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September 2013

Tales from Linux Kernel 3.11 Development

Filed under
Linux

linuxuser.co.uk: Jon Masters summarises the happenings in the Linux kernel community around the release of the 3.11-rc1 kernel

Open source snapshot: GhostBSD

Filed under
BSD

techworld.com.au: When it comes to open source desktop operating systems, there's no question that Linux is the top dog in terms of market share. But that's not to say that Linux is all there is. Alongside projects like GNU Hurd, Haiku and others, there is the plethora of desktop-targeted operating systems in the BSD family.

A Mac for a Linux user

Filed under
Linux
Mac

manilastandardtoday.com: IN a recent piece for TechRepublic, Jack Wallen, a longtime Linux advocate, contemplates the purchase of an iMac. As a Linux user myself, I can’t help but agree. But unlike Jack, I switched from Windows to both Linux (on the desktop) and the Mac (on the road) at about the same time, so I had none of the doubts that he entertained.

Open source programs to get more kids to code

Filed under
Software

opensource.com: At OSCON this year, Regina ten Bruggencate and Kim Spiritus gave a talk called How To Get More Kids To Code. I got in late (I was waiting in line to get a free signed copy of The Art of Community by Jono Bacon) so I missed the beginning of this session, but came in as they were demoing Scratch.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 527

Filed under
Linux

Welcome to this year's 39th issue of DistroWatch Weekly! This week we talk about some companies who are investing positively in open source in the hope of reaping the rewards. These companies include Valve, a company working on a Linux-based gaming console; NVIDIA, a popular video card manufacturer and Red Hat, a leading developer of enterprise software and sponsor of the Fedora Project.

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Videos about the Freedombox project
  • Turning points and cornerstones 2013
  • Teskeing the Possibilities | BSD Now 4
  • Being on the napkin
  • IBM Releases FusedOS Operating System
  • Temper Pi
  • Open Source Software is Only the Beginning
  • install HPLIP rivers on debian 7.0/7.1
  • Mark My Words, Linux Will Win (w/ steamos)
  • Complex setup with Nvidia Optimus / Nouveau Prime on Fedora 19
  • How to access ssh terminal in web browser on Linux
  • /bin/rm: cannot execute [Argument list too long]
  • TuxRadar: Podcast Season 5 Episode 17

No One Knows What the Firefox Logo is

Filed under
Software
Moz/FF
  • No One Knows What the Firefox Logo is, and Last Night's Jeopardy! Proved It
  • Slides for my talk at LibreOffice conference
  • Resolving Nightmare Bugs With Reversible Linux App Debugger
  • New Firefox 25 Beta Launched on All Available Platforms
  • Frikin’ Awesome Apps (without AppData)
  • GNOME 3.10 in Fedora
  • Pitch Perfect Penguins
  • Nouveau Keeps Pushing Forward With Improvements
  • Getting Ready for Mozilla Summit 2013; Fun Already!

Is Slackware Right For You?

Filed under
Linux
  • Is Slackware, The Oldest Remaining Linux Distribution, Right For You?
  • Debian Edu / Skolelinux Wheezy — a solution for your school
  • Torvald’s Diplomacy, Elop’s Riches & More…
  • Fedora Linux 20 Gears Up to Be a Big Data Server
  • Partitioning Tool Parted Magic 2013.09.29 Works with UEFI Secure Boot
  • Red Hat Doesn't See SUSE Linux as a Major Competitive Threat

Ryan Gordon: Linux Viable Gaming Platform

Filed under
Gaming
  • Ryan "icculus" Gordon Says Linux Viable Gaming Platform
  • Valve Reveals Steam Machine Controller
  • Nvidia claims SteamOS partnership
  • Making sense of Valve’s Steam Box

Semplice 5 review – High Hopes

Filed under
Linux

linuxbsdos.com: Sometimes I come across a distribution that looks interesting and I want to see how good it is and whether it brings anything new to the table. That’s why I decided to take a quick look at Semplice, a desktop distribution based on the unstable branch of Debian.

More in Tux Machines

Games: Ostriv, Back to Bed, EVERSPACE, Hiveswap: Act 1

Openwashing and Microsoft FUD

BlueBorne Vulnerability Is Patched in All Supported Ubuntu Releases, Update Now

Canonical released today new kernel updates for all of its supported Ubuntu Linux releases, patching recently discovered security vulnerabilities, including the infamous BlueBorne that exposes billions of Bluetooth devices. The BlueBorne vulnerability (CVE-2017-1000251) appears to affect all supported Ubuntu versions, including Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) up to 16.04.3, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) up to 14.04.5, and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) up to 12.04.5. Read more

Security: Updates, 2017 Linux Security Summit, Software Updates for Embedded Linux and More

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • The 2017 Linux Security Summit
    The past Thursday and Friday was the 2017 Linux Security Summit, and once again I think it was a great success. A round of thanks to James Morris for leading the effort, the program committee for selecting a solid set of talks (we saw a big increase in submissions this year), the presenters, the attendees, the Linux Foundation, and our sponsor - thank you all! Unfortunately we don't have recordings of the talks, but I've included my notes on each of the presentations below. I've also included links to the slides, but not all of the slides were available at the time of writing; check the LSS 2017 slide archive for updates.
  • Key Considerations for Software Updates for Embedded Linux and IoT
    The Mirai botnet attack that enslaved poorly secured connected embedded devices is yet another tangible example of the importance of security before bringing your embedded devices online. A new strain of Mirai has caused network outages to about a million Deutsche Telekom customers due to poorly secured routers. Many of these embedded devices run a variant of embedded Linux; typically, the distribution size is around 16MB today. Unfortunately, the Linux kernel, although very widely used, is far from immune to critical security vulnerabilities as well. In fact, in a presentation at Linux Security Summit 2016, Kees Cook highlighted two examples of critical security vulnerabilities in the Linux kernel: one being present in kernel versions from 2.6.1 all the way to 3.15, the other from 3.4 to 3.14. He also showed that a myriad of high severity vulnerabilities are continuously being found and addressed—more than 30 in his data set.
  • APNIC-sponsored proposal could vastly improve DNS resilience against DDoS