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May 2013

Ubuntu is NOT a Community Project

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxadvocates.com: When Canonical Ltd. chose to create Skunkworks, Ubuntu ceased being a community Distro. If there are gradations between one extreme black (proprietary) and white (community, open source) Ubuntu has moved in the grey scale towards black ever so slightly.

Also: Fork Ubuntu to Preserve Community Participation

One Week With GNOME 3 Classic: Day One

Filed under
Software

sgallagh.wordpres: Over the course of a week, I’m going to be experimenting with the new GNOME Classic desktop in Fedora 19 beta. I will be recording my experiences (hopefully) daily on this blog.

10 Linux Distributions and Their Targeted Users

Filed under
Linux

tecmint.com: This article aims at briefing why a certain distro exist, who are the targeted user of the distro, and what special features it has as compared to its’ counterpart.

Slackpkg Update Fixes Long Standing Annoyance

Filed under
Slack

ostatic.com: Slackware's Slackpkg has long had a design flaw that could result in inoperative applications or systems. But Patrick Volkerding recently addressed the issue with a simple but significant change.

Reinventing Simple

Filed under
Software

linux-magazine.com: The days when Linux applications were small and simple are long gone. With Firefox and LibreOffice installed on most desktops, the community has embraced monster-sized apps so unreservedly that you can sometimes need to look twice to see what operating system you are using. In fact, the complexity has become so great that simplicity is being reinvented again and again -- by adding complexity.

Selecting a distribution is a personal decision

Filed under
Linux

Jon "maddog" Hall: Every time I have been asked, "Which distribution do you use?" I have given a truthful answer: "I use whatever distribution my customers use. It depends on the situation." Typically, that answer is sufficient, but recently someone asked: "Who are your customers? Why is it dependent on customers? There are many 'Linux' (sic) distributions, like Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora, etc. Anyone can choose what he likes."

Review: SolydXK 2013.04.06

Filed under
Linux

dasublogbyprashanth.blogspot: What is SolydXK? Debian-based Linux Mint never had a KDE edition, so SolydK was born out of the unofficial project featuring KDE in Debian-based Linux Mint. Then, Linux Mint pushed its Xfce edition back to an Ubuntu base, necessitating the emergence of SolydX. Together they form SolydXK, based on Debian Testing but with update packs, just as Debian-based Linux Mint is.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Legend of Grimrock Linux Version Released
  • BioShock Infinite Will Not Arrive on Linux
  • Recent Experiments with Konsole
  • Drupal.org compromised
  • Former Microsoft Exec Embraces Linux for Networking Software
  • Abducted brings alien adventure to Linux
  • useful vim plugins & keymaps
  • Linux Thermal Daemon
  • How to install pf-kernel in debian
  • Save time with AWK print
  • Much improved multiple monitor support in Fedora
  • Finger Command To Find User Details
  • Floss Weekly 253
  • TuxRadar: Podcast Season 5 Episode 9
  • TLLTS Episode 507 Released May 29

GNOME 3.10 to Bring New Features

Filed under
Software

Woe is Linux. Woe is Me.

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

pcmag.com: Shuttleworth, the founder of Canonical, publishers of Ubuntu, has given up on the idea that Linux (which Ubuntu is based on) will ever supplant Windows. So what happened? Lots happened and none of it good.

More in Tux Machines

IBM Red Hat vs. SUSE: How do these Linux distributions stack up?

IBM Red Hat and SUSE are the leading vendors in the open source enterprise Linux market, but how do these two builds compare? Learn the history of IBM Red Hat vs. SUSE and compare numerous criteria -- including the architectures each supports and how each distribution addresses the learning curve -- as well as product support offerings, pricing and certifications. Like other Linux distributions, RHEL and SUSE both support a comprehensive set of commands. When comparing these two distributions, it's worth noting that, although some commands are common to all Linux distributions, IBM Red Hat and SUSE also have their own command sets. Additionally, the commands these Linux distributions support tend to evolve over time. [...] Like any Linux distribution, SLES has a significant learning curve, particularly for those who are new to Linux OSes. However, SUSE does offer comprehensive training resources, including online and in-person classes. SLES is sold as a one- or three-year subscription. The subscription cost is based on the number of sockets or VMs, the architecture and the support option the organization selects. A one-year subscription for an x86/x64 OS running on one to two sockets or one to two VMs with Standard support starts at $799. SUSE offers two support options: Standard and Priority. Its Standard support plan includes assistance with software upgrades and updates, as well as unlimited technical support via chat, phone or web. Support is available 12 hours per day, five days per week, with a two-hour response time for Severity 1 issues and a four-hour response time for Severity 2 issues. Read more Also: Simply NUC mini data center > Tux-Techie

LibreOffice 7.1 Layout Updates and "typical errors when creating presentation templates"

  • [LibreOffice 7.1] Layout updates

    You know the LibreOffice community work hard on the LibreOffice 7.1 Christmas release. Did you know that LibreOffice has 7 different UI Layouts? With the next release, our uses will be informed after the installation. Thanks to Heiko for the new dialog.

  • Your typical errors when creating presentation templates. Part 1

    Try click somewhere on slide in area with rectangles. You can select any from these rectangles include the largest grey rectangle that author used as background for all composition. Its all are just shapes! This is an absolutely wrong way when you create a presentation template!

Upgrades, Fedora and IBM Leftovers

Python Programming

  • Public Apology to Jeremy Howard

    We, the NumFOCUS Code of Conduct Enforcement Committee, issue a public apology to Jeremy Howard for our handling of the JupyterCon 2020 reports. We should have done better. We thank you for sharing your experience and we will use it to improve our policies going forward. We acknowledge that it was an extremely stressful experience, being summoned to an interview with several members of a committee, after a week had passed, and without knowing the nature of the complaint. We apologize for causing this stress and will work to improve our process to avoid this from happening in the future. To clarify a crucial miscommunication that we take responsibility for: At the time of the interview, the committee had not determined that there was a violation of the code of conduct, only that there were two complaints filed and being examined. We apologize for not communicating that clearly from the beginning. We have not recommended any enforcement actions. We had asked to postpone the posting of the talk to the JupyterCon shared space until the complaints are resolved. We realize now that we used overly charged language and miscommunicated the stage of the investigation when discussing the complaints, i.e. saying a violation occurred. We should have been clearer saying multiple complaints have been made and the alleged violation investigation had not been resolved.

  • Python Morsels: Data structures contain pointers

    Data structures in Python don't actually contain objects. They references to objects (aka "pointers").

  • Sending Invites - Building SaaS #77 · Matt Layman

    In this episode, I worked on the form that will send invites to users for the new social network app that I’m building. We built the view, the form, and the tests and wired a button to the new view. The first thing that we do was talk through the new changes since the last stream. After discussing the progress, I took some time to cover the expected budget for the application to get it to an MVP. Once we covered the budget, I talked about different strategies for sending invite emails and the tradeoffs between sending email in a request and response cycle versus using background workers.

  • Episode #33: Going Beyond the Basic Stuff With Python and Al Sweigart – The Real Python Podcast

    You probably have heard of the bestselling Python book, “Automate the Boring Stuff with Python.” What are the next steps after starting to dabble in the Python basics? Maybe you’ve completed some tutorials, created a few scripts, and automated repetitive tasks in your life. This week on the show, we have author Al Sweigart to talk about his new book, “Beyond the Basic Stuff with Python: Best Practices for Writing Clean Code.”

  • How to Sort a Dictionary by Value in Python

    A dictionary in Python is a collection of items that stores data as key-value pairs. In Python 3.7 and later versions, dictionaries are sorted by the order of item insertion. In earlier versions, they were unordered. Let's have a look at how we can sort a dictionary on basis of the values they contain.