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August 2013

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Use Google+ Hangouts in Linux Distributions
  • Sync local calendar with Google Calendar in Debian XFCE
  • A little hard disk nostalgia
  • PGP encrypt, decrypt or digitally sign files via GnuPG GUI
  • Doing is Doing – my 10 open source principles
  • py3status v1.0
  • Linux Kernel 3.4.60 LTS Officially Released
  • Full Circle Magazine #76
  • Linux 3.12 To Support AMD "Berlin" HSA APU
  • KDE 4.12 Release Schedule Announced
  • The Demographics Behind DuckDuckGo

Piggydb: A little, interesting digital assistant

Filed under
Software
  • Piggydb: A little, interesting digital assistant
  • Mir Now Has Improved Multi-Monitor Synchronization
  • Spelunky, The Random Platformer Could Come To Linux
  • Eador. Masters Of The Broken World Will Still Come To Linux
  • Tower Of Tiestru, A 3D Tower Defence And Strategy Game
  • caliber: a battleground for function versus form
  • Valve Updates the Original Half-Life Twice in One Month
  • Symphytum, a Personal database for Linux
  • aee: Something for everyone
  • HandBrake & Skype Fedora 20

Use an EOL Kernel

Filed under
Linux
  • Use an EOL Kernel (Gentoo)
  • Retail Shelf-space For GNU/Linux PCs
  • New Kubuntu Dev Tools
  • Linux Mint Monthly News July 2013
  • Slackware 12.* are EOL This Year
  • Ubuntu 13.10 Will Not Have Scopes in Ubuntu Software Center
  • Upgrading the Painless Way with Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization
  • openSUSE Issues and their Resolution by Kernel of the Day
  • OMDV.org Landing Page
  • Experimental Render Nodes Will Be In Linux 3.12
  • Tuxradar Podcast Season 5 Episode 15

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Composite Bypass Support Sharply Bumps XMir's Performance
  • Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Arrives on April 17
  • A Keyboard To Love
  • GNOME’s Web Browser Ditches Google For DuckDuckGo
  • 6 Useful find Command Options In Linux
  • Get a Masters in Open Source technology
  • LightDM Session Locker Reaches 1.0
  • Ubuntu Is Close To Recommending 64-Bit By Default
  • abcm2ps and abcmidi: Coolness I didn’t know existed
  • ImageMagick: batch resize and DPI change
  • Call for Papers: The 10th International Conference on Open Source Systems
  • Open source highlights July
  • Easily Download and Create a USB Linux Distro in Windows
  • Vote, baby, vote! Lubuntu Wallpaper Contest
  • 16 Power Tools For Linux Users
  • Gentoo Hardened progress report
  • Linux Bootloaders
  • Ubuntu Is Going After A New Linux Kernel API
  • What is COPR
  • Software Freedom Day - Cambridge

Darktable vs. Shotwell: Two Great Photo Editing Apps

Filed under
Software

makeuseof.com: Until recently, Linux only had GIMP as an acceptable photo editing tool. That’s changed, thanks to a couple new tools that provide impressive features: Darktable and Shotwell.

The openSUSE Release process

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: To get openSUSE out is a lot of work. We already shared part of what we are doing to keep Factory rolling. But as you can guess, there is much more to it. But let’s pretend it is a simple three-step process:

LibreOffice 4.1.1 Released Fixing 101 Bugs

Filed under
LibO

ostatic.com: Here we go again with another LibreOffice update, this time to the 4.1 branch released last month. LibreOffice 4.1.1 was announced today in Berlin with "a large number of improved interoperability features with proprietary and legacy file formats."

My favourite is KDE. Why? I'm not sure

Filed under
KDE
Linux

linuxblog.darkduck: I'm not sure I have a favourite distribution. But, my favourite desktop environment is KDE.

Mir & XMir Performance

Filed under
Software

samohtv.wordpress: This is the first article in a series of blog posts on Mir’s and XMir’s performance. The idea is to provide further insights into the overall performance work, point out existing bottlenecks and how the team is addressing them.

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Anonymous Open Source Projects
    He made it clear he is not advocating for this view, just a thought experiment. I had, well, a few thoughts on this. I tend to think of open source projects in three broad buckets. Firstly, we have the overall workflow in which the community works together to build things. This is your code review processes, issue management, translations workflow, event strategy, governance, and other pieces. Secondly, there are the individual contributions. This is how we assess what we want to build, what quality looks like, how we build modularity, and other elements. Thirdly, there is identity which covers the identity of the project and the individuals who contribute to it. Solomon taps into this third component.
  • Ostatic and Archphile Are Dead
    I’ve been meaning to write about the demise of Ostatic for a month or so now, but it’s not easy to put together an article when you have absolutely no facts. I first noticed the site was gone a month or so back, when an attempt to reach it turned up one of those “this site can’t be reached” error messages. With a little checking, I was able to verify that the site has indeed gone dark, with writers for the site evidently losing access to their content without notice. Other than that, I’ve been able to find out nothing. Even the site’s ownership is shrouded in mystery. The domain name is registered to OStatic Inc, but with absolutely no information about who’s behind the corporation, which has a listed address of 500 Beale Street in San Francisco. I made an attempt to reach someone using the telephone number included in the results of a “whois” search, but have never received a reply from the voicemail message I left. Back in the days when FOSS Force was first getting cranked up, Ostatic was something of a goto site for news and commentary on Linux and open source. This hasn’t been so true lately, although Susan Linton — the original publisher of Tux Machines — continued to post her informative and entertaining news roundup column on the site until early February — presumably until the end. I’ve reached out to Ms. Linton, hoping to find out more about the demise of Ostatic, but haven’t received a reply. Her column will certainly be missed.
  • This Week In Creative Commons History
    Since I'm here at the Creative Commons 2017 Global Summit this weekend, I want to take a break from our usual Techdirt history posts and highlight the new State Of The Commons report that has been released. These annual reports are a key part of the CC community — here at Techdirt, most of our readers already understand the importance of the free culture licensing options that CC provides to creators, but it's important to step back and look at just how much content is being created and shared thanks to this system. It also provides some good insight into exactly how people are using CC licenses, through both data and (moreso than in previous years) close-up case studies. In the coming week we'll be taking a deeper dive into some of the specifics of the report and this year's summit, but for now I want to highlight a few key points — and encourage you to check out the full report for yourself.
  • ASU’s open-source 'library of the stars' to be enhanced by NSF grant
  • ASU wins record 14 NSF career awards
    Arizona State University has earned 14 National Science Foundation early career faculty awards, ranking second among all university recipients for 2017 and setting an ASU record. The awards total $7 million in funding for the ASU researchers over five years.

R1Soft's Backup Backport, TrustZone CryptoCell in Linux

  • CloudLinux 6 Gets New Beta Kernel to Backport a Fix for R1Soft's Backup Solution
    After announcing earlier this week the availability of a new Beta kernel for CloudLinux 7 and CloudLinux 6 Hybrid users, CloudLinux's Mykola Naugolnyi is now informing us about the release of a Beta kernel for CloudLinux 6 users. The updated CloudLinux 6 Beta kernel is tagged as build 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.26 and it's here to replace kernel 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.25. It is available right now for download from CloudLinux's updates-testing repository and backports a fix (CKSIX-109) for R1Soft's backup solution from CloudLinux 7's kernel.
  • Linux 4.12 To Begin Supporting TrustZone CryptoCell
    The upcoming Linux 4.12 kernel cycle plans to introduce support for CryptoCell hardware within ARM's TrustZone.

Lakka 2.0 stable release!

After 6 months of community testing, we are proud to announce Lakka 2.0! This new version of Lakka is based on LibreELEC instead of OpenELEC. Almost every package has been updated! We are now using RetroArch 1.5.0, which includes so many changes that listing everything in a single blogpost is rather difficult. Read more Also: LibreELEC-Based Lakka 2.0 Officially Released with Raspberry Pi Zero W Support

Leftovers: Gaming