Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

November 2016

Good News for Jolla (Linux)

Filed under
Linux

Canonical offers direct Docker support to Ubuntu users

Filed under
Ubuntu

Enterprise Ubuntu users running Docker in production now have a new source for Docker support: from Canonical.

Earlier today, Canonical and Docker announced joint support for the commercial edition of Docker Engine on Ubuntu. The pair also will provide updates for Docker on Ubuntu through an application delivery system Canonical originally devised.

Read more

Zorin OS 12 Improves Linux Desktop Access for Windows Users

Filed under
OS

There is a seemingly endless variety of Linux distributions in the marketplace, each attempting to carve out its own unique market niche. Zorin OS is one such flavor — a desktop-focused Linux distribution with the goal of helping Windows and macOS users to make the transition to Linux. Zorin OS 12, its latest milestone release, became generally available Nov. 18. Among the improvements in the new release is the updated Zorin Desktop 2.0, based on the open-source Gnome Shell. The new desktop provides users with redesigned icons and a new look for windows and navigation. A feature of Zorin worth noting is the ability to configure the desktop using Zorin Appearance, a tool that provides configurable options for layout, theme, fonts and panel display. Zorin OS also aims to help make the transition from Windows easier by directly integrating the Wine software compatibility layer, which enables many different types of Windows applications to run natively on Linux. Additionally, the included PlayOnLinux tool provides Zorin OS users with a menu of games, internet and office applications that can be installed easily. This slide show covers some of the key highlights of the Zorin OS 12 release.

Read more

SUSE buys HPE’s OpenStack and Cloud Foundry assets

Filed under
SUSE

SUSE, which probably is best known for its Linux distribution, has long been a quiet but persistent player in the OpenStack ecosystem. Over the last few months, though, the German company has also emerged as one of the stronger competitors in this world, especially now that we are seeing a good bit of consolidation around OpenStack.

Today, SUSE announced that it is acquiring OpenStack and Cloud Foundry (the Platform-as-a-Service to OpenStack’s Infrastructure-as-a-Service) assets and talent from the troubled HPE. This follows HPE’s decision to sell off (or “spin-merge” in HPE’s own language) its software business (including Autonomy, which HP bought for $11 billion, followed by a $9 billion write-off) to Micro Focus. And to bring this full circle: Micro Focus also owns SUSE, and SUSE is now picking up HPE’s OpenStack and Cloud Foundry assets.

Read more

Also: SUSE acquires HPE OpenStack and Cloud Foundry assets

Fedora 25 makes Linux easy enough for anyone to try

Filed under
Red Hat

When I got the heads-up that Red Hat was readying the release of Fedora 25, it caught my attention like any new release of a major Linux distribution would. But I was in for a pleasant surprise when I went to download a copy of the image.

The first thing to know about the new version of Fedora is that you don’t have to download an ISO file and write it to a USB stick. This is an important thing to note, as preparing installation media for Linux is one of the bigger hurdles for newbies. (When I say newbies, I think of my mom trying to download and properly burn a USB image.)

Read more

NVIDIA GTX 680 To GTX 1080 Blender OpenCL Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

For this article are benchmarks of 13 Kepler/Maxwell/Pascal NVIDIA GeForce graphics cards when testing Blender 2.78's OpenCL renderer. Unfortunately, no AMD OpenCL benchmarks for Blender yet -- the current open-source stack doesn't work until ROCm OpenCL support comes into play and the AMDGPU-PRO stack wasn't working for Blender OpenCL but was falling back to CPU rendering.

Read more

Qt Creator 4.2 RC1 released

Filed under
KDE

We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 4.2 RC1.

Since the release of the Beta, we’ve been busy with polishing things and fixing bugs. Just to name a few:

We fixed that the run button could spuriously stay disabled after parsing QMake projects.
Qt Creator is no longer blocked while the iOS Simulator is starting up.
We added preliminary support for MSVC2017 (based on its RC).

For an overview of the new features in 4.2 please head over to the Beta release blog post. See our change log for a more detailed view on what has changed.

Read more

Also: Qt Creator 4.2 RC1 Released

First open source RISC-V chips arrive in Arduino board

Filed under
OSS

SiFive’s Arduino ready “HiFive1” dev kit features its 320MHz FE310, the first MCU using the open RISC-V ISA. Also, Samsung is rumored to be using RISC-V.

In July, San Francisco-based startup SiFive unveiled the first SoCs based on the open source RISC-V platform: A Linux-ready octa-core Freedom U500 and a FreeRTOS-based Freedom E300. Now, the company has gone to Crowd Supply to sell an open source, Arduino compatible HiFive1 development board based on the FE300 that it claims is the fastest Arduino compatible in the world, 10 times faster even than Intel’s Arduino 101.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Server Administration

Filed under
Server
  • Outlook.com is still not functioning properly for some Microsoft punters

    Microsoft is still working to resolve "difficulties" faced by its Outlook customers, despite months of complaints about the disappearance of sent emails and 550 Errors.

    A growing number of complaints threads have been posted to Microsoft's questions page regarding Outlook after recent upgrades to the service. They both precede and follow last week's outage, which Redmond's PRs failed to explain to us.

  • OpenStack Becomes a Standard Building Block for NFV

    OpenStack is becoming the de facto standard for infrastructure orchestration for NFV deployment by leading Communications Service Providers (CSPs). CSPs are trading off the challenges of OpenStack implementations (e.g. immature technology and evolving standards) for the benefits of open source and open architectures (i.e. reduced vendor lock-in). Lack of standards for NFV management and orchestration (MANO) remains a leading impediment.

  • The Docker monitoring problem

    You have probably heard of Docker—it is a young container technology with a ton of momentum. But if you haven’t, you can think of containers as easily—configured, lightweight VMs that start up fast, often in under one second. Containers are ideal for microservice architectures and for environments that scale rapidly or release often.

    Docker is becoming such an important technology that it is likely that your organization will begin working with Docker soon, if it has not already. When we explored real usage data, we found an explosion of Docker usage in production: it has grown 5x in the last 12 months.

    Containers address several important operational problems; that is why Docker is taking the infrastructure world by storm.

    But there is a problem: containers come and go so frequently, and change so rapidly, that they can be an order of magnitude more difficult to monitor and understand than physical or virtual hosts. This article describes the Docker monitoring problem—and solution—in detail.

    We hope that reading this article will help you fall in love with monitoring containers, despite the challenges. In our experience, if you monitor your infrastructure in a way that works for containers—whether or not you use them—you will have great visibility into your infrastructure.

  • Keynote: New Requirements for Application Delivery in a Micro-services Application World
  • Kontena Introduces Production-Ready, Open Source Container and Microservices Platform

More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

today's howtos

Software: Audacity, Geary, GNOME Photos, Business Apps, Mir, Nix, KubeVirt, Top Projects and Apoxi

  • Audacity 2.2.2 Released with a Stack of New Features & Improvements
    This update also builds upon the major changes introduced in the release of Audacity 2.2.0 last year, as well that of the minor 2.2.1 update earlier this year.
  • Geary Email Client Mails Out a Bug Fix Update
    A new version of the Geary email client for Linux desktops is available to download. Although a (relative) minor update when compared to the huge Geary 0.12 release last year, Geary 0.12.1 is worthwhile. The update solves a stack of crashes and server compatibility issues, while also updating translations in the interface and user manual to ensure as many people can use Geary as possible.
  • GNOME Photos – An Elegant Alternative for Organizing and Sharing Photos
    How many GNU/Linux photo managers do you know have a beautiful UI for browsing photos and organizing them into collections coupled with inbuilt editing tools and cloud integration? This one goes by the name of GNOME Photos. GNOME Photos is a simple and yet elegant photo management app with which you can organize, share, and intuitively edit your photos on your Linux workstation. It features a file manager-like environment for easy navigation and cloud integration via GNOME Online Accounts.
  • Linux Means Business – Best Free Business Apps
    Let’s deal with the issue of cost up front. Every single application featured in this article is available to download without payment. This, in itself, helps to keep IT costs within a tight budget. And cost can be a very important driver when seeking an IT solution for firms – particularly for freelancers, entrepreneurs, start-ups, small businesses, and educational establishments. Naturally, these types of people and organizations will have some sort of IT budget. From a business perspective, open source business applications won’t necessarily be zero cost. Using unfamiliar software entails training costs for a firm — the costs are not limited to time itself. And then there’s the expense of obtaining support for the software, or even hiring development time to customize certain aspects of the software to add additional functionality. Off-the-shelf software is unlikely to completely address a company’s needs. But if a proprietary solution is sought, it’s likely that this development will be more expensive. It is sometimes thought that Linux software cannot rival Microsoft applications in a commercial setting because the strength of Linux comes from its price. In fact, Linux’s strength derives from other considerations such as flexibility, stability, security, cutting-edge technology, and ease of use. Additionally, the virtues of open source software are invaluable to commercial organizations whatever their size. With full access to source code, companies can easily develop extensions to the software, tailor made to their own specific needs and requirements. Moreover they are not reliant on the goodwill of a single vendor in order to do business: Linux is about freedom and choice and that is just as important to an organisation as to an individual.
  • Mir's Wayland Support Will Now Let You Drag Around Windows
    I was surprised to learn that up until this week, Mir's initial Wayland support didn't allow for windows of Wayland clients to be moved around the screen. Fortunately, that has now been resolved with allowing window movement to be initiated by Wayland clients running on Mir. Now you can enjoy Qt, GTK apps, and even the Weston Terminal to be moved around the screen. Previously there was just server-side support for moving windows in Wayland while now is client-side support.
  • Nix 2.0 Package Manager Released With A Ton Of Changes
    Nix 2.0 is now available as the latest major update to this functional package manager most commonly associated with the NixOS Linux distribution.
  • KubeVirt v0.3.0-alpha.3: Kubernetes native networking and storage
    First post for quite some time. A side effect of being busy to get streamline our KubeVirt user experience. KubeVirt v0.3.0 was not released at the beginnig of the month. That release was intended to be a little bigger, because it included a large architecture change (to the good). The change itself was amazingly friendly and went in without much problems - even if it took some time. But, the work which was building upon this patch in the storage and network areas was delayed and didn’t make it in time. Thus we skipped the release in order to let storage and network catch up.
  • Top 5 open source projects for 2018
    In our increasingly collaborative world, open source technology is a top trend that is having a major impact on the development and implementation of cutting edge capabilities. Open source is when source code connected to a program is made freely available, giving users the opportunity to make modifications and to share with other users. The common alternative to this is proprietary software, source code that remains under the strict control of an organisation, team or individual, ensuring that the integral code remains private and controlled by its owner.
  • DataTorrent Glues Open Source Componentry with ‘Apoxi’
    Building an enterprise-grade big data application with open source components is not easy. Anybody who has worked with Apache Hadoop ecosystem technology can tell you that. But the folks at DataTorrent say they’ve found a way to accelerate the delivery of secure and scalable big data applications with Apoxi, a new framework they created to stitch together major open source components like Hadoop, Spark, and Kafka, in an extensible and pluggable fashion.

GNOME and Fedora

  • RFC: Integrating rsvg-rs into librsvg
    I have started an RFC to integrate rsvg-rs into librsvg. rsvg-rs is the Rust binding to librsvg. Like the gtk-rs bindings, it gets generated from a pre-built GIR file.
  • 1+ year of Fedora and GNOME hardware enablement
    A year and a couple of months ago, Christian Schaller asked me to pivot a little bit from working full time on Fleet Commander to manage a new team we were building to work on client hardware enablement for Fedora and GNOME with an emphasis on upstream. The idea was to fill the gap in the organization where nobody really owned the problem of bringing up new client hardware features vertically across the stack (from shell down to the kernel), or rather, ensure Fedora and GNOME both work great on modern laptops. Part of that deal was to take over the bootloader and start working closer to customers and hardware manufacturing parnters.
  • Fedora Atomic Workstation: Works on the beach
    My trip is getting really close, so I decided to upgrade my system to rawhide. Wait, what ? That is usually what everybody would tell you not to do. Rawhide has this reputation for frequent breakage, and who knows if my apps will work any given day. Not something you want to deal with while traveling.
  • 4 cool new projects to try in COPR for February