflix: Still no plans for Linux support

asciiquarium: Cheaper and cleaner than the real thing

Filed under
Software
HowTos
  • asciiquarium: Cheaper and cleaner than the real thing
  • Pass – A perfect shell based password manager
  • Converting ext3 to ext4 filesystem
  • textmaze: Let’s call it a game
  • 4 gui applications for installing Linux from USB key
  • weatherspect: Edutainment, I suppose
  • Nautilus Tips and Tweaks, openSUSE 12.3
  • How to dual-boot Windows 8 and Linux
  • Mastering The Linux Shell: Standard In, Out, and Error
  • Setup Mail Server In Minutes Using IRedMail In Ubuntu 12.10 / Debian 6
  • Writing and reading code

GNOME 3.8 & KDE 4.10 - See What's New

Filed under
KDE
Software
  • GNOME 3.8 Released - See What's New
  • KDE Plasma Desktop 4.10 Latest Features

Mark Shuttleworth ‘Most Disruptive Name in Computing’ Says Forbes

Filed under
Ubuntu

omgubuntu.co.uk: Mark Shuttleworth has been named as one American magazine Forbes‘ ’12 Most Disruptive Names in business’

More in Tux Machines

GNOME: WebKit, Fleet Commander, Introducing deviced

  • On Compiling WebKit (now twice as fast!)
    Are you tired of waiting for ages to build large C++ projects like WebKit? Slow headers are generally the problem. Your C++ source code file #includes a few headers, all those headers #include more, and those headers #include more, and more, and more, and since it’s C++ a bunch of these headers contain lots of complex templates to slow down things even more. Not fun.
  • Fleet Commander is looking for a GSoC student to help us take over the world
    Fleet Commander has seen quite a lot of progress recently, of which I should blog about soon. For those unaware, Fleet Commander is an effort to make GNOME great for IT administrators in large deployments, allowing them to deploy desktop and application configuration profiles across hundreds of machines with ease through a web administration UI based on Cockpit. It is mostly implemented in Python.
  • Introducing deviced
    Over the past couple of weeks I’ve been heads down working on a new tool along with Patrick Griffis. The purpose of this tool is to make it easier to integrate IDEs and other tooling with GNU-based gadgets like phones, tablets, infotainment, and IoT devices. Years ago I was working on a GNOME-based home router with davidz which sadly we never finished. One thing that was obvious to me in that moment of time was that I’m not doing another large scale project until I had better tooling. That is Builder’s genesis, and device integration is what will make it truly useful to myself and others who love playing with GNU-friendly gadgets.

KDE: Usability & Productivity, AtCore , Krita

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 6
  • AtCore takes to the pi
    The Raspberry Pi3 is a small single board computer that costs around $35 (USD). It comes with a network port, wifi , bt , 4 usb ports , gpio pins , camera port , a display out, hdmi, a TRRS for analog A/V out. 1GB of ran and 4 ~1GHz armv8 cores Inside small SOC. Its storage is a microSd card they are a low cost and low power device. The Touchscreen kit is an 800×480 display that hooks to the Gpio for touch and dsi port for video. To hold our hardware is the standard touch screen enclosure that often comes with the screen if you buy it in a kit.
  • Look, new presets! Another Krita 4 development build!
    We’ve been focusing like crazy on the Krita 4 release. We managed to close some 150 bugs in the past month, and Krita 4 is getting stable enough for many people to use day in, day out. There’s still more to be done, of course! So we’ll continue fixing issues and applying polish for at least another four weeks. One of the things we’re doing as well is redesigning the set of default brush presets and brush tips that come with Krita. Brush tips are the little images one can paint with, and brush presets are the brushes you can select in the brush palette or brush popup. The combination of a tip, some settings and a smart bit of coding! Our old set was fine, but it was based on David Revoy‘s earliest Krita brush bundles, and for Krita 4 we are revamping the entire set. We’ve added many new options to the brushes since then! So, many artists are working together to create a good-looking, useful and interesting brushes for Krita 4.

Software: GIMP, Spyder, SMPlayer

  • Five free photo and video editing tools that could save burning a hole in your pocket and take your creativity to the next level
    GIMP stands for the Gnu Image Manipulation Program and is the first word that people usually think about when it comes to free image editors. It’s a raster graphics editor, available on multiple platforms on PC. It has a similar interface to Photoshop: you have your tools on one side, there’s an option for your tool window and then you have your layers window on another side. Perhaps one of the most useful features of GIMP is the option of plugins. There is a wide database for them and there’s a plugin for almost any task you might need to carry out. GIMP is extremely extensive, and it’s the choice of the FOSS community, thanks to the fact that it’s also open source. However, there are also some disadvantages. For example, GIMP has no direct RAW support yet (you have to install a plugin to enable it, which means a split workflow). It also has quite a bit of a learning curve as compared to Photoshop or Lightroom.
  • Introducing Spyder, the Scientific PYthon Development EnviRonment
    If you want to use Anaconda for science projects, one of the first things to consider is the spyder package, which is included in the basic Anaconda installation. Spyder is short for Scientific PYthon Development EnviRonment. Think of it as an IDE for scientific programming within Python.
  • SMPlayer 18.2.2 Released, Install In Ubuntu/Linux Mint Via PPA
    SMPlayer is a free media player created for Linux and Windows, it was released under GNU General Public License. Unlike other players it doesn't require you to install codecs to play something because it carries its own all required codecs with itself. This is the first release which now support MPV and some other features such as MPRIS v2 Support, new theme, 3D stereo filter and more. It uses the award-winning MPlayer as playback engine which is capable of playing almost all known video and audio formats (avi, mkv, wmv, mp4, mpeg... see list).

Funding: Ethereum and Outreachy

  • How Will a $100 Mln Grant Help Ethereum Scale?
    On Feb. 16, six large-scale Blockchain projects OmiseGo, Cosmos, Golem, Maker and Raiden, that have completed successful multi-million dollar initial coin offerings (ICOs) last year, along with Japanese venture capital firm Global Brain have created the Ethereum Community Fund (ECF), to fund projects and businesses within the Ethereum ecosystem.
  • Outreachy Is Now Accepting Applications For Their Summer 2018 Internships
    This week Google announced the participating organizations for GSoC 2018 for students wishing to get involved with open-source/Linux development. Also happening this week is the application period opened for those wishing to participate in the summer 2018 paid internship program.