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November 2015

uNav GPS Navigation App for Ubuntu Phones Receives a Major Update

Filed under
Ubuntu

Today, November 30, Marcos Costales has just announced a new update for its awesome uNav GPS navigation app for Ubuntu Phone devices, a release that introduces some interesting new features.

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Watch: Ubuntu 16.04 LTS with Unity 8 Gets a New and Beautiful Official Theme

Filed under
Ubuntu

The next Ubuntu desktop with Unity 8 cannot launch with the same theme as the old Unity 7, although that seemed like the case, until now at least. The team has finally changed the theme for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS with Unity 8, and it looks really, really good.

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Enlightenment 0.20 Arrives With Full Wayland Support & Better FreeBSD Support

Filed under
Linux

Today marks the surprise release of Enlightenment 0.20! The E20 development cycle has taken more than a year and saw more than 1,890 patches merged.

The prominent features of Enlightenment 0.20 include full Wayland support, new screen management infrastructure and dialogs, new audio mixer infrastructure, internal widgets being replaced with Elementary, improved FreeBSD support, and a new Geolocation module.

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Linux Mint 17.3 "Rosa" Is Now Available for Download - Screenshot Tour

Filed under
Linux

After a couple of months of hard work, the crew behind the Linux Mint project has pushed today, November 30, 2015, the final builds of the Linux Mint 17.3 (Rosa) computer operating system.

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Turris Omnia is an open source router for security-minded geeks

Filed under
OSS

The Turris Omnia is different from most other routers in a number of ways. The biggest — and coolest — is that it ships with an OpenWrt-based OS that lets you hack it to do just about anything you could do with a desktop Linux system. Use the integrated virtual server for anything you want, like an OwnCloud or Tonido instance or an encrypted chat host.

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OS X 10.11 El Capitan vs. Fedora 23 Linux Performance

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Follow-up tests on this MacBook Air are likely to happen with Ubuntu and potentially other Linux distributions too. There will also be more tests to come; with OS X El Capitan, some of the PTS test profiles that formerly worked on OS X weren't working on this new release and so those additional benchmarks will come later on.

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Ubuntu's Mainline Kernel Archive Finally Has Working Linux 4.4 Kernels

Filed under
Ubuntu

After failing to build working kernels for the past few weeks, the Ubuntu Mainline Kernel PPA is finally offering working daily Linux kernel builds.

Today's kernel build following Linux 4.4-rc3 is the first since the release candidates began to have a successful build of Linux 4.4. All the builds up to now were borked due to a Lustre/LNET dependency issue.

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IBM latest to open source AI program

Filed under
OSS

Thomas said IBM has another reason to open-source its machine learning code – it helps the company recruit new AI experts, which are currently in great demand.

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Camunda BPM 7.4: Camunda Releases Latest Version of its Open Source Software

Filed under
OSS

Besides this, the new Camunda Modeler is an open source tool for creating BPMN diagrams. It is based on the well-known project bpmn.io and targets business users as well as software developers.

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8 projects with LEGO: plastic bricks meet open source

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OSS

LEGO bricks: To a parent, they're a virtual minefield, hidden away in the carpet to inflict unimaginable pain from a seemly innocent barefoot step. But to a child, they are a tool for creatively engineering anything the mind can imagine. And for many, they are our first foray into open source. The instructions with a LEGO set start out as rigid rules, and become merely guidelines as children learn to remix, adapt, and extend the "code" which defines the object being built, and then be shared with anyone nearby.

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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: Nouveau, Mesa and VESA

  • Nouveau Gets ARB_bindless_texture Support For Maxwell & Newer
    Back for Mesa 18.0 there was OpenGL bindless textures for Kepler GPUs on the open-source NVIDIA "Nouveau" driver while now for Mesa 18.1 that support is in place for Maxwell GPUs and newer. Bindless texture support is important for "AZDO" purposes for approaching zero driver overhead with OpenGL. ARB_bindless_texture reduces the API/GL driver overhead of resource bindings and allows accessing textures without needing to first bind/re-bind them.
  • Marek Working Towards Even Lower SGPR Register Usage
    Yesterday well known open-source AMD developer Marek Olšák landed his RadeonSI 32-bit pointers support for freeing up some scalar general purpose registers (SGPRs) and he's continued with a new patch series to alleviate register usage even more.
  • Libdrm 2.4.90 Released With Meson Build System, AMDGPU & Intel Improvements
    Marek Olšák on Saturday released the big libdrm 2.4.90 DRM library update that sits between Mesa and other GPU user-space components and the kernel's Direct Rendering Manager code.
  • Mesa Git Lands RadeonSI 32-bit Pointers Support
    At the start of the new year Marek Olšák of AMD posted a set of patches for 32-bit GPU pointers in RadeonSI. That work has now landed in mainline Mesa Git.
  • xf86-video-vesa 2.4.0
    Nothing terribly exciting, but enough bug fixes to justify a release.
  • VESA X.Org Driver Sees First Update In Three Years
    Should you find yourself using the xf86-video-vesa DDX for one reason or another, a new release is now available and it's the first in three years. The xf86-video-vesa 2.4.0 X.Org driver was released this week with the handful of commits that came in since v2.3.4 was tagged three years ago, it's been eight years already since xf86-video-vesa 2.3.0. For most users, xf86-video-vesa is just used in select fallback instances when your main DDX driver fails but even still these days KMS is pretty solid with xf86-video-modesetting, fbdev and other DDX drivers working well, etc.

Kernel: VGA_Switcheroo, Con Kolivas/MuQSS, and KPTI Protection

Ubuntu: Unity, Mir, and Snapd

  • Ubuntu Touch Q&A 23
    The developers have been hard at work on Xenial! ARM64 now working on Ubuntu Touch, and applications launch! As many modern CPUs don't include 32-bit compatibility mode, ARM64 native mode on UT can start to make use of more modern CPUs.
  • UBports Continues Working On Unity 8, Developer ISO Coming
    While Canonical is no longer involved in Unity 8 development, the community-driven UBports team continues working on their "Unity 8" and "Ubuntu Touch" efforts with a hope to deliver a developer ISO soon. Sadly the Yunit project that also forked Unity 8's code-base doesn't seem to be active at least not regularly anymore, but the UBports team is working on delivering. In their latest Q&A session they share that Unity 8 on the desktop is coming together. One of the developers commented, "While it's both good and pretty, it's not 'pretty good'."
  • This Week In Mir (16th Feb, 2018)
  • Snapd 2.31 Better Supports Wayland Via Mir, Canonical Hires Another Mir Developer
    Besides Mir 0.30 being released this week, other Mir progress was also made by these Canonical developers working on forging Mir into a viable Wayland compositor. Gerry Boland of Canonical's Mir team has shared that Snapd 2.31 now supports any Snap implementing the Wayland interface. This allows for Mir to be shipped as a Snap and support Wayland clients using Canonical's app sandboxing approach alternative to Flatpaks.

Debian: The SysVinit Migration, Debian Debates, and package-hosting repository,

  • The SysVinit upstream project just migrated to git
    Surprising as it might sound, there are still computers using the traditional Sys V init system, and there probably will be until systemd start working on Hurd and FreeBSD. The upstream project still exist, though, and up until today, the upstream source was available from Savannah via subversion. I am happy to report that this just changed.
  • futures of distributions
    Seems Debian is talking about why they are unable to package whole categories of modern software, such as anything using npm. It's good they're having a conversation about that, and I want to give a broader perspective.
  • What is Debian all about, really? Or: friction, packaging complex applications
    This weekend, those interested in Debian development have been having a discussion on the debian-devel mailing list about "What can Debian do to provide complex applications to its users?". I'm commenting on that in my blog rather than the mailing list, since this got a bit too long to be usefully done in an email.
  • Updated my package-repository
    Yesterday I overhauled my Debian package-hosting repository, in response to user-complaints.