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May 2014

32-bit Enterprise Linux Still Matters

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

I've done a lot of support of government servers and they run for about forever, as in until they serve no further use. Even retired, old servers are often repurposed and put back into service due to budget restrictions and/or long lead times to order new equipment under the required procedures for government procurement. In the United States this is especially true at the state level. When a server is repurposed it is usually reloaded with the current enterprise standard Linux distrubution release and applications, not legacy releases. That's one common use case.

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Tails 1.1 Beta 1 Secure Distro Now Has Windows 8 Comouflage Mode

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security
Debian

Tails is a distribution based on Debian and Tor technologies that aims to keep its users as anonymous as possible. It gained a lot more visibility after Edward Snowden said that he used exactly this Linux distribution to hide his tracks. The developers are now implementing more changes and fixes that should ensure it becomes even more secure.

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WebRTC voice and video now available on Firefox Nightly, but…

Filed under
Moz/FF

WebRTC voice and video is now available on Firefox Nightly. That’s the latest news from the Mozilla Foundation and TokBox, the Web communications company that Mozilla Foundation is working with to bring us WebRTC voice and video in my favorite Web browser. To see how this actually works, I decided to download Firefox Nightly and install or run it on my systems.

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Massive NVIDIA 337.25 Linux Driver Massive Update Released, New GPUs Supported

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

The new driver from NVIDIA is quite an impressive one and it covers some new GPU models and numerous bug fixes for various issues and bugs.

NVIDIA has three distinct driver versions that are aimed at various users and products, but this Short Lived Branch is the most updated one. This is where the NVIDIA developers make the first updates for their products and it's also the version that receives improvements for games and applications.

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OpenCL Linux Benchmarks With The Latest Linux GPU Drivers

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

This week there's already been a high-end OpenGL comparison using the latest proprietary drivers with newer AMD Radeon and NVIDIA GeForce graphics cards. Those OpenGL results were followed by a 2D NVIDIA/AMD Linux performance comparison and now to end out the week are some OpenCL compute benchmarks.

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Amarok 2.8.0 Review – A Different Kind of Music Player

Filed under
Reviews

Amarok is one of the most famous music players on the Linux platform and it's been around for more than a decade. It's integrated by default in KDE, which might have contributed to its fame, but it's definitely one of the most interesting alternatives.

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The Dirty List Of GPUs With Open-Source Drivers Gone Wildly Wrong

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

This morning I shared the list of the 60+ graphics cards being tested under Linux for a set of very interesting articles coming up in the days ahead in this massive Linux graphics comparison in celebration of Phoronix.com's 10th birthday next week. While all of the graphics cards were tried, with the open-source drivers there were notable failures with both the AMD Radeon and Nouveau drivers.

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Netbook, Desktop and X Editions of Simplicity Linux 14.7 Alpha 1 Now Available

Filed under
Linux

“Simplicity Linux 14.7 Alpha is now available for download in Netbook, Desktop and X Editions. It is based on Precise Puppy and uses the excellent LXPup by SFS to provide LXDE as a desktop environment for Netbook and Desktop Editions. As usual, Netbook is our cut down version which focuses on web based applications rather than locally installed applications,” said the developer in the official announcement.

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First ideas for a better GNOME browser

Filed under
GNOME

I have tried to describe a situation where Web browsing is more tightly integrated with the desktop. There is still a lot of work to do: detailed functionality needs to be refined, assumptions need to be verified, mockups and prototypes need to be created and evaluated…
A browser is a very complex application to design, but luckily there is a lot of knowledge already available that should help us generate ideas and make informed decisions.

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Sphere 1.4 Is an Icon Pack for People Who Don't Like Flat Operating Systems

Filed under
OS

The Sphere icon pack is made by Achim Karsch and features over 24.000 icons for the operating system, covering pretty much all the known applications out there.

“I really wanted to create another theme, but over the time I'm coming back to my old design Sphere. The most icons, you find in the web, are regtangled designed, looks like iOS design. I want to create something else, something special for linux systems. I think the sphere design looks good and is a opportunity for all those other icons out there.”

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • Handling I/O Bursts With QEMU 2.6
    The recent release of QEMU 2.6 has support for allowing guests to do bursts of I/O for a configurable amount of time, whereby the I/O level exceeds the normally allowed limits. Our friends at the consulting firm Igalia have written a blog post about I/O bursts with QEMU 2.6.
  • Shotwell's New Devs Are Doing a Terrific Job, Facebook Integration Works Again
    Shotwell developer Jens Georg announced earlier, May 23, 2016, the general availability of the first point release in the Shotwell 0.23.x stable series of the popular open-source image viewer and organizer software. Shotwell is being used by default in numerous GNU/Linux operating system, including the widely used Ubuntu, but it was abandoned by its developers from the Yorba Foundation a while ago, during which it didn't receive any attention. At the end of April 2016, a group of open source developers decided to take over the maintenance of Shotwell from where Yorba left off, and we already reported on the release of the major Shotwell 0.23.0 version.
  • FreeIPMI 1.5.2 Released

today's howtos

Red Hat and Fedora

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Apache Elevates TinkerPop Graph Computing Framework to Top Level
    As we've been reporting, The Apache Software Foundation, which incubates more than 350 open source projects and initiatives, has been elevating a lot of interesting new tools to Top-Level Status recently. The foundation has also made clear that you can expect more on this front, as graduating projects to Top-Level Status helps them get both advanced stewardship and certainly far more contributions. Now, the foundation has announced that a project called TinkerPop has graduated from the Apache Incubator to become a Top-Level Project (TLP). TinkerPop is a graph computing framework that provides developers the tools required to build modern graph applications in any application domain and at any scale. "Graph databases and mainstream interest in graph applications have seen tremendous growth in recent years," said Stephen Mallette, Vice President of Apache TinkerPop. "Since its inception in 2009, TinkerPop has been helping to promote that growth with its Open Source graph technology stack. We are excited to now do this same work as a top-level project within the Apache Software Foundation."
  • Why a Buffer developer open sourced his code
    If you look for the official definition of open source, you'll likely stumble upon this outline from the board members of the Open Source Initiative. If you skim through it, you're sure to find some idea or concept that you feel very aligned with. At its heart, openness (and open source) is about free distribution—putting your work out there for others to use. It's really about helping others and giving back. ​When we started to think about open source and how we could implement it at Buffer, the fit seemed not only natural, but crucial to how we operate. In fact, it seemed that in a lot of ways we'd be doing ourselves a disservice if we didn't start to look more seriously at it. But what I didn't quite realize at the time were all the effects that open source would have on me.
  • How to make a culture change at your company
    I attended an interesting talk by Barry O'Reilly at the Cultivate pre-conference at OSCON 2016 about "how to push through change in an enterprise." Though I think the title should have been: "What the enterprise can learn from open source."
  • Two OSCON Conversations, And A Trip Report Between Them
    My last visit to OSCON was in 2011, when I had worked for the Wikimedia Foundation for under a year, and wanted to build and strengthen relationships with the MediaWiki and PHP communities. I remember not feeling very successful, and thinking that this was a conference where executives and engineers (who in many cases are not terribly emotionally passionate about open source) meet to hire, get hired, and sell each other things.
  • Struggling to open a document or photo? Here’s how to do it
    Things are a bit trickier if you have a file from a productivity application you don’t have access to —such as a Word document and no Word application, either to open it or re-save it. The solution is still simple, though — download Libre Office. Libre Office is a free and fully functional office suite that’s more than a match for Microsoft Office, and it can open (and save in) Office file formats.
  • OpenBSD/loongson on the Lemote Yeeloong 8101B
    After hunting for Loongson based hardware for the first half of 2015, I was finally able to find an used Yeeloong in July, in very good condition. Upon receiving the parcel, the first thing I did was to install OpenBSD on this exquisitely exotic machine.
  • Call for GIMP 2.10 Documentation Update
    With the upcoming GIMP 2.10 release we intend to finally close the time gap between releases of source code, installers, and the user manual. This means that we need a more coordinated effort between the GIMP developers team and the GIMP User Manual team. For the past several months we’ve already been working on GIMP mostly in bugfix mode. It’s time to start updating the user manual to match all the changes in GIMP 2.10, and we would appreciate your help with that.
  • Mobile Age project: making senior citizens benefit from open government data
    On 1 February 2016, ten European partners launched the Mobile Age project. Aiming to develop inclusive mobile access to public services using open government data, Mobile Age targets a group of citizens that are usually marginalised when it comes to technical innovations but which is rapidly growing in number and expectations: European senior citizens. While more and more public services are made available online only, older persons’ needs and wishes towards digital services are rarely understood and taken in account. This deficit is often exacerbated by their lower digital skills and poor access to the internet. In order to cope with this, Mobile Age is based on the concept of co-creation: it will develop mobile open government services that are created together with senior citizens.
  • Protecting IP in a 3D printed future
    3D printing might just change everything. At least John Hornick, who leads Finnegan’s 3D printing working group and wrote 3D Printing Will Rock the World, certainly thinks so. Introduced by Bracewell Giuliani’s Erin Hennessy, Hornick spoke to INTA registrants yesterday morning about the dramatic consequences he believes the proliferation of 3D printing could have for intellectual property.