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July 2016

Parsix GNU/Linux 8.10 "Erik" Officially Released Based on Debian 8.5 "Jessie"

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Today, July 31, 2016, the development team behind the Parsix GNU/Linux operating system have had the great pleasure of announcing the release of Parsix GNU/Linux 8.10 "Erik."

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IDM For Ubuntu - Install IDM On Ubuntu And Other Linux Distributions

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

IDM is the favourite download manager of most Windows users. But, after moving to Linux their favourite download manager goes away because it's not available for Ubuntu or any other distributions. But don't worry, here is a way to make IDM for Ubuntu through Wine.

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Snap! — Beyond teaching coding to would-be programmers

Filed under
Development

Block-based programming languages are not the be-all and end-all of Computer Science learning and they are not meant to be. You could use them without ever intending your students pursue a career in programming. For those who do want to become developers, tools like Snap! are a good starting point from which to get a handle on complex programming concepts, such as OOP, modularity, events, and so on. For other students, they provide a fun and consistent way of training your brain for logical reasoning and out-of-the-box problem solving.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • The Upgradeable Allwinner Dev Board That's Laptop-Compatible Raises $50k So Far

    At the beginning of the month I wrote about That Open, Upgradeable ARM Dev Board Is Trying To Make A Comeback, the EOMA68-spec'ed project formerly known as the Improv Dev Board. It's still using the same (rather slow) Allwinner SoC but has since seen some improvements and there's also a laptop compatible route too. The project has now raised more than $50k USD, but their goal is still three times that at $150k they are trying to raise over the next month.

  • My Microsoft Office 365 woes: Constant crashes, malware macros – and settings from Hell

    Microsoft Office remains one of the most important software products available, despite some rather nasty flaws. For me, Microsoft Office and video games anchor me to Windows. While video games seem set to remain largely Windows-only for the foreseeable future, Office is losing its grip.

    For a long time, I used Office because it was faster. Perhaps more importantly, I knew most of it worked, and I could fairly quickly make a fresh installation do what I wanted. Office 365 has changed all of that.

    To be perfectly honest, I'm not entirely certain why I got Office 365. I was perfectly happy using Office 2010 that had been beaten about the ears enough to look and feel identical to Office 2003. It was quick, the context menus gave me access to all the commands I wanted, and I managed to get rid of both the spacing after the paragraphs and all those dumb "smart quotes."

    Perhaps someone sent me a file that wouldn't open in 2010. Perhaps it was yet another attempt to make Lync work. I will probably never remember. Regardless, the shift to Office 365's version of Office 2013 – and eventually 2016 – has been a descent into madness.

  • Deploy Kubernetes with ansible on Atomic
  • Install Zulip on Ubuntu
  • Parabola 2016.07.27 Screenshot Tour
  • Create two, three, many openSUSE Guides
  • Friday Session Wrap for Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • On managing Ruby versions

    This is a little thought on packaged Ruby versions (mostly in Linux-based systems) and why I don’t get many people advising newcomers to start by installing RVM when in reality they just want to program Ruby.

  • Are You Satisfied With Your Ubuntu Phone? (Poll)

    Ubuntu OTA 12 will have completed its phased roll out by the time you read this, and feedback to the changes it brings will not doubt have begun to roll in. Now that we’re almost 18 months on from the launch of the very first Ubuntu Phone I’m curious as to you are getting on with your Ubuntu Phone?

  • Snappy Sprint Heidelberg

    I recently attended Snappy Sprint Heidelberg, the first Snappy sprint focused on upstream and cross-distribution collaboration.

    Snappy is a technology with an interesting history: initially started to provide App Store-like semantics (atomicity, declarative security) for the Ubuntu Phone project, it has since expanded to be a platform for desktop application deployment (e.g. VLC), as well as server applications and the IoT space.

  • ReactOS 0.4.2 Nears With Many Features

    The first release candidate to the upcoming ReactOS 0.4.2 release is now available, the project aiming to be an open-source re-implementation of Microsoft Windows.

  • Software Freedom Kosova Conference SFK’16 Call for Speakers

    SKF | Software Freedom Kosova is an annual international conference in Kosovo organized to promote free/libre open source software, free culture and open knowledge, now in its 7th edition. It is organized by FLOSSK, a non governmental, not for profit organization, dedicated to promote software freedom and related philosophies.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Xen patches critical guest privilege escalation bug

    A freshly uncovered bug in the Xen virtualisation hypervisor could potentially allow guests to escalate their privileges until they have full control of the hosts they're running on.

    The Xen hypervisor is used by cloud giants Amazon Web Services, IBM and Rackspace.

    Inadequate security checks of how virtual machines access memory means a malicous, paravirtualised guest administrator can raise their system privileges to that of the host on unpatched installations, Xen said.

  • Xen Vulnerability Allows Hackers To Escape Qubes OS VM And Own the Host
  • The Security of Our Election Systems [Too much of Microsoft]

    The FBI is investigating. WikiLeaks promises there is more data to come. The political nature of this cyberattack means that Democrats and Republicans are trying to spin this as much as possible. Even so, we have to accept that someone is attacking our nation's computer systems in an apparent attempt to influence a presidential election. This kind of cyberattack targets the very core of our democratic process. And it points to the possibility of an even worse problem in November ­ that our election systems and our voting machines could be vulnerable to a similar attack.

  • Data program accessed in cyber-attack on Democrats, says Clinton campaign [iophk: "Windows still"]

    A data program used by the campaign of the Democratic presidential candidate, Hillary Clinton, was “accessed” as a part of hack on the Democratic National Committee (DNC) that intelligence officials believe was carried out by Russia’s intelligence services, Clinton’s campaign said on Friday.

  • A Famed Hacker Is Grading Thousands of Programs — and May Revolutionize Software in the Process

    “There are applications out there that really do demonstrate good [security] hygiene … and the vast majority are somewhere else on the continuum from moderate to atrocious,” Peiter Zatko says. “But the nice thing is that now you can actually see where the software package lives on that continuum.”

    Joshua Corman, founder of I Am the Cavalry, a group aimed at improving the security of software in critical devices like cars and medical devices, and head of the Cyber Statecraft Initiative for the Atlantic Council, says the public is in sore need of data that can help people assess the security of software products.

    “Markets do well when an informed buyer can make an informed risk decision, and right now there is incredibly scant transparency in the buyer’s realm,” he says.

Linux and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

GNOME Maps Is Back On Track Thanks to Mapbox

Filed under
GNOME

The desktop GNOME Maps app hit a dead-end earlier this month after the free service it used to display maps changed it usage policy.

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GNOME Maps App Is Functional Again, Switches to Mapbox API Through a GNOME Proxy

Filed under
GNOME

The GNOME developers behind the Maps application distributed as part of the GNOME Stack announced today the availability of an important release of the project since it lost access to the MapQuest service.

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More in Tux Machines

Audiocasts/Shows: Debian 10.5 KDE Plasma Run Through, Late Night Linux, Linux Headlines

  • Debian 10.5 KDE Plasma Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at Debian 10.5. Enjoy!

  • Late Night Linux – Episode 95

    A look back at the year in Linux so far, some speculation about what’s coming, Lineage OS on the Raspberry Pi, and KDE Korner.

  • 2020-08-03 | Linux Headlines

    Linux kernel 5.8 is out, BunsenLabs rebases to Debian 10 “Buster,” Mastodon releases version 3.2 with multimedia enhancements, and The Linux Foundation forms the Open Source Security Foundation.

today's howtos

Android Leftovers

today's leftovers

  • KDE NEON 20200723 overview | The latest and greatest of KDE community

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of KDE NEON 20200723 and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • Vulkan 1.2.149 Released With Another Extension For Helping The Likes Of DXVK

    Vulkan 1.2.149 is out today and its lone new extension is yet another addition to the Vulkan API for helping translation layers like DXVK map other graphics APIs on top. Vulkan has been quite welcoming of additions to help run graphics APIs like OpenGL and Direct3D on top of it. With today's release of Vulkan 1.2.149 there is another addition to help in that multi-project effort and it's VK_EXT_4444_formats.

  • Linux 5.9 Dropping The Unicore 32-bit RISC Architecture

    It's arguably long overdue but with the just-opened Linux 5.9 kernel cycle the Unicore32 CPU architecture is being removed. Unicore is a 32-bit RISC architecture developed at China's Peking University. Unicore is an ARM-like architecture. But with Unicore not being too popular and this code not seeing any maintenance for the mainline kernel paired with no upstream compiler support, it's time to gut the code out of the kernel.

  • IO_uring Has Many Improvements Set To Go Into Linux 5.9

    Facebook's Jens Axboe who oversees the Linux storage/block code and leads the IO_uring efforts summed up the changes for Linux 5.9 as "hardening the code and/or making it easier to read and fixing [bits]." There is though a big change and that is proper async buffered reads support. That work was previously covered but didn't end up getting pulled into Linux 5.8 due to a branching difference but is now ready to go with Linux 5.9. The async buffered reads support for IO_uring has some nice performance advantages and lower CPU usage while also working its way off KThreads for the fast code path once the async buffered write support is in place.

  • New Helix by OnLogic brings GPU computing to the Edge

    Both systems can be configured with a range of Windows operating systems or Ubuntu Linux, and OnLogic plans to add imaging options for many of their software partners in the future, including Ignition by Inductive Automation, ThinManager, EdgeIQ, IGEL and AWS Greengrass.

  • Looks like the recent upwards trend of the Linux market share has calmed down [Ed: As if a Microsoft partner which pretends Android and ChromeOS etc. don't exist was ever painting an accurate picture...]

    For NetMarketShare, something pretty big happened over the last few months. Back in March the Linux share they recorded was only 1.36%, and then it quickly rocketed upwards to 3.61% in June after multiple months of rising. The kind of rise you can't easily just write-off since it continued happening. No one really knows what caused it, possibly a ton more people working from home and not attached to their corporate Windows workstation. Now though, it seems to be levelling out as July's figure now shows it as 3.57%. Considering more people are being told to go back to work, perhaps it was as a result of COVID19. Across that whole time though, it's worth noting StatCounter which also tracks it has hardly moved this whole time. So you may want to press X to doubt on it.

  • Librem 5 June 2020 Software Development Update

    This is another incarnation of the software development progress for the Librem 5. This time for June 2020 (weeks 23-26). Some items are covered in more detail in separate blog posts at https://puri.sm/news. The idea of this summary is to have a closer look at the coding and design side of things. It also shows how much we’re standing on the shoulders of giants reusing existing software and how contributions are flowing back and forth between upstream and downstream projects. This quickly gets interesting since we’re upstream for some projects (e.g. calls, phosh, chatty) and downstream for others (e.g Debian, Linux kernel, GNOME). So these reports are usually rather link heavy pointing to individual merge requests on https://source.puri.sm/ or to the upstream side (like e.g. GNOME’s gitlab).

  • Red Hat certification remote exams now available

    It’s not a new idea that organizations worldwide need and seek qualified IT professionals with the skills and knowledge needed to use Red Hat products successfully. And for the last two decades, Red Hat Training and Certification has provided a way for them to assess, train and validate skills. Last year, we launched preliminary exams as a way to provide experience with our hands-on approach to testing to a broader audience and to explore making this approach more widely available as online exams. This year, the COVID-19 pandemic has meant temporary site closures, lockdowns and social distancing. Going to a test center to take an exam is not an option in many places. Even if it is, candidates for certification might be understandably reluctant to visit a center to take an exam. With that in mind, Red Hat has accelerated our efforts, and I am very pleased to announce that several of our certification exams are now available remotely.

  • Red Hat Customer Success Stories: digital transformation through people, process and technology

    Condis Supermarcats is a family-owned supermarket chain that is a household name in central and northern Spain. The company operates more than 400 physical storefronts, ranging from hypermarkets to local convenience stores, and a growing digital business. In 2017, Condis began several high-profile projects as part of its digital transformation efforts, including launch of a new customer resource management (CRM) system and a customer-facing mobile application. To support these projects, Condis’s IT team sought to better integrate the company’s IT infrastructure with microservices. "Our architecture was not cloud-integrated or suited for the agile approach we needed to develop our digital business," said Sergio Murillo, Technology Development and IT Operations Manager at Condis. "For example, each Condis store has access to a customer database, centralized using a cloud-based tool. However, we needed this data exchange to be integrated seamlessly with our CRM."

  • 10 Years of OpenStack – Gary Kevorkian at Cisco

    Storytelling is one of the most powerful means to influence, teach, and inspire the people around us. To celebrate OpenStack’s 10th anniversary, we are spotlighting stories from the individuals in various roles from the community who have helped to make OpenStack and the global Open Infrastructure community successful.

  • The Month in WordPress: July 2020

    July was an action-packed month for the WordPress project. The month saw a lot of updates on one of the most anticipated releases – WordPress 5.5! WordCamp US 2020 was canceled and the WordPress community team started experimenting with different formats for engaging online events, in July. Read on to catch up with all the updates from the WordPress world.