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June 2015

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat Gluster, Ceph storage roadmaps laid out at Red Hat Summit

    During the Red Hat Summit last week, the vendor provided roadmaps for its Ceph and Gluster storage software products including unified management technology and expanded protocol support for Ceph.

    Red Hat demonstrated the new unified capabilities that will allow users to install, manage and monitor Red Hat's Gluster and Ceph storage. Additional capabilities targeted next year for Red Hat Ceph Storage include support for iSCSI and NFS and improved multi-site capabilities, according to Neil Levine, a Red Hat director of product management.

  • Red Hat – Software Partnership Shakes Up Mobile Software Market
  • The open organization on main street
  • Analysts Evaluation on Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Red Hat Inc (NYSE:RHT) a Buy: Oppenheimer

    According to Wall Street, Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) is expected to report earnings per share for the current fiscal quarter of $0.29. This is the consensus mean estimate based on the individual covering sell-side analysts’ reported numbers. The company last reported earnings for the period ending on 2015-05-31 of $0.31.

  • Call for applications for Fedora Diversity Advisor (A Volunteer Position)

    Fedora is a big community that includes contributors and users from many different countries, each with their own experiences and historical backgrounds that contribute to a diverse mix of cultural, educational, and behavioral norms. To continuously create and foster an inclusive environment in the Fedora community, it’s important to respond to the needs of existing contributors and users, and welcome new contributors and users from diverse backgrounds.

  • Post Filtering

    In order to prevent users from being overwhelmed by a fire hose of notifications from the hubs they’re subscribed to and from all the other apps connected to Fedora Hubs, we decided to design a filtering system.

Btrfs In Linux 4.2 Brings Quota Updates, Many Fixes

Filed under
Linux

Adding to the already lengthy list of new features for Linux 4.2 is the Btrfs file-system updates that were sent in today by Facebook's Chris Mason.

The Btrfs file-system update for Linux 4.2 includes sub-volume quota updates, sysfs improvements, device management improvements, and various other changes. In total around 1,700 lines of Btrfs code were touched for this merge window.

Read more

Also: XFS Will Get DAX Support In The Linux 4.2 Kernel

Will Red Hat Enter the Security Market?

Filed under
Red Hat
Security

Security is key part of the open source Linux operating system that Red Hat delivers to its customers. Yet despite the fact that security is baked into the operating system, Red Hat doesn't currently have a separate security offering.

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6 things technical leaders should consider around open-source software

Filed under
OSS

Many organisations have a wide array of open-source applications and code in use today – whether it be at the infrastructure and application layers, or in development frameworks and GitHub repositories.

However, the applications developer and infrastructure teams come under increasing pressure as organisations rush to develop new services for customers, comply with growing amounts of industry regulation, or simply strive to meet the needs of the information generation.

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OpenMandriva 2014.2 and openSUSE 42

Filed under
-s

Today in Linux news Kate Lebedeff announced the release of OpenMandriva Lx 2014.2, a major update to 2014.1 released September 2014 and the first to support UEFI. In other news, Douglas DeMaio announced openSUSE 42, the next release of the gecko emblazoned Linux due in November. Elsewhere, Jack Germain reviewed Makulu 9 Aero and Alap Naik Desai reported Friday Microsoft hinted at a Linux OS at Microsoft Ignite in Chicago last month.

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Linux as a lifestyle

Filed under
Linux

I'm not going to lie to you, my transformation was not easy. It was a slow and painful process. But after I finished it, it felt like nothing before. Thanks to my stubbornness, I was able to truly embrace open source in my life. I gave some minor contributions to some of the worldly-known open source projects like Reddit and the Tor Project. I'm constantly writing about my open source experience on my blog. I started contributing to Opensource.com and to free software magazine written in Serbian language. I even became a guest blogger to a couple of blogs related to open source and IT in general.

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Plasma 5.3.2 Fixes Your Shutdown Scripts

Filed under
KDE

Tuesday, 30 June 2015. Today KDE releases a bugfix update to Plasma 5, versioned 5.3.2. Plasma 5.3 was released in April with many feature refinements and new modules to complete the desktop experience.

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More KDE:

  • KStars GSoC 2015 Project

    This year marks my first year as a Google Summer of Code (GSoC) mentor, and it has been an exciting experience thus far. I have been a KStars developer for the last 12 years and it is amazing what KStars has accomplished in all those years.

  • Interview with Livio Fania

    Krita is by far the most complete digital painting tool developed on Linux.

  • GSoC Midterm Update

StackEngine's Boyd Hemphill: How Docker is Changing DevOps

Filed under
Linux
Server

“Docker is Linux containers for mere mortals,” Boyd Hemphill is fond of saying. The Director of Evangelism at container application management startup StackEngine organizes Docker Austin meetups, DevOps Days Austin and Container Days events. He has recently given a number of Docker 101 workshops around the country aimed at introducing DevOps professionals to the business advantages of embracing containers and the disposable development environments that they enable.

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The Problem With Putting All the World’s Code in GitHub

Filed under
OSS

The ancient Library of Alexandria may have been the largest collection of human knowledge in its time, and scholars still mourn its destruction. The risk of so devastating a loss diminished somewhat with the advent of the printing press and further still with the rise of the Internet. Yet centralized repositories of specialized information remain, as does the threat of a catastrophic loss.

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More in Tux Machines

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

  • Secure your Kubernetes secrets with smart cards and libssh

    In computer security, software implementations of cryptographic algorithms are vulnerable to side-channel attacks. This type of attack seeks to glean information from the computer system rather than from the program that it is running. As examples, Spectre and Meltdown are both side-channel attacks that target the microarchitecture of modern processors. Microarchitecture attacks are only a subset of all side-channel attacks. There are many others. An attacker who is able to access unauthorized regions in memory can discover private or sensitive information, including authentication secrets. A question that naturally follows is, “Where can I safely store my secrets?” One way to protect your Kubernetes or Red Hat OpenShift secrets is to store them in a hardware token. A hardware token physically separates your secret key from the host machine and the applications that it is running. You can use secret keys stored on smart cards or cryptographic tokens to authenticate to server-side applications. This article introduces Public Key Cryptography Standard #11 (PKCS #11), which you can use to uniquely identify objects stored in tokens. I show you how to build and use libssh with support for PKCS #11 and how to use curl to store and retrieve tokens through the secure shell (SSH) protocol.

  • IBM Advance Toolchain for Linux on Power 14.0-1 released!

    A new update release for the 14.0 series of the IBM® Advance Toolchain for Linux on Power is now available.

  • China Mobile Communications Corporation Internet, China National Offshore Oil Corporation and GREE Group Named Winners of the Red Hat APAC Innovation Awards 2020 for China

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced the winners of the Red Hat APAC Innovation Awards 2020 for China. China Mobile Communications Corporation Internet, China National Offshore Oil Corporation and GREE Group were honored at the Red Hat Forum China 2020 today for their exceptional and innovative use of Red Hat solutions.

Programming Leftovers

  • PyTorch 1.7.0 Now Available - Exxact

    PyTorch is a widely used, open source deep learning platform used for easily writing neural network layers in Python enabling a seamless workflow from research to production. Based on Torch, PyTorch has become a powerful machine learning framework favored by esteemed researchers around the world. The newest stable release of PyTorch, version 1.7.0, has a number of new highlights including  CUDA 11, New APIs for FFTs, Windows support for Distributed training and more.

  • Stefan Scherfke: Raise … from … in Python
  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #444 (Oct. 27, 2020)
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  • Program in Arm6 assembly language on a Raspberry Pi | Opensource.com

    Assembly language offers special insights into how machines work and how they can be programmed.

  • How JavaScript became a serious programming language

    JavaScript's humble start began in 1995, when it was created in just 10 days by Brendan Eich, then an employee with Netscape Communications Corporation. JavaScript has come a long way since then, from a tool to make websites pretty to a serious programming language. In its early days, JavaScript was considered a visual tool that made websites a little more fun and attractive. Languages like Jakarta Server Pages (JSP; formerly JavaServer Pages) used to do all the heavy lifting on rendered web pages, and JavaScript was used to create basic interactions, visual enhancements, and animations. For a long time, the demarcations between HTML, CSS, and JavaScript were not clear. Frontend development primarily consists of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, forming a "layer cake" of standard web technologies.

Making Linux More Like Windows

  • Collabora's Work On Extending The Linux Kernel To Better Support Windows Gaming - Phoronix

    Windows gaming on Linux got some love this week at the Linux Foundation's Open-Source Summit Europe virtual event. In particular, a recap of the work that's been done so far on extending the Linux kernel to better support Wine / Steam Play based support for Windows games running on Linux.  Gabriel Krisman Bertazi as an engineer for consulting firm Collabora talked about their work in recent years on improving the Linux kernel for supporting Valve's needs around running Windows games on Linux with Steam Play. Collabora has been one of Valve's partners for this effort along with CodeWeavers and Valve employing various developers on improving the Linux graphics stack, etc. 

  • Collabora expect their Linux Kernel work for Windows game emulation in Kernel 5.11

    Collabora have been doing presentations during the Open Source Summit, with one particular talk from Gabriel Krisman Bertazi on the "State of Linux Gaming" being quite interesting. While there has been a lot of progress with the Windows compatibility layers Wine and Valve's fork Proton (part of Steam Play), there's still plenty of areas currently lacking and needing work. Collabora is one company extending the Linux Kernel to improve Linux gaming with these compatibility layers, thanks to Valve sponsoring the work. One of the big missing pieces of the pie is supporting the likes of anti-cheat and DRM, with anti-cheat especially causing all sorts of problems entirely breaking lots of Windows games in Wine and Proton. The State of Linux Gaming talk was mostly going over what anyone following would already know, as the event isn't aimed at your typical Linux gaming enthusiast. However, it was still an interesting talk to follow. Thanks to The Linux Foundation, I was able to attend and listen to the talk (the online event requires a ticket purchase) but I've been told by my Collabora contact that they will all eventually be up on their own YouTube Channel which could be as soon as early next week for anyone to be able to view. If you want a brief overview, you can find the slides here from the event schedule. One of the key points that Gabriel Krisman Bertazi went over is their work on system call emulation, which is now required because DRM and anti-cheat tech "are issuing system calls directly from the Windows game code and that bypasses Wine because Wine is not a sandbox" and Wine currently cannot capture those system calls needed which ends up causing games to crash.

today's howtos

  • OpenVPN as default gateway on OpenBSD

    If you plan to use an OpenVPN tunnel to reach your default gateway, which would make the tun interface in the egress group, and use tun0 in your pf.conf which is loaded before OpenVPN starts?

    Here are the few tips I use to solve the problems.

  • How to Setup a Firewall with UFW on Ubuntu 20.04 - Linux Concept

    Nowadays, a Firewall is an essential utility and property of any system for security; by default Ubuntu Operating system having a firewall configuration tool named UFW (Uncomplicated Firewall). UFW is a user-friendly front-end tool to manage iptables firewall rules. It provides you more straightforward methods to manage iptables as the name of this tool start from Uncomplicated.

  • Install Ubuntu on a USB Hard Drive | Pen Drive Linux

    How to Install Ubuntu on a USB hard drive using live media. Believe it or not, creating a completely Portable Ubuntu Installation on USB is a relatively simple process. As a matter of fact, it's almost as simple as a regular Ubuntu internal hard drive installation. Due to popular demand, we have decided to write a simple tutorial on the full Ubuntu USB hard drive installation procedure. So go grab an available external USB hard drive and a nice cold beverage and lets get started.

  • Best Tools to Create a Bootable Linux USB Drive

    Unlike Windows, Linux distributions require a third-party tool to create a bootable USB. It is particularly handy with modern PCs which have done away with the old DVD-drives. Also, installation DVDs were quite delicate and would scratch or in worst-case scenarios, break apart under stress. This guide covers some of the best tools that you can use to create a bootable Linux USB drive.

  • 5 new sudo features you need to know in 2020 | Opensource.com

    When you want to perform an action on a POSIX system, one of the safest ways to do so is to use the sudo command. Unlike logging in as the root user and performing what could be a dangerous action, sudo grants any user designated as a "sudoer" by the sysadmin temporary permission to perform a normally restricted activity. This system has helped keep Linux, Unix, and macOS systems safe from silly mistakes and malicious attacks for decades, and it is the default administrative mechanism on all major Linux distributions today.