Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

August 2016

A new OpenSUSE Linux is coming to town, and it's all about stability

Filed under
SUSE

Linux users come in many shapes and sizes, but those in the business world typically steer clear of the bleeding edge. That's why the OpenSUSE project recently switched to a two-pronged development approach, with one version focused on constant updates and another on enterprise-grade stability. On Wednesday, the latter took a big step forward.

The first beta version of OpenSUSE Leap 42.2 is now available, giving enterprises and other stability-minded users the chance to check it out and get a taste of what's coming in the final release, which is due Nov. 16. This is the first key update to the Leap software since OpenSUSE adopted its dual-path approach late last year with OpenSUSE 42.1.

“Leap is for pragmatic and conservative technology adopters,” Ludwig Nussel, the release manager for OpenSUSE Leap, said in the software's official announcement. “Testing the beta helps make Leap even more mature, so we encourage as many people as possible to test it.”

Read more

Kernel News (Linux/Linux Foundation)

Filed under
Linux
  • Getting Blockchain Technology Enterprise-Ready

    Blockchain technology first burst onto the scene as the underpinning of Bitcoin digital currency. Since then, open source distributed ledger technology has continued to evolve into an unparalleled asset tracker. It brings new efficiencies and much-needed transparency to online transactions in a world where assets move and change hands at Internet speeds.

  • Logitech M720 Triathlon Multi-Device Bluetooth Mouse is perfect for Linux dual-booters
  • An introduction to Linux network routing

    In June when I discussed basic network configuration, one thing I did not talk about then is routing. This article provides a very brief introduction to routing for Linux computers, designed for understanding simple environments.

    Every computer attached to a network requires some type of routing instructions for network TCP/IP packets when they leave the local host. This is usually very straightforward because most network environments are very simple and there are only two options for departing packets. All packets are sent either to a device on the local network or to some other, remote network.

Planet KDE's Latest

Filed under
KDE

Salix 14.2 Xfce Edition Officially Released Based on Slackware 14.2, Xfce 4.12

Filed under
GNU
Linux

After being in development for the past three months, the Salix 14.2 Xfce Edition operating system has finally hit the stable channels, and it is now available for download.

Based on the Slackware 14.2 GNU/Linux distribution and built around the lightweight and highly customizable Xfce 4.12 desktop environment, Salix 14.2 Xfce Edition ships with numerous improvements and new features that some of you who managed to test-drive the Beta and Release Candidate pre-releases are already accustomed with. Of course, many of the core components and default applications have been updated to their latest versions.

Read more

Leftovers: Security

Filed under
Security
  • Tor 0.2.8.7 Addresses Important Bug Related to ReachableAddresses Option

    The Tor Project, through Nick Mathewson, is pleased to inform the Tor community about the release and general availability of yet another maintenance update to the Tor 0.2.8 stable series.

  • Emergency Service Window for Kolab Now

    We’re going to need to free up a hypervisor and put its load on other hypervisors, in order to pull out the one hypervisor and have some of its faulty hardware replaced — but there’s two problems;

    The hypervisor to free up has asserted required CPU capabilities most of the eligible targets do not have — this prevents a migration that does not involve a shut down, reconfiguration, and restart of the guest.

TheSSS 19.0 Linux Server Out with Kernel 4.4.14, Apache 2.4.23 & MariaDB 10.1.16

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

TheSSS (The Smallest Server Suite) is one of the lightest Linux kernel-based operating systems designed to be used as an all-around server for home users, as well as small- and medium-sized businesses looking for a quick and painless way of distributing files across networks or to simply test some web-based software.

Read more

GNOME Control Center 3.22 to Update the Keyboard Settings, Improve Networking

Filed under
GNOME

The upcoming GNOME 3.22 desktop environment is still in the works, and a first Beta build was seeded to public beta testers last week, bringing multiple enhancements and new features to most of its core components and apps.

While GNOME 3.22 Beta was announced on August 22, it appears that the maintainers of certain core packages needed a little more time to work on various improvements and polish their applications before they were suitable for public testing. And this is the case of GNOME Control Center, which was recently updated to version 3.21.90, which means 3.22 Beta.

Read more

OpenShot 2.1

Filed under
Software

Canonical Releases Snapd 2.13 Snappy Tool for Ubuntu 16.04 and Fedora 24 (COPR)

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

Canonical's Michael Vogt has been happy to announce the release and immediate availability of a new maintenance update of the Snapd daemon that implements support for Snap universal binary packages in GNU/Linux distributions.

Read more

Also:

More in Tux Machines

GNU Compiler and Bison 3.2.2 Release

  • Intel Cascade Lake Support Posted For The GCC Compiler
    Intel developers have submitted their GCC compiler enablement patch for the Cascade Lake 14nm CPUs due out starting in early 2019. The GNU Compiler Collection patch adds support for the -march=cascadelake target for generating optimized code for these upcoming server and enthusiast class processors.
  • Bison 3.2.2 released [stable]
    Bison 3.2 brought massive improvements to the deterministic C++ skeleton, lalr1.cc. When variants are enabled and the compiler supports C++11 or better, move-only types can now be used for semantic values. C++98 support is not deprecated. Please see the NEWS below for more details. Many thanks to Frank Heckenbach for paving the way for this release with his implementation of a skeleton in C++17, and to Nelson H. F. Beebe for testing exhaustively portability issues.

Industrial dev board builds on Raspberry Pi CM3

Kontron announced an industrial-focused “Passepartout” development kit built around a Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 Light and equipped with a dual Ethernet, HDMI, CAN, 1-Wire, RPi 40-pin connectors. Kontron announced its first Raspberry Pi based product. The Passepartout — which is French for “goes everywhere” and the name of Phileas Fogg’s valet in Jules Verne’s “Around the World in Eighty Days” — builds upon the Linux-driven Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 Light (CM3L). The Light version lacks the 4GB of eMMC flash of the standard CM3 module but still supports eMMC or microSD storage. The CM3L is otherwise identical, with features including a quad-core, 1.2GHz Broadcom BCM2837 and 1GB of LPDDR2 RAM. Read more

Patches For The Better Spectre STIBP Approach Revised - Version 7 Under Review

Version 7 of the task property based options to enable Spectre V2 userspace-userspace protection patches, a.k.a. the work offering improved / less regressing approach for STIBP, is now available for testing and code review. Tim Chen of Intel sent out the seventh revision to these patches on Tuesday night. Besides the Spectre V2 app-to-app protection modes, these patches include the work for disabling STIBP (Single Thread Indirect Branch Predictors) when enhanced IBRS (Indirect Branch Restricted Speculation) is supported/used, and allowing for STIBP to be enabled manually and just by default for non-dumpable tasks. Read more

today's howtos