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December 2015

The Next Version Of Android Wear Is Being Tested On The Huawei Watch, And It Finally Activates The Speaker

Filed under
Android

Fair play to Huawei for including a speaker on its self-titled Android Wear watch long before the software actually supported it. That being said, I'm sure Huawei Watch owners are wondering when their expensive gadget will have all of its parts activated so they can stop carrying around an extra quarter-ounce of extraneous electronics. According to multiple sources, that speaker will be activated soon, specifically whenever Google gets around to issuing the next version of Android Wear's firmware.

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16 best and worst Android features of 2015

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Android

Like years before it, 2015 saw the release plenty of big-name Android smartphones. Flagships like the Samsung Galaxy S6, LG G4, Motorola Moto X Pure Edition, Sony Xperia Z4/Z5, and the Nexus 6P were all just a few of the great options available to Android fans. While each device brought something new to the table, there was (and always will be) some glaring features missing in every single one.

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Ringing in 2016 with 64 open-spec, hacker friendly SBCs

Filed under
Android
Linux

In 2015, the number of open-spec, hacker friendly single board computers running Linux or Android has continued to grow while prices have dropped to unprecedented levels. Low-cost boards such as the Chip, Raspberry Pi Zero, and Orange Pi PC have set a higher bar for price/performance ratio, while on the high end, we saw the first 64-bit, ARMv8 hacker SBCs arrive at surprisingly low prices. Meanwhile, the board that matters most to makers around the world — the Raspberry Pi — was updated to a Pi 2 model with a modern quad-core, ARMv7 processor that opens up new applications and a wider range of Linux distributions.

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Calculate Linux 15.12 released

Filed under
Linux

We are happy to announce the release of Calculate Linux 15.12.

Calculate Linux Desktop, featuring either the KDE SC 4 (CLD), the MATE (CLDM) or the Xfce (CLDX) environment, Calculate Directory Server (CDS), Calculate Media Center (CMC), Calculate Linux Scratch (CLS) and CLSK with KDE SC 5, Calculate Scratch Server (CSS) are all available for download.

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Don't believe the hype: That GRUB backspace bug wasn't a big deal

Filed under
Linux
Security

You can hack any Linux system just by pressing the backspace key 28 times! That's what some sites would have you believe after an unfortunate GRUB bug was recently made public. But this won't actually allow you to easily own any Linux system.

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Rating KDE Applications: Great to Not too Good

Filed under
KDE

On the Manjaro mail forum, a thread is rating KDE applications into three categories: second to none, decent, and better uninstalled and replaced.

Despite the modern proliferation of desktop environments, such a rating could only be done with GNOME or KDE. No other desktops have encouraged as extensive ecosystems of applications, and, in fact, most modern desktops borrow from GNOME.

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Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • MuseScore 2.0.2 Brings A Bunch Of New Features

    As you may know, MuseScore is an open-source music composition and notation software, allowing the users tp create, edit and print music in an WYSIWYG (what you see is what you get) environment.

  • How software developers helped end the Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone

    A team of open source software developers solved the problem that most urgently needed solving: distributing wages to healthcare workers

  • 2015 at a glance: Open Source Yearbook

    For our first Open Source Yearbook, we reached out to dozens of open source organizations and community members and asked them to contribute articles that help provide a feel for 2015. What were a few of the LibreOffice extensions that stood out in 2015? Which Drupal modules were notable? Which books would publishers highlight if they could only pick a handful from the past year? What did open source wearables and 3D printing look like in 2015? And how in the world could we pick one best couple for our yearbook without offending all the other fabulous open source couples in the world? The 2015 Open Source Yearbook answers all these questions, and many more.

  • Best of Opensource.com: Education
  • LinkedIn reflects on its open-source successes in 2015

    With 2015 coming to an end, LinkedIn Corp. has taken a look back at its year of using, developing and contributing to open-source software.

  • November/December 2015 - Gent and Mexico

    RMS gave his speech "Copyright vs Community" at the Quetelet auditorium, Sint Pietersplein, in Gent, Belgium, on November 17th, to a diverse student audience.

  • Happy GNU Year! Last chance to give in 2015

    Thanks to the free software community's giving, we have already raised more than $250,000 toward our goal of $450,000 by January 31st, 2016. As we look to the new year, we at the Free Software Foundation are feeling optimistic about our plans for 2016.d

  • Glass Half – Brilliant and Hilarious short from the Blender Institute.

    Directed by Beorn Leonard and produced by Ton Roosendaal, Blender’s original founder and chairman of the Blender Foundation, the film is reminiscent in tone of Pixar’s shorts, with the key difference that all assets, including tutorials for some of the techniques used in the film, are free and can be downloaded from Blender’s Cloud storage service.

  • France’s first Digital Law co-created with citizens

    The French draft law Loi Numérique will be presented to the French Parliament on 19 January, after being co-created with citizens through an online public consultation. This is the first law in France resulting from a co-design process.

  • Northern Ireland launches its open data portal

    Northern Ireland has officially launched its open data portal, OpenDataNI, the goal of which is to provide a global platform where public services and all governmental agencies can publish data.

    This CKan-based portal is now accessible through NIDirect, the official governmental portal for Northern Ireland citizens, which states that it provides ‘a single point of access to public sector information and services’.

Gentoo GNU/Linux on PS4

Filed under
Gentoo
  • PS4 Linux Fai0verflow
  • PlayStation 4 Hacked to Run Linux

    The PlayStation 4 and Xbox One systems are just PCs, and now hardware hackers have started doing some very cool things with at least one of these systems. Console-hacking group Fail0verflow has cracked the PlayStation 4 and loaded it up with a version of Linux.

  • Modders hack PS4 to run Linux and Pokemon

    It's been some since we've heard about impressive mods to get game consoles running software and games they're not meant to, but thanks to Failoverflow, a collective of console hackers, there's something new to closeout 2015 with. The group has managed to hack Sony's PlayStation 4 to install the Linux operating system on it, taking advantage of the console's fairly standard PC architecture.

  • PlayStation 4 Has Been Hacked to Run Gentoo Linux

    Believe it or not, it would appear that a hacking group that goes by the name of Fail0verflow managed to hack Sony's PlayStation 4 (PS4) gaming console to run a Linux kernel-based operating system.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • coala platypus

    Although coala’s primary purpose is to make the creation of analysis routines easy, we have taken an effort to include functionality of other open source linters into it. coala can automatically fix the indentation of your Octave files, sort and correct Python imports or add the missing dereferenciation operator to your C++ code (greetings from Clang!) – the list is growing every week. Try running coala with the -A argument to see what we’ve got!

  • Sylpheed 3.5.0 RC2 Brings A Few Bug-Fixes Only
  • Frogr 1.0 (Software For Uploading Photos On Flickr) Has Been Released

    As you may know, Frogr is an open source program that enables the users to easily upgrade photos on Flickr. Among others, it has a simple and clear interface, allows the uploaders to edit the visibility, content type, tags, description and enable/disable global search results in Flickr.

  • Variety 0.5.5 (Open-Source Wallpaping Software) Has Been Released

    As you may know, Variety is an app indicator that changes the desktop wallpaper, using automatically downloaded images from: Wallhaven.cc, Flickr, Wallpapers.net, Desktoppr, NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day.

  • Audacious 3.7.1 Adds Bug-Fixes Only

    Audacious is an open-source music player, having the features of a modern music player, including support for audio effects, equalizer, lyrics and plugins, visualization, support for Winamp skins and support for playlists organized in tabs.

More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (Focal Fossa) Daily Build ISOs Are Now Available to Download

Unveiled last week as the "Focal Fossa" release, the Ubuntu 20.04 LTS operating system will hit the streets next year on April 23rd, as the 8th long-term support version of Ubuntu Linux, one of the most popular Linux-based operating systems in the world. While its development cycle will kick off officially later this week on October 24th, with the toolchain upload, the first daily build ISO images are now already available to download for those who want to test it and report bugs, as well as anyone else who just wants an early taste of Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. Read more

Intel adds 10nm Ice Lake desktop and server CPUs to Linux kernel

The fact that Intel’s Kan Liang has signed off on the addition of Ice Lake desktop and server parts to the Linux kernel does lend a little more credence to Intel’s assertion last week that, despite rumours to the contrary, it would definitely be shipping 10nm desktop processors. Now it looks like those 10nm CPUs might actually come from the Ice Lake family after all. With Intel Comet Lake, its 10-core big-boy, and Hyper-Threading throughout the range, popping up either late this year or early next we had assumed Intel wasn’t going to follow up the mobile release of Ice Lake with any desktop parts. Read more

Programming: Picolibc, NGT, Tryton, OCaml, GNOME and KDE

  • Picolibc Updates (October 2019)

    Tiny stdio in picolibc uses a global variable, __iob, to hold pointers to FILE structs for stdin, stdout, and stderr. For this to point at actual usable functions, applications normally need to create and initialize this themselves. If all you want to do is make sure the tool chain can compile and link a simple program (as is often required for build configuration tools like autotools), then having a simple 'hello world' program actually build successfully can be really useful. I added the 'dummyiob.c' module to picolibc which has an iob variable initialized with suitable functions. If your application doesn't define it's own iob, you'll get this one instead.

  • NGT: A library for high-speed approximate nearest neighbor search

    Different search methods are used for different data types. For example, full-text search is for text data, content-based image retrieval is for images, and relational databases are for data relationships. Deep learning models can easily generate vectors from various kinds of data so that the vector space has embedded relationships among source data. This means that if two source data are similar, the two vectors from the data will be located near each other in the vector space. Therefore, all you have to do is search the vectors instead of the source data. Moreover, the vectors not only represent the text and image characteristics of the source data, but they also represent products, human beings, organizations, and so forth. Therefore, you can search for similar documents and images as well as products with similar attributes, human beings with similar skills, clothing with similar features, and so on. For example, Yahoo! Japan provides a similarity-based fashion-item search using NGT.

  • Tryton Spanish Days 2019: In Alicante on the 27th & 28th of November

    The Tryton Foundation is happy to announce the venue and date of the next Tryton Spanish Days.

  • 6 Excellent Free Books to Learn OCaml

    Caml is a general-purpose, powerful, high-level programming language with a large emphasis on speed and efficiency. A dialect of the ML programming language, it supports functional, imperative, and object-oriented programming styles. Caml has been developed and distributed by INRIA, a French research institute, since 1985. The OCaml system is the main implementation of the Caml language. It has a very strong type-checking system, offers a powerful module system, automatic memory management, first-class functions, and adds a full-fledged object-oriented layer. OCaml includes a native-code compiler supporting numerous architectures, for high performance; a bytecode compiler, for increased portability; and an interactive loop, for experimentation and rapid development. OCaml’s integrated object system allows object-oriented programming without sacrificing the benefits of functional programming, parametric polymorphism, and type inference. The language is mature, producing efficient code and comes with a large set of general purpose as well as domain-specific libraries. OCaml is often used for teaching programming, and by large corporations. OCaml benefits from a whole range of new tools and libraries, including OPAM (package manager), optimizing compilers, and development tools such as TypeRex and Merlin. OCaml was written in 1996 by Xavier Leroy, Jérôme Vouillon, Damien Doligez, and Didier Rémy at INRIA in France.

  • Build win32/win64 nightlies using Gitlab CI

    A week ago after getting Dia nightlies published on GNOME’s new Flatpak nightlies infrastructure I was discussing with Zander Brown, the new maintainer of Dia, of the possibility to publish Windows nightlies through Gitlab the same way we do with Flatpak bundles. A few minutes later I was already trying to cargo-cult what Gedit had to build Windows bundles. It took me a bit of time to figure out how things work, especially that I wanted to make it easier for you to set up a win32/win64 build for your project without much work and as we already use a CI template for Flatpak builds, I ended up doing something pretty similar, but a bit more complex under the hood.

  • Additions and Corrections

    FreeBSD official ports has KDE Frameworks 5.63, Plasma 5.17 and Applications 19.08.2 so it’s right up-to-date with the main KDE releases and it makes a great development platform.

Graphics: Mesa 19.1.8, dGPU and Intel

  • Mesa 19.1.8
    Mesa 19.1.8 is now available.
    
    NOTE: It is anticipated that 19.1.8 will be the final release in the
    19.1 series. Users of 19.1 are encouraged to migrate to the 19.2 series
    in order to obtain future fixes.
    
    Apologies for the big delay in this release; there were several regressions that we
    were investigating, which prevented the pre-release to be on time.
    
    Subject: [ANNOUNCE] mesa 19.1.8
    To: mesa-announce at lists.freedesktop.org
    Cc: mesa-dev at lists.freedesktop.org
    
    Adam Jackson (1):
          docs: Update bug report URLs for the gitlab migration
    
    Alan Coopersmith (5):
          c99_compat.h: Don't try to use 'restrict' in C++ code
          util: Make Solaris implemention of p_atomic_add work with gcc
          util: Workaround lack of flock on Solaris
          meson: recognize "sunos" as the system name for Solaris
          intel/common: include unistd.h for ioctl() prototype on Solaris
    
    Andreas Gottschling (1):
          drisw: Fix shared memory leak on drawable resize
    
    Andres Gomez (3):
          docs: Add the maximum implemented Vulkan API version in 19.1 rel notes
          docs/features: Update VK_KHR_display_swapchain status
          egl: Remove the 565 pbuffer-only EGL config under X11.
    
    Andrii Simiklit (1):
          glsl: disallow incompatible matrices multiplication
    
    Arcady Goldmints-Orlov (1):
          anv: fix descriptor limits on gen8
    
    Bas Nieuwenhuizen (2):
          tu: Set up glsl types.
          radv: Add workaround for hang in The Surge 2.
    
    Danylo Piliaiev (1):
          st/nine: Ignore D3DSIO_RET if it is the last instruction in a shader
    
    Dylan Baker (5):
          meson: fix logic for generating .pc files with old glvnd
          meson: Try finding libxvmcw via pkg-config before using find_library
          meson: Link xvmc with libxv
          meson: gallium media state trackers require libdrm with x11
          meson: Only error building gallium video without libdrm when the platform is drm
    
    Eric Engestrom (4):
          gl: drop incorrect pkg-config file for glvnd
          meson: re-add incorrect pkg-config files with GLVND for backward compatibility
          util/anon_file: add missing #include
          util/anon_file: const string param
    
    Erik Faye-Lund (1):
          glsl: correct bitcast-helpers
    
    Greg V (1):
          util: add anon_file.h for all memfd/temp file usage
    
    Haihao Xiang (1):
          i965: support AYUV/XYUV for external import only
    
    Hal Gentz (1):
          gallium/osmesa: Fix the inability to set no context as current.
    
    Jason Ekstrand (2):
          nir/repair_ssa: Replace the unreachable check with the phi builder
          intel/fs: Fix fs_inst::flags_read for ANY/ALL predicates
    
    Juan A. Suarez Romero (12):
          docs: add sha256 checksums for 19.1.7
          cherry-ignore: add explicit 19.2 only nominations
          cherry-ignore: add explicit 19.3 only nominations
          Revert "Revert "intel/fs: Move the scalar-region conversion to the generator.""
          cherry-ignore: Revert "gallium: remove PIPE_CAP_TEXTURE_SHADOW_MAP"
          bin/get-pick-list.sh: sha1 commits can be smaller than 8 chars
          cherry-ignore: nir/opt_large_constants: Handle store writemasks
          cherry-ignore: util: added missing headers in anon-file
          cherry-ignore: radv: Fix condition for skipping the continue CS.
          cherry-ignore: Revert "radv: disable viewport clamping even if FS doesn't write Z"
          Update version to 19.1.8
          docs: add release notes for 19.1.8
    
    Ken Mays (1):
          haiku: fix Mesa build
    
    Kenneth Graunke (4):
          iris: Initialize ice->state.prim_mode to an invalid value
          intel: Increase Gen11 compute shader scratch IDs to 64.
          iris: Disable CCS_E for 32-bit floating point textures.
          iris: Fix iris_rebind_buffer() for VBOs with non-zero offsets.
    
    Lionel Landwerlin (5):
          anv: gem-stubs: return a valid fd got anv_gem_userptr()
          intel: use proper label for Comet Lake skus
          mesa: don't forget to clear _Layer field on texture unit
          intel: fix subslice computation from topology data
          intel/isl: Set null surface format to R32_UINT
    
    Marek Olšák (1):
          gallium/vl: don't set PIPE_HANDLE_USAGE_EXPLICIT_FLUSH
    
    Matt Turner (1):
          util: Drop preprocessor guards for glibc-2.12
    
    Michel Dänzer (1):
          radeonsi: fix VAAPI segfault due to various bugs
    
    Michel Zou (2):
          scons: add py3 support
          scons: For MinGW use -posix flag.
    
    Paulo Zanoni (1):
          intel/fs: fix SHADER_OPCODE_CLUSTER_BROADCAST for SIMD32
    
    Prodea Alexandru-Liviu (1):
          scons/MSYS2-MinGW-W64: Fix build options defaults
    
    Rhys Perry (2):
          radv: always emit a position export in gs copy shaders
          nir/opt_remove_phis: handle phis with no sources
    
    Samuel Iglesias Gonsálvez (1):
          intel/nir: do not apply the fsin and fcos trig workarounds for consts
    
    Stephen Barber (1):
          nouveau: add idep_nir_headers as dep for libnouveau
    
    Tapani Pälli (3):
          iris: close screen fd on iris_destroy_screen
          egl: check for NULL value like eglGetSyncAttribKHR does
          util: fix os_create_anonymous_file on android
    
    pal1000 (2):
          scons/windows: Support build with LLVM 9.
          scons: Fix MSYS2 Mingw-w64 build.
    
    git tag: mesa-19.1.8
    
  • Mesa 19.1.8 Released To End Out The Series

    More than one month has passed since Mesa 19.1.7 compared to the usual bi-weekly release cadence, but on Monday following the closure of remaining blocker bugs, Mesa 19.1.8 was released that also ends out this release series. Mesa 19.1.8 is the last planned release in the 19.1 Q2 series with users now being encouraged to upgrade at least to the stable Mesa 19.2 while Mesa 19.3 should be out around early December.

  • Linux 5.5 To Restore Power-Savings For Hybrid Laptops When Not Using The dGPU

    On recent kernels when using a laptop with hybrid graphics but not running with the discrete GPU graphics enabled, a regression meant the dGPU never got powered off... Fortunately, for Linux 5.5 -- and potentially to be back-ported after that -- is a change to restore that power-savings. A change enabling NVIDIA HDA controller support inadvertently left dGPUs powered up when not in use, i.e. where the dGPU is not bound to a driver. When the NVIDIA discrete graphics aren't bound to a driver, the power saving path wasn't being hit where the platform power management could disable power to the GPU.

  • Intel Lands More Graphics Code For Linux 5.5 - Jasper, More Intel Xe Multi-GPU Prepping

    Intel's open-source developers kicked off a new week by sending in their latest vetted changes to DRM-Next ahead of next month's Linux 5.5 kernel cycle. They already have sent in a lot of new graphics driver code for Linux 5.5 particularly around Tiger Lake while this week's pull request contains more new hardware enablement. They also anticipate sending in another pull request next week to DRM-Next with any other lingering feature work they are hoping to get into Linux 5.5.

  • Intel's Graphics Compiler For Their NEO Compute Stack Now Supports Jasper Lake

    The team maintaining the LLVM-based Intel Graphics Compiler as part of their "NEO" OpenCL/Compute Stack have rolled out v1.0.2714 that includes initial support for Jasper Lake among other improvements. Just in the past week we've begun seeing Linux graphics driver patches around "Jasper Lake" and that initial kernel-side support coming for Linux 5.5. Jasper Lake is the rumored 10nm successor to Gemini Lake for low-power SoCs but not to be confused with Elkhart Lake that is Tremont+Gen11 also for ultra-low-power environments based upon the limited information thus far.