Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

April 2013

Working with Stdin and Stdout

Filed under
Software
HowTos
  • Working with Stdin and Stdout
  • Open Build Service version 2.4 released
  • Please, stay away from rebase
  • Hacking on Ubiquity, the setup
  • "Await" in Python

Ubuntu 13.04 Review – Spot the difference

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 13.04 Review – Spot the difference
  • How to Disable Window Effects in Ubuntu 13.04
  • Xubuntu 13.04 Review: Rock solid and stable
  • 13 Reasons to Deploy With Ubuntu Server
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 314

Poll: Which distros would you save?

Filed under
Linux

everydaylinuxuser.com: One of the comments that is quite often made on Reddit and in other Linux forums is that there are a lot of distributions that are just re-spins of Ubuntu, Fedora, openSUSE etc. Suppose limits, which distributions would you save?

Debian 7.0 Wheezy - my hands on

Filed under
Linux
  • Debian 7.0 Wheezy - my hands on with a pre-release build
  • Lightweight Debian: LXDE Desktop From Scratch
  • Debian developers set to party

why there’s no need for distributions to use the same package format

Filed under
Linux

happyassassin.net: The problem Bryan identifies affects third parties providing Linux applications directly to users: Bryan trying to provide his games to users of different distributions, or Google trying to provide Chrome, or Mozilla trying to provide Firefox, and so on and so forth.

some leftovers:

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • Little Black Box Open Source XBMC Media Centre Unveiled
  • Open Source by Default
  • Raspberry Pi Case by SB Components Review
  • Why Open Source Software is Like Burning Man
  • A change in the open source software market

Compromised Apache binaries

Filed under
Software
  • Compromised Apache binaries load malicious code
  • Doomsday Engine on openSUSE
  • Hotshots – Screenshot tool with editing
  • Vim Sessions
  • rekonq 2.3.0 almost ready
  • Strange Puzzle Game "Kairo" Launches on Steam for Linux
  • another opensuse wallpaper
  • dmesg -H is sexy
  • BitTorrent Sync: Painless File Syncing without the Cloud
  • Useful Gimp Keyboard Shortcuts in Debian/Ubuntu
  • Image annotation in GIMP, Dia, and OpenOffice Draw
  • LibreOffice Happy To Work With Coverity Scan Results
  • Stealth Bastard Deluxe Sneaks Onto Linux thru Steam
  • "The 39 Steps" Will Combine Film and Literature

SolydXK Added to Distrowatch Database

Filed under
Linux
  • SolydXK Added to Distrowatch Database
  • Testing Hardware Compatibility with Knoppix on Asus U80A
  • Linux? What's That?? -- Soon No more
  • Windows Blue & Desktop death nonsense
  • Why you should go to a Linux event
  • Confused by FuSE
  • Linux Tweaks for Samsung 535U3C
  • Once again, Linux Fest Northwest nails it
  • List Of Linux Operating System For Ham Radio Operator
  • The new BeagleBone Black and Gentoo
  • Open build service gets a facelift

Compiling your own custom kernel for fun and profit

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

anarchic-order.blogspot: You know that Linux kernel thing, that has thousands of developers from all over the world, some of which do it professionally, most of which do it for the love of solving problems (or something)? I look at it as a great chance for learning.

More in Tux Machines

Open source Linux-on-Zynq SBC debuts new FPGA add-on standard

Opal Kelly’s “SYZYGY Brain-1” SBC, which runs Linux on a Zynq-7012S, is a proof of concept for its SYZYGY standard for FPGA-driven peripherals. FPGA development firm Opal Kelly has gone to Crowd Supply to launch a development board to showcase its SYZYGY standard for FPGA peripheral expansion. SYZYGY bridges the gap between Digilent’s low-speed Pmod connector and the higher-end VITA 57.1 FMC (FPGA Mezzanine Card) standard. The open source, 110 x 75mm SYZYGY Brain-1 SBC runs Linux on a Xilinx Zynq-7012S SoC, a member of the FPGA-enabled Zynq-7000S family, which offers single Cortex-A9 cores instead of dual dual cores on the Zynq-7000 series. Read more

Why Linux can make you feel thankful or merely stuffed

There are many reasons why I came to appreciate Unix and then Linux and why they became such an important part of my life. These operating systems provided a focus and a career specialty that I've greatly enjoyed. I appreciate Linus Torvalds and the many thousands of developers who have contributed their time and energy into building a powerful, efficient and enjoyable operating system. I appreciate the many tools and commands that make them so easy to use and get my work done. And I appreciate the chances that I've had to share what I've learned with so many others. It's been fun, and it's been very rewarding. Read more

Ubuntu-Based ExLight Linux OS Is One of the Few to Use Latest Enlightenment 0.22

ExLight Build 171121 replaces last week's Build 171112, which used the older Enlightenment 0.20 desktop from the Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) software repositories, to update Enlightenment to the latest 0.22 release that the developer compiled from sources. This makes ExLight one of few distros to use Enlightenment 0.22. "Version 171112 uses Enlightenment 0.20 installed from Ubuntu’s repositories. Build 171121 of ExLight uses Enlightenment 0.22 installed by me from source," said the developer in the release announcement. "Only two Linux distributions in the whole wide world (besides ExLight) use Enlightenment 0.22 as desktop environment." Read more

Ubuntu 17.10 Users Get Major Kernel Update, 20 Security Vulnerabilities Patched

If you're using the latest Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system on your personal computer, you should know that it received it's first major kernel update since the official release back in October 19, 2017. The update addresses a total of 20 security vulnerabilities for Ubuntu 17.10's Linux 4.13 kernel packages, including the Raspberry Pi 2 one. Among the security issues patched in this update, five are related to Linux kernel's USB subsystem, including a use-after-free vulnerability, which could allow a physically proximate attacker to crash the affected system by causing a denial of service (DoS attack) or possibly execute arbitrary code. Other three are related to the ALSA subsystem, including a race condition. Read more