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March 2013

some more leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Firefox gets Unreal Engine 3 support - video
  • New Racing Game for Linux
  • Two from icculus now on Steam
  • Ubuntu Powered Promo Booth? You Bet
  • Heavily-Upgraded Postal Hits Steam
  • User Interaction with Ubuntu Components
  • Full Circle Magazine Issue 71
  • Predictably non-persistent names
  • Humble Troubles Again, more platform specific bundles
  • Open Source Software Bill of Materials, What are They Good For?
  • ZFS On Linux Is Now Set For "Wide Scale Deployment"
  • Experimental Compiz, Unity Work Continues
  • Monitor ‘Zeitgeist’ Logging Activities in Ubuntu using ‘Zeitgeist Explorer’
  • Serious Sam 3: BFE for Linux Gets Big Patch
  • Ubuntu End of Life
  • Smart Scopes Not Coming In 13.04

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Playing w/ My Conky
  • Snappy, a cool media player with a Clutter interface
  • How to use anacrontab to schedule tasks
  • Why Wayland & Weston Were Forked
  • Indexing preferences in GNOME 3.8
  • Kali Linux ISO: Build a custom KDE image
  • Debian 6.0.7 (squeeze) Screenshots
  • Say Hi to J065514.3+540858
  • Distillation of KDE Git Issue
  • Are you a senior KDE developer? Join openSUSE
  • MailMerge on free Offices
  • The Linux Desktop Mess
  • Luminosity of Free Software, Episode 9
  • FLOSS Weekly 246
  • Linux Outlaws 304 – Hummusgate

Return to Root: How to Get Started With Debian

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

linux.com: Debian comes in four flavors: Stable, Testing, Unstable, and Experimental. Packages start out in Experimental, and migrate down through Unstable, Testing, and finally land in Stable.

SolidRun CuBox Review – A Tiny PC

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxuser.co.uk: The CuBox, announced in December 2011, has been slow in coming to the UK, but is finally available through compact computing specialist New IT. Has it been worth the wait?

Review: Pardus 2013 KDE

Filed under
Linux

dasublogbyprashanth.blogspot: My spring break is coming to an end (I only have 1.5 more days), so I figured it might be nice to do another review while I still can. Today I'm reviewing Pardus 2013.

some odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • Google's New Open Source Patent Pledge: We Won't Sue Unless Attacked First
  • Migrating to LibreOffice? Here's Help
  • Migration to Document Freedom Isn't As Easy As It Seems
  • Why Did Wall Street Let Red Hat Off the Hook?
  • Red Hat CEO: Employees 'Often Call Me An Idiot To My Face'
  • RIT receives donation from Red Hat, Inc
  • Meet the GIMP: Episode 189: Currywurst for Beginners
  • Power to the Raspberry PI
  • Speedy Synapse Fires Up Searches and Launches
  • Microsoft Windows 8 UEFI Secure Boot complaint: The case for and against
  • Matthew Garrett: Secure Boot and Restricted Boot
  • Systemd 199 Has Its Own D-Bus Client Library
  • GNOME 3.8 Release Announcement
  • LibrePlanet 2013 T-Shirts

The Two Faces of Linux

Filed under
Linux
  • The Two Faces of Linux - Robust Server versus Stagnant Desktop Market Shares
  • ArchLinux Decided To Move To MariaDB
  • Red Hat Earnings Said Not As Bad As First Seemed
  • Red Hat, Rackspace win early dismissal of Uniloc patent suit
  • calamariOS, Huh, What?
  • MariaDB is conquering the “desktop” distributions
  • DistroRank Weekly rankings posted
  • Pardus 2013 Is Here
  • The GRUB Battle Again: Getting Mageia to Coexist with AntiX
  • My last comment on "Linux" vs "GNU/Linux"
  • DreamWorks Uses GNU/Linux For Workstations And Servers
  • What is going on for Kali Linux (Full Version)?
  • HOWTO : Pentoo 2013.0 RC1.1 on ASUS Sabertooth X79
  • The Croods was made with the help of Linux
  • Netflix: Still no plans for Linux support

asciiquarium: Cheaper and cleaner than the real thing

Filed under
Software
HowTos
  • asciiquarium: Cheaper and cleaner than the real thing
  • Pass – A perfect shell based password manager
  • Converting ext3 to ext4 filesystem
  • textmaze: Let’s call it a game
  • 4 gui applications for installing Linux from USB key
  • weatherspect: Edutainment, I suppose
  • Nautilus Tips and Tweaks, openSUSE 12.3
  • How to dual-boot Windows 8 and Linux
  • Mastering The Linux Shell: Standard In, Out, and Error
  • Setup Mail Server In Minutes Using IRedMail In Ubuntu 12.10 / Debian 6
  • Writing and reading code

GNOME 3.8 & KDE 4.10 - See What's New

Filed under
KDE
Software
  • GNOME 3.8 Released - See What's New
  • KDE Plasma Desktop 4.10 Latest Features

Mark Shuttleworth ‘Most Disruptive Name in Computing’ Says Forbes

Filed under
Ubuntu

omgubuntu.co.uk: Mark Shuttleworth has been named as one American magazine Forbes‘ ’12 Most Disruptive Names in business’

More in Tux Machines

Possible changes to Debian's decision-making processes

To a great extent, Debian leaves decisions in the hands of its individual developers. A developer's package is their castle, and they can generally manage it as they see fit. That freedom is somewhat constrained by the Debian constitution and the extensive Debian policy manual, both of which are designed to ensure that both developers and the packages they create all get along. Most of the time, this process just works, the project generates (mostly) regular releases, and users are happy. Occasionally, though, some sort of intervention is required; two of the mechanisms provided by the project for such cases are the Technical Committee and general resolutions. The Technical Committee is empowered to make decisions on technical policy and may, in extreme cases, override Debian developers if their actions are seen as sufficiently damaging to the distribution. General resolutions can, by way of a vote of the project membership, change or override decisions made by the Technical Committee (or others), set new policies, or amend the constitution. Voting is a key part of decision-making at levels above the individual developer. This is not particularly unusual in the free-software community; many projects make decisions by a vote of either the general membership or some sort of elected (via a vote, usually) representatives. Debian is nearly unique, though, in the way it decides what its members will vote on. Rather than simply being presented with a list of choices, Debian developers create those choices themselves, often in great number, and often with a lot of associated discussion. The creation of the ballot is the important part of a Debian resolution; the vote at the end is just calculating the final score. This process is designed to create outcomes that reflect, as well as possible, the will of the project as a whole. Debian's voting scheme allows a ballot to contain numerous options with small differences without fear of splitting the vote in a way that causes a relatively unpopular option to ultimately prevail. At its best, it creates ballots where developers can vote for the options they want rather than just voting against the worst case. Read more

Premium Open-Source WhatsApp Alternative “Threema” is Now Available for Desktop

Threema is one of the best secure alternatives to WhatsApp as a paid app (Swiss-based) that does not require a mobile number or email to sign up while using a decentralized architecture. While Threema is known for its security features long before WhatsApp advertised secure messaging, it wasn’t originally open-source. However, last year, Threema worked on making all of their applications open-source on GitHub with the ability to have reproducible builds as well. Now, it looks like Threema has introduced desktop application support for Linux, Windows, and macOS. Read more

Security Leftovers

  • 2021 CWE Most Important Hardware Weaknesses

    The 2021 Hardware List is a compilation of the most frequent and critical errors that can lead to serious vulnerabilities in hardware. An attacker can often exploit these vulnerabilities to take control of an affected system, obtain sensitive information, or cause a denial-of-service condition.

  • Security updates for Thursday

    Security updates have been issued by openSUSE (salt), Slackware (bind), SUSE (salt), and Ubuntu (php5, php7.0, php7.2, php7.4, php8.0).

  • Enhance the security of your open-source applications and share feedback

    Are you spending time on high-impact, high-value activities, or are you constantly derailed by maintenance, support, and deployment challenges? Does your organisation consume open-source software that needs security patching? Where do you get the security updates from, and how do you track what’s available? Are you responsible for vulnerability management, compliance, and long term maintenance of the software running on top of Ubuntu in your organisation? Do you have reliable processes, tools, and metrics to ensure that you have the visibility needed to run all of your stack securely?

  • Cisco Releases Security Updates for Multiple Products

    Cisco has released security updates to address vulnerabilities in multiple Cisco products. A remote attacker could exploit some of these vulnerabilities to take control of an affected system. For updates addressing lower severity vulnerabilities, see the Cisco Security Advisory

today's howtos

  • How To Install Munin on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Munin on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. For those of you who didn’t know, Munin is a web-based tool to monitor system and network statistics. Munin shows this information through Graphs. It helps the system administrators to collect various system information that can be viewed via a web interface such as processor load, hard disk usage, network traffic, access to server services on one or more computers, and more. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you the step-by-step installation of the Munin server monitoring on Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa). You can follow the same instructions for Ubuntu 18.04, 16.04, and any other Debian-based distribution like Linux Mint.

  • How to Install Ruby on Rails on Debian 11

    Ruby on Rails is a free, open-source, and one of the most popular application stacks used for creating sites and web apps. It is written in Ruby programming language and follows the MVC concept. It comes with the Rails development framework that makes app development easier. There are many well-known applications based on Rails, such as Github, Airbnb, Soundcloud, etc. In this tutorial, I will show you how to install Ruby on Rails on a Debian 11 system.

  • How to Install Python 3.9 on Rocky Linux 8

    Python is a programming language that can be used to create just about anything. From full-scale games to web applications, and even simple scripts for your PC or Mac. Python has been around since the late 1980s and continues to be one of the most popular languages in use today. Today’s tutorial will show you how to install Python 3.9 programming language on a Rocky Linux 8 system.

  • How to Install Yarn JS (Node) Package Manager on Debian 11 – VITUX

    Yarn is a package manager for Javascript. It is meant to replace npm (node package manager). Yarn uses a different way to install packages. Instead of installing from the registry, it installs packages from other nodes in your network that have already downloaded the package and its dependencies. This can speed up installations, especially in projects with lots of node modules. Yarn works exactly the same as npm, but with some benefits. First of all, it tells you which version of a package that was installed is compatible with your project. This makes it easier if you need to roll back or update packages. Secondly, it makes your packages more secure. Every package’s checksum is validated before it’s run by Yarn. This means that if a developer installs an outdated or corrupted package, Yarn will be able to detect the error, show the error in an easy-to-read format, and allow them to correct it before executing the code. It isn’t easy to say whether the yarn is better than npm or vice versa. It’s just different. If you want an easy-to-use package manager that makes your packages more secure, the yarn might be the answer. If you are a developer, chances are you have heard of Yarn. Installing yarn on Debian 11 can be tricky if you’re unfamiliar with the process, but this tutorial will walk you through the process step-by-step so that after reading this post, installing Yarn should be as easy as 1-2-3!

  • How to Record Your Desktop Screen in Ubuntu 21.10 Wayland with Kooha | UbuntuHandbook

    Looking for how to record Ubuntu desktop in Wayland session? Here’s how to do it in Ubuntu 21.10 using Kooha. Ubuntu switched to “Wayland” session since Ubuntu 21.04. However, many apps, e.g., Kazam, Peek and vokoscreen-NG, do not support it. Some apps including OBS-Studio claim to support for Wayland, but either record blank screen or just refuse to work! The best solution in my opinion is switch back to Xorg session. To do so, simply log out, select your user and then choose “Ubuntu on Xorg” via bottom-right gear button menu. All the apps will work once you login with Xorg. For those sticking to the default Wayland, Kooha is one of good choices until GNOME’s “in-shell” screenshot & screencast UI is out.

  • How to configure automatic updates in Ubuntu Server - blackMORE Ops

    This guide explains how to configure automatic updates in Ubuntu Server 20.04. This tutorial is based on the following official Ubuntu Documentation article: Ubuntu Server Guide » Package Management » Automatic Updates. If you just want to do it, scroll down to the end and copy paste the two configuration file configs and you’re done. If you want to understand it and tweak, then keep reading.

  • How to create an Application Load Balancer on AWS

    Load Balancer falls under the EC2 services of AWS. An Application Load Balancer works at the seventh layer of the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) model, the application layer. We can add and remove targets from our load balancer as per our needs without affecting the flow of requests to the application. Application Load Balancer supports for path-based routing: forward requests based on the URL in the request, host-based routing: forward requests based on the host field in the HTTP header, routing based on fields in the request, registering targets by IP address: targets outside the VPC for the load balancer can also be added. These are a few of the benefits of using the Application Load Balancer.

  • How to edit files inside Docker container? - blackMORE Ops

    Just migrating everything to bunch of new RaspberryPi 4 8GB from my VMware farm. Instead of using multiple Raspberry Pi 4, I decided to use Docker and move as many I can into each one of these. I’ve think Home Assistant (with supervisor), Pi-Hole, Pi-VPN, UnBound and my NoIP2 scripts one Raspberry Pi4 8GB Pi running Debian 11 BullsEye and docker and Plex Server onto another Pi should do the trick. Anyhow, ran into an interesting problem with Undound where I needed to edit the configuration file nano application.yaml or vi unbound.sh and it said, nano or vi wasn’t installed.

  • Configuring TACACS+ Server With A Simple GUI | Linux Journal

    Managing authentication and authorization in a large-scale network is a challenge: the passwords need to be set and rotated every now and then, access to certain configuration settings needs to be controlled and, finally, users’ actions need to be logged somewhere. This poses a need for a centralized controller in the network that is responsible for such functions. Modern routers and switches, which typically run Linux operating systems, support TACACS+ protocol that enables system administrators to implement flexible rules for authentication and authorization. However, TACACS+ server implementation for Linux operating system, although neat, lacks a graphical user interface which makes daemon configuration a smooth and intuitive process. In the next few paragraphs, we will discuss how to configure the TACACS+ daemon on Linux operating system and demonstrate how to deploy a simple, yet intuitive, GUI used for the configuration of the TACACS+ instance. TACACS+, which stands for Terminal Access Controller Access-Control System Plus, is a protocol mainly designed by Cisco and standardized in RFC8907. The primary goal of the protocol is to handle authentication and authorization of commands executed on remote telecommunication hardware on a centralized server. TACACS+ is a great protocol and can be compared to RADIUS. Its key advantages are the following: it allows scrambling or obfuscating (although, not really encrypting in a cryptographic sense) the entire payload with help of MD5 hash function and a secret shared between telecommunication hardware and a central server, it supports TCP protocol for transport, and it provides the possibility of carrying out AAA functions in a flexible way. More details on the protocol can be found in the corresponding RFC.

  • Install Veritas Cluster server on CentOS 8 | RHEL 8 step by step - Unixcop

    This step-by-step guide intended to provide practical documentation for installing InfoScale Enterprise 7.4.1 in a non-production capacity. There is a innumerable of configurations for software products and the one used in this article is only meant to be used to demonstrate InfoScale’s . In this article we are about to learn how to Install Veritas Cluster server on CentOS 8 | RHEL 8 step by step. So The installation of InfoScale can_be performed using ISO installer, YUM, Response file, Kick start installer or from System management Satellite server. Also In our article, we are going to accomplish the installation using ISO installer.

  • Kubernetes: Install using MicroK8s on Ubuntu - Anto ./ Online

    This guide will show you how to install Kubernetes using MicroK8s on Ubuntu. MicroK8s makes it super easy to get going with Kubernetes. Additionally, MicroK8s is bundled with tools such as Prometheus. So you simply enable a feature if you need it.

  • How to install Anydesk on Ubuntu / Linux Mint - Unixcop

    AnyDesk is a closed source remote desktop application distributed by AnyDesk Software GmbH. The proprietary software program provides platform independent remote access to personal computers and other devices running the host application Due to this, the program often employed by internet scammers to take control of their victims computer over the internet. It offers remote control, file transfer, and VPN functionality. Also Anydesk has an attractive user-friendly interface and administrative tools through which you can easily manage the remote systems. WithAnyDesk, you can record everything you see on your computer as a video file so you can play back at any time. So In this guide, we will show you how to install AnyDesk on Ubuntu 20.04 and Linux Mint 20 After that you can easily access your team member or friend’s system.