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May 2016

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

Linux Devices

Filed under
Linux

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Quantifying Benefits of Network Virtualization in the Data Center

    Modern data centers have increased significantly in scale and complexity as compute and storage resources become highly virtualized. The rise of the DevOps style of application deployment means that data center resources must be agile and respond rapidly to changing workload requirements. Data center network technologies have been challenged to keep up with these rapidly evolving application requirements.

  • Apache Zeppelin Joins Several Other Projects Gaining Top-Level Status

    As we've been reporting, The Apache Software Foundation, which incubates more than 350 open source projects and initiatives, has been elevating a lot of interesting new tools to Top-Level Status recently. The foundation has also made clear that you can expect more on this front, as graduating projects to Top-Level Status helps them get both advanced stewardship and certainly far more contributions.

    Only a few days ago, the foundation announced that a project called TinkerPop has graduated from the Apache Incubator to become a Top-Level Project (TLP). TinkerPop is a graph computing framework that provides developers the tools required to build modern graph applications in any application domain and at any scale. Now, it has announced that Apache Zeppelin has graduated as well. Zeppelin is a web-based notebook that enables interactive data analytics.

  • 6 Open Source Operating Systems for the Internet of Things (IoT)

    Whether you are small to large enterprises, IoT is one of the useful technology that can help you to be connected on-the-go.

  • 6 open source architecture projects to check out

    The world of architecture doesn't change as quickly as software, but architects are still finding new ways to share innovative designs and ideas.

    The open source architecture movement aims to make architectural designs, drawings, 3D renderings, and documentation freely available for integration into other projects under open source licenses. It owes much of its growth to the growing popularity of the maker movement, DIY culture, 3D printing, and CNC machines, as well as support from architects like Alejandro Aravana.

  • Yorubaname.com has gone opensource, codebase now on GitHub

    Online dictionary for yoruba names, YorubaName, has now made its backlog accessible to the public. In a post on their blog, the guys at YorubaName announced that the website codebase is now on GitHub.

  • A New Version of Rust Hits the Streets

    Version 1.9 of the Rust programming language has been released. Rust is a new language with a small but enthusiastic community of developers.

  • Here's how you can make a career in OpenStack

    OpenStack is one of the biggest open source movements. It is a free and open-source software platform for cloud computing, mostly deployed as an infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS). The software platform consists of interrelated components that control hardware pools of processing, storage, and networking resources throughout a data centre.

    According to the official website, hundreds of the world's largest brands rely on OpenStack to run their businesses every day, reducing costs and helping them move faster. OpenStack has a strong ecosystem globally.

  • Compatibility before purity: Microsoft tweaks .NET Core again [Ed: Microsoft lied about .NET going Open Source; just forked it into Open Core version]

    Microsoft's open source fork of the .NET platform, called .NET Core, will be modified for better compatibility with existing applications, says Program Manager Immo Landwerth in a recent post.

  • EMC Ships Open Source Tool for Cloud and IoT Devices
  • Watch Benjamin Hindman Co-Creator of Apache Mesos Speak Live Tomorrow at MesosCon [Ed: Microsoft proxy in a sense]
  • MesosCon Preview: Q&A with Twitter’s Chris Pinkham
  • How to secure your open source code [Ed: more marketing nonsense of Black Duck]
  • Luxembourg launches open data portal

    The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg officially launched its national open data portal data.public.lu on April 8th. This portal, supported by Digital Luxembourg, the government agency in charge of digital affairs in the country, was presented during the Game of Code hackathon.

  • Denmark to accelerate government digitisation

    Open standards

    The existing shared solutions are to be adopted by all authorities and public sector institutions where relevant, according to a presentation in English. “Shared solutions need to be stable, secure and user-friendly, they will also be easy to implement because the infrastructure is based on open standards.”

    The strategy, an agreement involving the government, regions and municipalities, was announced on 12 May. It includes 33 initiatives, which among other things deal with ease of use, reuse of data, IT architecture, growth, security and digital skills, DIGST says.

Licensing and Coding

Filed under
Development
Legal
  • The Oracle v. Google Suit is Still an Anti-Open Move That Shouldn't Have Happened

    All the way back in 2010, when Oracle filed a complaint for patent and copyright infringement against Google regarding parts of the Java code found in Google's Android mobile OS, I wrote a post calling the move "the anti-open move of the year." Fast-forward to today, and in the Oracle v. Google trial that just concluded, a jury returned a verdict in Google's favor. It basically concluded that Oracle's suit against Google, claiming that the use of Java APIs in Android violated copyright law, was bunk.

    Now, in an op-ed piece for Ars Technica, Annette Hurst, an attorney who represented Oracle, equates the jury's decision with the death of open source.

    [...]

    Hurst makes a good point that dual licensing models are increasing, with many open source projects available for free, while commercial versions, often including support, come at a cost. But the Oracle suit originated because Oracle essentially perceived itself as owning a moat around Java that didn't really exist.

    [...]

    Indeed, one of the lasting images of this long running legal skirmish is going to be Oracle behaving in a decidedly anti-open fashion. It may have been wiser for Oracle to simply let this one go.

  • Here’s how to check if software license is open source

    The Open Source Initiative (OSI), the steward of the Open Source Definition (OSD), announced today it has created a machine readable publication of OSI approved licenses.

    According to the Initiative, the API will allow third parties to ‘become license-aware’, giving businesses everywhere means to determine if a license is Open Source or not.

  • 3 Things Infrastructure as Code is Not

    The role of the network engineer is changing. This is not a result of DevOps, although some would claim it is. As DevOps takes center stage in organizations, it can seem like network engineers are being asked to become developers.

    There have been a number of talks discussing this, some of which have surfaced at Interop Las Vegas. The shift has been Infrastructure as Code (IaC), which was fundamental to the start of the DevOps movement. So maybe you could say this is caused by DevOps.

  • Introducing Blue Ocean: a new user experience for Jenkins

    While this project is in the alpha stage of development, the intent is that Jenkins users can install Blue Ocean side-by-side with the Jenkins Classic UI via a plugin.

    Not all the features listed on this blog are complete but we will be hard at work over the next few months preparing Blue Ocean for general use. We intend to provide regular updates on this blog as progress is made.

    Blue Ocean is open source today and we invite you to give us feedback and to contribute to the project.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Security challenges for the Qubes build process

    Ultimately, we would like to introduce a multiple-signature scheme, in which several developers (from different countries, social circles, etc.) can sign Qubes-produced binaries and ISOs. Then, an adversary would have to compromise all the build locations in order to get backdoored versions signed. For this to happen, we need to make the build process deterministic (i.e. reproducible). Yet, this task still seems to be years ahead of us. Ideally, we would also somehow combine this with Intel SGX, but this might be trickier than it sounds.

  • Katy Perry’s Twitter Account With 90 Million Followers Hacked

    Notably, with 90 million followers, Katy Perry is the most followed person on the platform.

FOSS Events (LibrePlanet, OSCON)

Filed under
GNU
OSS
  • LibrePlanet conference videos and slides online: Edward Snowden, Richard Stallman, Karen Sandler, and more

    Tuesday, May 31, 2016 – The Free Software Foundation (FSF) today announces that recordings and slides from its LibrePlanet 2016 free software conference are now available online.

    LibrePlanet 2016: Fork the System was held in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Stata Center on March 19 and 20, 2016. Video for the opening keynote with NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden and dozens more sessions from the conference – over 25 hours of free software ideas – are available on the FSF's instance of GNU MediaGoblin, a free software media publishing platform that is a decentralized replacement to sites like YouTube and Flickr.

  • Women Dominate 2016’s O’Reilly Open Source Awards

    In an illustration of the value of diversity, four out of five of the recipients presented with O’Reilly Open Source Awards at this year’s OSCON were women.

GNU Astronomy Debut

Filed under
GNU
  • GNU Astronomy Utilities is released

    The first public release of the GNU Astronomy Utilities (Gnuastro, version 0.1) tarball is now available for download, see below for more details. Gnuastro is an official GNU package consisting of a set of utilities, or executable programs (listed below), for astronomical data manipulation and analysis directly from the command-line (no mini-environment) and satisfying the GNU Coding Standards.

  • Gnuastro: GNU Gets Into Astronomy

    Gnuastro is the latest GNU Project.

    Gnuastro v0.1 was released today as the first public release of this package, which stands for the GNU Astronomy Utilities. Gnuastro contains utilities for astronomical data manipulation and analysis via the command-line.

Linux Lite 3.0 Final Released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Linux Lite 3.0 Final is now available for download. A lot has changed since Series 2. We have a new Login Manager, new Boot Theme, Lite Software has had an overhaul, new System Theme (Arc), we've added Share Hardware Configuration (Lite Info), Folder access from the Menu and Upgrades are now automated and seamless in Series 3. In addition, there has been a lot of bug fixes and adjustments since the Beta release, thanks again for your feedback.

Read more

More in Tux Machines

Calculate Linux 20

Calculate Linux released version 20 at the end of 2019 with major updates and is based off Gentoo. Calculate Linux Desktop (CLD) includes a wizard to configure a connection to Calculate Directory Server. According to their download page, "Calculate Linux Desktop is listed in the Russian Software Register." To sum that up, CLD is a distro from Russia, based off Gentoo, and designed to connect to a Calculate Directory Server. What is a Calculate Directory Server? Well according to their website, "Calculate Directory Server (CDS) is an advanced, LDAP-based authentication server designed to be a domain controller for business networks." Read more

Wine 5.2 release

The Wine development release 5.2 is now available. What's new in this release (see below for details): - More compatible codepage mapping tables. - Support for using the null display driver as a real driver. - Better UTF-8 support in the Resource and Message Compilers. - Fixes for using ucrtbase as C runtime. - Various bug fixes. The source is available from the following locations... Read more Also: Wine 5.2 With Better Handling For The Null Display Driver, UTF-8 Support The Wine 5.2 development release is out

Linux 5.6-rc2

More than halt the rc2 patch is actually Documentaiton updates,
because the kvm docs got turned into RST.

Another notable chunk is just tooling updates, which is about 50/50
perf updates (much of it due to header file syncing) and - again - kvm
updates.

But if you ignore those parts, and look at only the actual kernel code
updates, things look a bit calmer. The bulk ends up being network
driver updates (intel "ice" driver - E800 series - stands out) with
GPU updates a close second (i915, amd, panfrost). There's a few other
driver updates in there too, but they are mostly hidden in the noise
compared to the network and gpu subsystems: rdma, sound, acpi, block,
gpio etc.

Outside of drivers, there's the usual smattering of changes all over.
Filesystems (nfs, ext4, ceph, cifs, btrfs), architecture updates (x86,
arm), and some core code (scheduling, tracing, networking, io_uring).

The shortlog is appended, you can get a feel for the details by scanning it.

Go forth and test,

               Linus
Read more Also: Linux 5.6-rc2 Released - Led By Documentation + Tooling Updates

today's leftovers

  • This Week in Linux 93: MATE 1.24, KDE Plasma 5.18, Blender, OpenShot, Evernote, MX Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we have monster of a show with new releases from desktop environments like MATE and KDE Plasma to distro news from MX Linux, Ubuntu, Project Trident and Tiny Core. In App News this week, we see new releases from Blender, OpenShot and some interesting news from Evernote. We’ll also talk about some updates from TLP the laptop performance project and Wayland display server protocol. Later in the show, we’ll check out a cool gaming overlay project called MangoHud and we’ll discuss some Legal News related to Mycroft AI and their fight against a “Patent Troll”. All that and much more on Your Weekly Source for Linux GNews!

  • How Ceph powers exciting research with Open Source

    As researchers seek scalable, high performance methods for storing data, Ceph is a powerful technology that needs to be at the top of their list. Ceph is an open-source software-defined storage platform. While it’s not often in the spotlight, it’s working hard behind the scenes, playing a crucial role in enabling ambitious, world-renowned projects such as CERN’s particle physics research, Immunity Bio’s cancer research, The Human Brain Project, MeerKat radio telescope, and more. These ventures are propelling the collective understanding of our planet and the human race beyond imaginable realms, and the outcomes will forever change how we perceive our existence and potential. It’s high-time Ceph receives the praise it deserves for powering some of the most exciting research projects on Earth.

  • Kubernetes' Inevitable Takeover of the Data Center
  • How To Drive Infrastructure Like Uber Does
  • DragonFlyBSD 5.8-RC1 Is Ready With Many Changes From DSynth To Performance Optimizations

    Not only did NetBSD 9.0 make its debut today but DragonFlyBSD 5.8 was branched and its first release candidate made while DragonFlyBSD 5.9 is the version now open on Git master.

  • Executive interview: Melissa Di Donato, CEO, SUSE

    New CEO of the world’s largest independent open source company wants to make SUSE more innovative and help businesses to modernise traditional IT

  • Every time Windows 10 Updates, it deletes all saved desktop icons, clears my taskbar, deletes all my saved favorites, passwords, and more!

    Every time my PC updates my desktop wallpaper goes back to default, and all saved icons, favorites, passwords, etc are gone. Every. Single. Time. This is getting tiring and I'm losing so much time at work saving my icons again, paswords, etc. What is going on? Also keeps changing my default printer even when the box is left un-checked, when the computer updates and restarts the box will be checked. Its almost as if the computer is set back to default after every update. Please help. I've tried quite a few things to fix and no luck.

  • February Win10 1903 and 1909 cumulative update, KB 4532693, causing desktops to disappear

    Microsoft should be paying you to beta test their buggy patches.

  • Windows 10: Update KB4532693 kills user data/profile

    There are reports that cumulative update KB4532693 for Windows 10 versions 1903 and 1909 dated February 11, 2020, is causing significant issues for some users. Desktop gone, files gone, icons gone and more.

  • Second Windows 10 update is now causing problems by hiding user profiles

    Windows 10 users are reporting that a second Windows update included in this month's Patch Tuesday is causing problems. According to reports, a bug in the KB4532693 update is hiding user profiles and their respective data on some Windows 10 systems.