Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

September 2014

FPGA-enabled vision system uses USB3 cams, runs Linux

Filed under
Linux

NI unveiled a fanless, rugged vision computer that runs NI Linux on a quad-core Atom E3845, and offers an FPGA and support for 350MB/s USB3 Vision cameras.

National Instruments (NI) has delivered its NI Linux Real-Time OS on a variety of embedded industrial computers and control systems, including its recent CompactRIO 4-slot Performance Controller. Now, the company is applying NI Linux to machine vision with its new USB3 Vision compatible NI CVS-1459RT.

Read more

Fedora Might Try A New Scheduling Strategy For Its Releases

Filed under
Red Hat

It's no secret that Fedora has had a challenging time sticking to their release schedules for a long time. With taking care of blocker bugs, Fedora Linux releases tend to frequently slip -- with Fedora 21 it's about two months behind schedule and we're just past the alpha stage. By the time Fedora 21 actually ships, Fedora 20 will have been at least twelve months old. However, a new release scheduling strategy might be tried starting with Fedora 22.

Read more

Debian Jessie Might Get Rid Of The kFreeBSD Port

Filed under
Debian
BSD

For years there's been the Debian GNU/kFreeBSD port that ships the same Debian GNU user-land as Debian GNU/Linux but replaces the Linux kernel with that of the FreeBSD kernel.

Read more

Small firms and open-source software put Spine back into NHS after IT fiasco

Filed under
OSS

Without the fuss and delays that have plagued so many large government IT projects, a key part of the NHS digital infrastructure was recently migrated and updated in a single weekend.

The collection of applications and directory services known as the Spine connects clinicians, patients and local services to core NHS services such as the GP2GP patient record transfer, the Electronic Prescription Service, patients' Summary Care Records, and the Choose and Book service. More than 250,000 health service staff connect to it every day, sending more than 400m messages each month.

Read more

Scribbleton Has a Ton of Potential

Filed under
Software

Scribbleton is a very infant -- as in alpha -- release of an innovative note-taking app for Linux that provides cross-platform access with Windows and Apple computers.

It creates a personal wiki for storing everything from quick notes to detailed checklists to outlines. It creates links between pages in Scribbleton. Think of this as an easy-to-use database to create links between words, phrases and pages. You can just as easily use Scribbleton to store snippets or volumes of text and quickly locate cross-referenced information.

Read more

Apache Storm is ready for prime time

Filed under
OSS

What do you do when you have terabytes and more of data and you want to work it with in real time? Well, one solution is to turn to Apache Storm.

Read more

Linux Foundation Announces Major Network Functions Virtualization Project

Filed under
Linux

The project is launching with thirty-eight founding companies, including many of the largest IT companies in the world. Importantly, they include not only cloud and service infrastructure vendors, but telecom service providers, developers and end users as well. (Disclosure: my firm and I represent the Linux Foundation and OPNFV).

Read more

AMD Catalyst 14.9 Linux Driver Is Out, Release Disappoints, as Usual

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The AMD developers have announced that a new Catalyst 14.9 Linux driver is now out and that it brings support for a couple of new operating systems and a few bug fixes.

New AMD Linux drivers don't arrive as often as the community wants or needs them and the company doesn't have the best track record in the open source world. As it stands right now, there are two kinds of drivers available to Linux users, one that's open source and another one that's proprietary. Catalyst 14.9 is made by AMD and provides better functionality than the open source one, but it doesn't get updated too often.

Read more

Calibre for Linux Review – The Best App for Anything Related to eBooks

Filed under
Software
Reviews

Calibre is the premiere application on the Linux platform to convert, edit, view, and download eBooks. It has so many features it would be difficult just to count them all, but it's time to take a closer look at this app and see what changed in the years that passed since our last review.

Read more

Operating System U Fails To Live Up To Its Goals

Filed under
GNU
Linux

After launching last month on Kickstarter, the project has turned into a failure and all development has ceased. Operating System U by Andrew Bernstein only raised $1,948 of its $50,000 goal over the month-long period for the OS that claimed numerous advantages over Ubuntu and Windows 8. Andrew then posted, "Unfortunately OS U was unsuccessful. I truly, truly appreciate everyone who backed us, but unfortunately since we where unsuccessful, combined with other circumstances, OS U will not have any more continued development."

Read more

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Linux Kernel and Security: LVM2, Containers, AMD

  • LVM2 Begins Work On Major Changes To Logical Volume Management
    LVM2 as the user-space tools for Logical Volume Management (LVM) on Linux is in the process of going through a big re-work.
  • Containers and Cloud Security
    The idea behind this blog post is to take a new look at how cloud security is measured and what its impact is on the various actors in the cloud ecosystem. From the measurement point of view, we look at the vertical stack: all code that is traversed to provide a service all the way from input web request to database update to output response potentially contains bugs; the bug density is variable for the different components but the more code you traverse the higher your chance of exposure to exploitable vulnerabilities. We’ll call this the Vertical Attack Profile (VAP) of the stack. However, even this axis is too narrow because the primary actors are the cloud tenant and the cloud service provider (CSP). In an IaaS cloud, part of the vertical profile belongs to the tenant (The guest kernel, guest OS and application) and part (the hypervisor and host OS) belong to the CSP. However, the CSP vertical has the additional problem that any exploit in this piece of the stack can be used to jump into either the host itself or any of the other tenant virtual machines running on the host. We’ll call this exploit causing a failure of containment the Horizontal Attack Profile (HAP). We should also note that any Horizontal Security failure is a potentially business destroying event for the CSP, so they care deeply about preventing them. Conversely any exploit occurring in the VAP owned by the Tenant can be seen by the CSP as a tenant only problem and one which the Tenant is responsible for locating and fixing. We correlate size of profile with attack risk, so the large the profile the greater the probability of being exploited.
  • Canonical Releases AMD Microcode Updates for All Ubuntu Users to Fix Spectre V2
    Canonical released a microcode update for all Ubuntu users with AMD processors to address the well-known Spectre security vulnerability. The Spectre microprocessor side-channel vulnerabilities were publicly disclosed earlier this year and discovered to affect billions of devices made in the past two decades. Unearthed by Jann Horn of Google Project Zero, the second variant (CVE-2017-5715) of the Spectre vulnerability is described as a branch target injection attack.

Programming: 5 Pillars of Learning Programming, New Releases of Rust and Git

  • 5 Pillars of Learning Programming
    Learning how to program is hard. I often find that university courses and boot camps miss important aspects of programming and take poor approaches to teaching rookies. I want to share the 5 basic pillars I believe a successful programming course should build upon. As always, I am addressing the context of mainstream web applications. A rookie’s goal is to master the fundamentals of programming and to understand the importance of libraries and frameworks. Advanced topics such as the cloud, operations in general, or build tools should not be part of the curriculum. I am also skeptical when it comes to Design Patterns. They presume experience that beginners never have.
  • The Rust Programming Language Blog: Announcing Rust 1.27
    The Rust team is happy to announce a new version of Rust, 1.27.0. Rust is a systems programming language focused on safety, speed, and concurrency.
  • Rust 1.27 Released With SIMD Improvements
    Most notable to Rust 1.27 is SIMD support via the std::arch module to make use of SIMD (Single Instruction, Multiple Data) instructions directly. Up to now Rust could already make use of LLVM's auto-vectorization support, but this lets Rust developers write SIMD instructions on their own and to allow for the proper Rust code to be executed based upon the CPU at run-time.
  • Git 2.18 Released With Initial Version Of Its New Wire Protocol
    Version 2.18 of the Git distributed revision control system is now available. Arguably most notable about Git 2.18 is the introduction of its new wire protocol "protocol_v2" that is designed to offer much greater performance. This new protocol is designed to be much faster and is already being used at Google and elsewhere due to the significant performance benefits.
  • Git v2.18.0
    The latest feature release Git v2.18.0 is now available at the usual places. It is comprised of 903 non-merge commits since v2.17.0, contributed by 80 people, 24 of which are new faces.

Linux Foundation: Heather Kirksey and the New LF Report

  • Heather Kirksey on Integrating Networking and Cloud Native
    As highlighted in the recent Open Source Jobs Report, cloud and networking skills are in high demand. And, if you want to hear about the latest networking developments, there is no one better to talk with than Heather Kirksey, VP, Community and Ecosystem Development, Networking at The Linux Foundation. Kirksey was the Director of OPNFV before the recent consolidation of several networking-related projects under the new LF Networking umbrella, and I spoke with her to learn more about LF Networking (LFN) and how the initiative is working closely with cloud native technologies. Kirksey explained the reasoning behind the move and expansion of her role. “At OPNFV, we were focused on integration and end-to-end testing across the LFN projects. We had interaction with all of those communities. At the same time, we were separate legal entities, and things like that created more barriers to collaboration. Now, it’s easy to look at them more strategically as a portfolio to facilitate member engagement and deliver solutions to service providers.”
  • Linux Skills Most Wanted: Open Source Jobs Report
    The 2018 Open Source Technology Jobs Report shows rapid growth in the demand for open source technical talent, with Linux skills a must-have requirement for entry-level positions. The seventh annual report from The Linux Foundation and Dice, released Wednesday, identifies Linux coding as the most sought-after open source skill. Linux-based container technology is a close second. The report provides an overview of open source career trends, factors motivating professionals in the industry, and ways employers attract and retain qualified talent. As with the last two open source jobs reports, the focus this year is on all aspects of open source software and is not limited to Linux.