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January 2016

Mythbuntu Devs Need Your Help to Find a New MythTV Theme for the OS

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Remember Mythbuntu? Yeah, it has been a while since we've shared something here about the MythTV-based official Ubuntu Linux flavor, as they've decided a long time ago not to participate in regular releases of Ubuntu.

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What’s going on with GNOME To Do

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Aye folks! Since a few weeks ago, GNOME To Do saw quite a big number of changes. As some of you may not be strict git followers, a good review of the latest changes may come in handy. Let’s go!

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Linux 4.4.1

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I'm announcing the release of the 4.4.1 kernel.

All users of the 4.4 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 4.4.y git tree can be found at:
git:// linux-4.4.y
and can be browsed at the normal git web browser:


greg k-h

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Also: Linux 4.3.5

Linux 4.1.17

KDevelop 5.0 Beta 2 and 4.7.3 Releases!

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Hey all!

I have the pleasure to announce the releases of two new KDevelop versions:

On one hand, there is the new and shiny KDevelop 5.0 Beta 2 release, which brings us much closer to a final release. Tons of issues have been resolved, many features got polished, and even our UI cleaned up a bit here and there. And did I mention impoved OS X and Windows support? See here for more:

Besides this new beta release, which is where most of our effort went into, I am also happy to announce KDevelop 4.7.3, a new bugfix release of our latest stable KDE 4 based KDevelop. Several annoying problems are resolved now, see the announcement for more information:

Many thanks to everyone involved!


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Watch: Ubuntu MATE Linux Operating System Running on NanoPi 2 SBC

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Chinese SBC seller FriendlyARM published a new video on their YouTube account to show us that the Ubuntu MATE operating system runs flawlessly on the NanoPi 2 single-board computer attached to a capacitive touch LCD.

We saw Ubuntu MATE running on many devices, but this would be the first time when we see it used on this very interesting setup, a cool NanoPi 2 SBC connected to a capacitive touch LCD via HDMI output. The Inernet connection is provided via the built-in Wi-Fi module.

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Linux Kernel 4.4 LTS Gets Its First Point Release, Adds PPC, x86 and ARM64 Fixes

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It is finally here! The first point release of the Linux 4.4 LTS kernel series, which was announced by Linus Torvalds on January 10, 2016, arrives today for GNU/Linux distributions that already adopted it.

Linux kernel 4.4.1 LTS is a fairly normal maintenance build that promises to address various issues with the x86, AMR64 (AArch64), and PPC (PowerPC) hardware architectures, updates a few USB and networking drivers (mostly Ethernet), adds multiple sound enhancements, and improves the networking stack, especially for things like B.A.T.M.A.N. Advanced, Open vSwitch, IPv6, IPv4, Phonet, SCTP (Stream Control Transmission Protocol), as well as XFRM.

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Android Leftovers

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today's leftovers

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  • CoreOS Overview, Part One

    CoreOS is an important part of many container stacks. In this series of posts, we’re going to take a look at CoreOS, why it’s important, and how it works. If you don’t know anything about CoreOS already, don’t worry. We start at the beginning.

  • First Point Release of OpenELEC 6.0 Solves Issues for Raspberry Pi 2 Users

    The developers of the OpenELEC (Open Embedded Linux Entertainment Center) open-source and cross-platform media center operating system announced today, January 30, the release of OpenELEC 6.0.1.

  • Arch Linux Releases Pacman 5.0

    The Arch Linux crew has announced the release of their Pacman 5.0 package manager.

  • Ubuntu 16.04 Alpha 2 Released, Available to Download

    Today sees the second alpha release of the Ubuntu 16.04 development cycle made available to download.

    Alpha 2 arrives a day later than originally planned, and sees just three flavors release builds as part of the milestone.

    Xubuntu, Ubuntu GNOME and Kubuntu sit this alpha out. Why? To paraphrase a recent comment from a Kubuntu dev: “There’s simply nothing to test yet.”

  • Skype for Linux - A Good Microsoft App for Linux [Ed: very bad, very dangerous]

    Skype for Linux is a video chat and voice call application made by Microsoft that happens to have a Linux build as well. Let's take a closer look at what Microsoft is doing for Linux users.

AMD and Intel Graphics

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  • Running The Radeon R7 260X With The Experimental AMDGPU Driver

    A few days back I showed the Radeon vs. AMDGPU vs. Catalyst kernel driver potential when testing on the R9 290 "Hawaii" graphics card that has experimental and disabled-by-default support for the new AMDGPU kernel driver primarily designed for AMD GCN 1.2 GPUs and newer. Those results were interesting and showed some areas where AMDGPU came out faster than Radeon, so I decided to run experimental tests on another GCN 1.1 Sea Islands GPU that can be made to work with this kernel driver.

  • Intel Open-Source Developer Talks About Vulkan

    Jason Ekstrand of Intel's Open-Source Technology Center had a main track presentation on Saturday at FOSDEM about Vulkan.

More in Tux Machines

SwagArch 18.02 - U Got Swag?

SwagArch sounds like an interesting concept. The aesthetic side of things is reasonable, although brown as a color and a dark theme make for a tricky choice. The fonts are pretty good overall. But the visual element is the least of the distro's problems. SwagArch 18.02 didn't deliver the basics, and that's what made Dedoimedo sad. Network support plus the clock issue, horrible package management and broken programs, those are things that must work perfectly. Without them, the system has no value. So you do get multimedia support and a few unique apps, however that cannot balance out all the woes and problems that I encountered. All in all, Swag needs a lot more work. Also, it will have a tough time competing with Manjaro and Antergos, which are already established and fairly robust Arch spins. Lastly, it needs to narrow down its focus. The overall integration of elements is pretty weak. Eclectic, jumbled, not really tested. 2/10 for now. Let's see how it evolves. Read more

How Open Source Approach is Impacting Science

Dive into the exciting world of Innovative Science to explore and find out about how the Linux-based Operating System and Open Source are playing a significant role in the major scientific breakthroughs that are taking place in our daily lives. Read more

Programming: Developer Survey, Code That Unmasks, Retaining Newcomers

  • Developers love trendy new languages but earn more with functional programming
    Developer Q&A site Stack Overflow performs an annual survey to find out more about the programmer community, and the latest set of results has just been published.
  • FYI: AI tools can unmask anonymous coders from their binary executables [Ed: Just a kind reminder that if you are e using Microsoft's tools compile source code, there will be surveillance and telemetry in your compiled code]
    Programmers can be potentially identified from the low-level machine-code instructions in their software executables by AI-powered tools. That's according to boffins from Princeton University, Shiftleft, Drexel University, Sophos, and Braunschweig University of Technology, who have described how stylometry can be applied to binary files. That's kinda bad news for people who wish to develop software, such as privacy-protecting apps, anonymously, as this technology can be used to potentially unmask them. It's also kinda good news for crimefighters trying to identify malware authors.
  • How to avoid humiliating newcomers: A guide for advanced developers
    Every year in New York City, a few thousand young men come to town, dress up like Santa Claus, and do a pub crawl. One year during this SantaCon event, I was walking on the sidewalk and minding my own business, when I saw an extraordinary scene. There was a man dressed up in a red hat and red jacket, and he was talking to a homeless man who was sitting in a wheelchair. The homeless man asked Santa Claus, "Can you spare some change?" Santa dug into his pocket and brought out a $5 bill. He hesitated, then gave it to the homeless man. The homeless man put the bill in his pocket. In an instant, something went wrong. Santa yelled at the homeless man, "I gave you $5. I wanted to give you one dollar, but five is the smallest I had, so you oughtta be grateful. This is your lucky day, man. You should at least say thank you!" [...] I still get angry at people on the internet. It happened to me recently, when someone posted a comment on a video I published about Python co-routines. It had taken me months of research and preparation to create this video, and then a newcomer commented, "I want to master python what should I do."

Software: 5 Online Backup Solutions, Lector, Roundcube

  • 5 Online Backup Solutions for Ubuntu Linux
    As the digital age progresses, the amount of data we produce each year is snowballing. There was a time when we could fit all of our personal digital data on a few floppy disks, but many of us now have hundreds of gigabytes, or even terabytes, of photos, videos, music, and documents that we need to backup and protect. Backing up our data locally is essential, but any good backup plan should also include off-site backups. “The Cloud” has promised us unlimited, cheap storage where we can save our ever-growing data. Online cloud backups should be a part of your overall backup plan, but it’s crucial that your data is secure, encrypted, and backed up automatically. Here are a few online backup tools that aim to make cloud backups easy for desktop Linux users.
  • This Qt eBook App for Linux is a Real Page Turner
    Lector a new open-source Qt-based ebook app for Linux desktops. It supports most common DRM-free ebook files, including EPUB, MOBI, and AZW, as well as comic book files in the CBZ or CBR format. In both visuals and in features Lector is something of a page-turner; a desktop ebook reader you can absolutely judge by its cover. So join me as I take a closer look at its features.
  • Roundcube fr_FEM locale 1.3.5
    Roundcube 1.3.5 was released today and with it, I've released version 1.3.5 of my fr_FEM (French gender-neutral) locale. This latest version is actually the first one that can be used with a production version of Roundcube: the first versions I released were based on the latest commit in the master branch at the time instead of an actual release. Not sure why I did that.