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April 2013

Working with Stdin and Stdout

Filed under
Software
HowTos
  • Working with Stdin and Stdout
  • Open Build Service version 2.4 released
  • Please, stay away from rebase
  • Hacking on Ubiquity, the setup
  • "Await" in Python

Ubuntu 13.04 Review – Spot the difference

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 13.04 Review – Spot the difference
  • How to Disable Window Effects in Ubuntu 13.04
  • Xubuntu 13.04 Review: Rock solid and stable
  • 13 Reasons to Deploy With Ubuntu Server
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 314

Poll: Which distros would you save?

Filed under
Linux

everydaylinuxuser.com: One of the comments that is quite often made on Reddit and in other Linux forums is that there are a lot of distributions that are just re-spins of Ubuntu, Fedora, openSUSE etc. Suppose limits, which distributions would you save?

Debian 7.0 Wheezy - my hands on

Filed under
Linux
  • Debian 7.0 Wheezy - my hands on with a pre-release build
  • Lightweight Debian: LXDE Desktop From Scratch
  • Debian developers set to party

why there’s no need for distributions to use the same package format

Filed under
Linux

happyassassin.net: The problem Bryan identifies affects third parties providing Linux applications directly to users: Bryan trying to provide his games to users of different distributions, or Google trying to provide Chrome, or Mozilla trying to provide Firefox, and so on and so forth.

some leftovers:

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • Little Black Box Open Source XBMC Media Centre Unveiled
  • Open Source by Default
  • Raspberry Pi Case by SB Components Review
  • Why Open Source Software is Like Burning Man
  • A change in the open source software market

Compromised Apache binaries

Filed under
Software
  • Compromised Apache binaries load malicious code
  • Doomsday Engine on openSUSE
  • Hotshots – Screenshot tool with editing
  • Vim Sessions
  • rekonq 2.3.0 almost ready
  • Strange Puzzle Game "Kairo" Launches on Steam for Linux
  • another opensuse wallpaper
  • dmesg -H is sexy
  • BitTorrent Sync: Painless File Syncing without the Cloud
  • Useful Gimp Keyboard Shortcuts in Debian/Ubuntu
  • Image annotation in GIMP, Dia, and OpenOffice Draw
  • LibreOffice Happy To Work With Coverity Scan Results
  • Stealth Bastard Deluxe Sneaks Onto Linux thru Steam
  • "The 39 Steps" Will Combine Film and Literature

SolydXK Added to Distrowatch Database

Filed under
Linux
  • SolydXK Added to Distrowatch Database
  • Testing Hardware Compatibility with Knoppix on Asus U80A
  • Linux? What's That?? -- Soon No more
  • Windows Blue & Desktop death nonsense
  • Why you should go to a Linux event
  • Confused by FuSE
  • Linux Tweaks for Samsung 535U3C
  • Once again, Linux Fest Northwest nails it
  • List Of Linux Operating System For Ham Radio Operator
  • The new BeagleBone Black and Gentoo
  • Open build service gets a facelift

Compiling your own custom kernel for fun and profit

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

anarchic-order.blogspot: You know that Linux kernel thing, that has thousands of developers from all over the world, some of which do it professionally, most of which do it for the love of solving problems (or something)? I look at it as a great chance for learning.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Leftovers: Gaming

Android Leftovers

  • 10 Android for Work Features Sure to Appeal to Enterprises
    There's a new enterprise mobile platform for companies that are prepared to invest in Android. Google has introduced its long-awaited mobile device management (MDM) platform Android for Work. Android for Work gives IT departments and companies a more secure way for employees to access corporate data and applications with their Android mobile devices. It's the Android equivalent of platforms such as Apple's own MDM platform and others from Good Technology and BlackBerry. One advantage Android for Work has that all those others don't, however, is that it can be used on more than a billion Android devices that are in users' hands around the world. In other words, it's an MDM system that's destined to be adopted on a massive scale worldwide. But what in Android for Work will make it an effective management tool for the millions of workers who want to not only bring their Android mobile devices to work but use them productively for business? This slide show looks at the features that could make Android for Work an effective MDM platform for enterprises.
  • Android Wear’s biggest update ever takes aim at the Apple Watch
  • Android Wear’s Second Big Update Is Coming: Gestures, WiFi, And Better UI In The Next Few Weeks
    Word around the rumor mill was that Android Wear was about to get a pretty big update — and sure enough, such an update is officially on the way.
  • Android Wear adds WiFi support, always-on apps, emojis
    Google released a major update to Android Wear that adds always-on apps, WiFi support, a wrist-flipping gesture for scrolling, and emoji drawing support. Google just released a major Android 5.1.1 update for its Android Wear smartwatch platform, and considering the huge pre-sales for the Apple Watch, it’s not a moment too soon. Even with a nine month head start over the new Apple Watch, Google’s Android Wear hardware partners sold only 70,000 watches by the end of 2014, according to an early February estimate from Canalys.
  • I’m tired of getting excited about Nokia Android phones, but I can’t help it
    For years, I waited for Nokia to change its mind and start making the gorgeous Android handsets many fans wanted from the company. Instead Nokia steered clear of a path that may have brought it some success, and eventually succumbed to iOS and Android. Yet, Re/code has learned that Nokia is once again working on Android smartphones, something that was previously rumored as well, and I can’t help but get excited all over again.
  • Nokia phones expected in 2016: Android or something else?
    Nokia is planning a return to the smartphone market in 2016, after it sold off its handset business to Microsoft in 2013, sources tell Re/code. The timing is right: Based on the Microsoft deal, Nokia can't sell phones with the Nokia brand until next year.
  • Sony's Android-powered 4K TVs and new soundbars are coming in May
    After first showcasing its 2015 lineup of 4K TVs at CES earlier this year, Sony has now revealed pricing and release dates for most of the sets. All of them run Android TV, which replaces Sony's previous, clunky software for a richer experience deeply tied to Google's own software and third-party streaming apps. Most of Sony's lineup is on the larger side when it comes to display size. Though you'll find a few options available in the 43- to 55-inch range, Sony is putting the most effort into models that will dominate most home theater setups at 65 or 75 inches. It's here you'll find the flagship XBR-75X940C, a $7,999 TV that features full-array local dimming, 4K resolution, and support for HDR video output, which Sony will deliver through a firmware update sometime this summer.
  • Best new Android widgets (April 2015) #2
  • Android Lollipop OS update live for Sprint Spark-driven Samsung Galaxy S4 tri-band LTE users in US: What's new
    After rolling out the Android 5.0 (Lollipop) OS update to Samsung Galaxy Note 3 users who have subscribed to its wireless network services in the US, Sprint is now seeding the much expected OS update to Galaxy S4 owners using its Sprint Spark service in the country.
  • Android 5.1.1 Lollipop almost ready for Nexus 9, WiFi Nexus 7
    You may be excited that your device is finally getting the Android 5.0 Lollipop update but others are already getting Android 5.0.1 (Moto E, and Moto 4 with 4G LTE, Galaxy Note 4, Note Edge, Galaxy S5, Galaxy S4) and Android 5.0.2 (LG G2 from T-Mobile and AT&T, Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge, Nexus 7, original Moto X). Several mobile devices have even received Android 5.1 already like the Nexus 5, Nexus Player, HTC One (M7), Moto G GPE, LG G Pad 8.3 GPE, and the Sony Z Ultra GPE. And to further burst your bubble, sorry, but Android 5.1.1 is almost ready.
  • 8 great Google Maps tips for Android and iOS
  • ZTE's Spro 2 Android-powered 'smart projector' will hit AT&T for $399.99
    How would you like a 120-inch screen you can toss into your backpack or purse? Yes, please! First announced at CES 2015, ZTE's Android-powered smart projector Spro 2 is finally launching in the U.S. The 1.2-pound portable projector that measures 5.28 x 5.16 x 1.22 inches will be available on April 24 from AT&T.
  • Your favorite websites can now send notifications to Chrome on Android
    Support for push notifications was the most important feature in last week's Chrome 42 release — and starting today you'll begin to see why. Today, several websites including eBay, Facebook, Pinterest, Vice News, and Product Hunt will begin to offer Chrome push notifications on both desktop and Android. It's that last platform that's a big deal: websites that support Chrome push notifications can send out updates that look and feel like regular app updates even if the Chrome browser isn't currently active on an Android device.
  • Google just unveiled a hugely ambitious Android Wear update – here are the 3 coolest features
    With all the hype surrounding the Apple Watch, you may have forgotten that Google has a smartwatch software platform of its own called Android Wear. To remind us of this, Google on Monday took the wraps off a hugely ambitious Android Wear update that adds three important features that the platform had been sorely missing.
  • Samsung Galaxy S6, S6 Edge Receiving Android 5.1 Lollipop Software Update
  • Australia's first Android TV device arrives with Google Nexus Player
    The player, which runs the Android TV platform, was released in the U.S. in October 2014. It will be sold at JB Hi-Fi and Dick Smith from Tuesday for A$129. The device sits in the same market as Apple TV, and is the first device to offer Android TV locally.
  • Improve your game with the best golf Apps for Android
    These days, technology is just as much a part of golf as a good swing. Both professional and amateur players are constantly seeking an edge from the best equipment and engineering breakthroughs.
  • Nexus 5 & 7 Still Facing The Same Issues After Android 5.1 Update
    Usually with updates to software, developers try to address any bugs or issues that were present in the previous version. Unfortunately it seems that in the case of Android 5.1, Google has yet to address some problems that are still plaguing handsets like the Nexus 5 and the Nexus 7 which are no doubt rather annoying for its users. The issues in question are related to memory leaks in which after prolonged periods of use, the devices start to feel sluggish due to the amount of free RAM remaining which is less than ideal. This is an issue that Google had acknowledged back in Android 5.0.1 and was actually reported back in 2014.
  • Chrome's push notifications reach your Android phone
    Chrome's website push notifications are no longer confined to your desktop -- they now surface on your phone, too. Grab Chrome 42 for Android and you can opt into alerts from websites that show up no matter what you're doing. You won't have to worry about missing out on breaking news, even if your favorite sites don't have dedicated apps. You'll also have an easier time adding home screen shortcuts for those sites if you always want them close at hand. It'll be a while before many of the sites you frequent can deliver notifications (eBay, Facebook and Pinterest are some of the early adopters), but it's worth upgrading now to get ready.

Daily Builds Of Wayland & Weston For Ubuntu Linux

While Canonical may be set on making Mir the default display server across all Ubuntu platforms by this time next year, this isn't stopping others from using Ubuntu for Wayland development and using it as an alternative to Mir or the X.Org Server. Read more Also: Ubuntu Online Summit 15.05 to Start in May