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March 2017

Microsoft Surrenders

Filed under
Microsoft

Open source OTA software targets Linux devices

Filed under
Linux

Mender’s open source, Yocto-optimized OTA updater for embedded Linux devices features a dual A/B rootfs partition layout with automatic rollback support.

After a two-year develop cycle, Mender has released the first production-ready version of its eponymous over-the-air (OTA) updating software for embedded Linux devices. The software is promoted as being the only OTA product that offers open source licensing for both the client installed on the device and the management server.

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Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming

GNOME Mini News

Filed under
GNOME
  • Rust’ic GNOME, Day 3

    Today is day 3 of the GNOME+Rust hackfest in Mexico City at the beautiful new Red Hat office. We’ve been working on all sorts of stuff since we were graced with the presence of a few Rust hackers from Mozilla Research.

  • [GNOME] Recipe Icon

    Initially I was going to do a more elaborate workflow tutorial, but time flies when you’re having fun on 3.24. With the release out, I’d rather publish this than let it rot. Maybe the next one!

Security Leftovers

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Security

Linux/FOSS/Containers on Servers

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Server
  • Docker at Four: The State of the Docker Ecosystem from 2013 to Today

    Docker containers turned four years old this month. If you were paying attention to Docker in its early days, you know that the Docker ecosystem today looks nothing like it did then. Here's how the Docker world has evolved since Docker's launch in 2013.

  • Kubernetes Federation in a Post-Configuration Management Universe

    When containerization was young, one of its early principles was the ideal of immutable infrastructure, the ability to build a support structure for a container that was flexible enough to meet the container’s needs during its lifespan, which may be short, but remained a fixed asset throughout that duration.

  • Cloud Native Computing Foundation Welcomes Containerd and Rkt as New Projects

    At the CloudNative/Kubecon EU event in Berlin on March 29, the big news was that Docker contributed its containerd runtime, while CoreOS contributed its rkt (pronounced rocket) runtime to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). The containerd and rkt projects are rival container runtimes that aim to implement specifications that are being formally defined by the Open Container Initiative (OCI) project.

  • Why Kubernetes Sucks and How to Fix It

    Joe Beda is in a better position than most to understand what's wrong with Kubernetes. Beda helped to start the Kubernetes project while he was at Google; he now runs a startup called Heptio that is aiming to help further enable Kubernetes.

    At the Kubecon / CloudNative EU conference in Berlin, Beda delivered a keynote address on what needs to change in Kubernetes to bring in more users.

Kernel, Graphics, and Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • Getting more out of Qt Quick with OpenVG

    In Qt 5.9 is now possible to render Qt Quick applications with OpenVG when using hardware that supports it. This is made possible by a new scene graph adaptation that uses EGL and OpenVG to render Qt Quick scenes. When using Qt for Device Creation, it means that it now be possible to run with graphics hardware acceleration on some devices where today only software rendering is available.

  • Qt 5.9's OpenVG Renderer For Hardware Lacking OpenGL

    One of the many new features for the upcoming Qt 5.9 is an OpenVG renderer for hardware acceleration on some embedded platforms that lack OpenGL capabilities.

    OpenVG for the uninitiated is a 2D vector graphics API backed by The Khronos Group. It hasn't been updated in almost one decade with OpenGL ES largely taking over on the mobile/embedded front, but there still is some embedded hardware out there with still having OpenVG v1.1 drivers. There used to be an OpenVG state tracker in Mesa's Gallium3D, but that's long been dead.

  • Kdenlive status update

    Ever since the port to QT5/KF5 in 2015, Kdenlive has seen an increasing momentum to developing its full potential in being a stable and reliable video editing tool which the FLOSS community can use to create content and democratize communication. In 2016 the project saw a redesign of its visual identity (logo, website), the reintroduction of some much requested tools like rotoscoping and a Windows port. During these couple of years we’ve seen a boom in the size of the community.

  • Kdenlive's Status Ahead Of 17.04

    The Kdenlive video editor project in the KDE camp has published a new status update concerning the health of the project.

    Kdenlive developers continue seeing momentum building around their video editor since reviving it with the transition to Qt5 and KDE Frameworks 5. Over the past year they have added many tools, a Windows port, and other efforts to make Kdenlive pro-capable.

  • Tearing with Nvidia Proprietary Drivers on Plasma? Try this.

    This is a neat little trick that’s been making the rounds, and after seeing success with several people on Reddit I thought it was worth posting somewhere more visible. This will look at removing screen tearing (often entirely) when using Nvidia Proprietary graphics on the Plasma Desktop.

  • [Krita] Game art course released!

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  • Krita 3.1.3 Alpha released

    We’re working like crazy on the next versions of Krita — 3.1.3 and 4.0. Krita 3.1.3 will be a stable bugfix release, 4.0 will have the vector work and the python scripting. This week we’ve prepared the first 3.1.3 alpha builds for testing! The final release of 3.1.3 is planned for end of April.

    We’re still working on fixing more bugs for the final 3.1.3 release, so please test these builds, and if you find an issue, check whether it’s already in the bug tracker, and if not, report it!

  • Linux Thursday with BtrFS, Internet Privacy, KDE Hate

    It’s Thursday! And you know what that means… It’s Linux Day on the Lunduke Hour! In today’s episode Matt Hartley and I take a boat load of questions from the viewers on BtrFS, KDE, Internet Privacy, the ending of the Linux Action Show, Linux Marketing issues, and the weirdness (or lack of weirdness) of Linux.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • OpenShot 2.3 Video Editor Released
  • OpenShot 2.3 Released With Transform & Razor Tools

    A new version of OpenShot video editor is available to download. OpenShot 2.3 adds a transform tool, improves timeline zoom, and a whole lot more.

  • Museeks Music Player Adds Native Notifications, Tray Applet, More

    It’s been nearly 6 months since we last heard from Museeks, a stylish cross-platform desktop music player.

  • 2 open source Adobe InDesign scripts

    For my job, I must use InDesign. For freelance work, I use InDesign, Scribus, GIMP, and Photoshop, depending on whether I am creating the artwork or starting with someone else's work.

    [...]

    Before I started looking for a solution to my PDF question, I had never considered using open source solutions to customize Adobe InDesign. After this exploration, I have expanded my knowledge of open source capabilities and just how valuable and useful open source solutions are, even when working in conjunction with a closed source application.

  • Telegram Voice Calls Are Coming to Desktop Linux App

    Messaging app Telegram is rolling out encrypted voice calls to its mobile apps, but has confirmed that Telegram desktop will also get the feature.

  • Does Adobe Hate Linux?

    As the press prepares to cover the release of Ubuntu 17.04, it should be clear in the tech industry just how big of a player Ubuntu is to the ecosystem. While a good bit of reviews will focus on what’s new in the release and what’s headed down the pipeline, I’d like to comment on what’s still missing and better yet, what can be done about it.

    What’s missing is a graphics suite and there’s really no excuse for not having one. Yes, we have graphics applications, but there are advantages to having a suite, not just a one-off application that can do something in 12 steps when its competitor can do it in three. The industry leader in this market is Adobe, whose Creative Cloud suite is leaps and bounds away from its competitors in terms of market share.

More in Tux Machines

GNOME and Fedora

  • RFC: Integrating rsvg-rs into librsvg
    I have started an RFC to integrate rsvg-rs into librsvg. rsvg-rs is the Rust binding to librsvg. Like the gtk-rs bindings, it gets generated from a pre-built GIR file.
  • 1+ year of Fedora and GNOME hardware enablement
    A year and a couple of months ago, Christian Schaller asked me to pivot a little bit from working full time on Fleet Commander to manage a new team we were building to work on client hardware enablement for Fedora and GNOME with an emphasis on upstream. The idea was to fill the gap in the organization where nobody really owned the problem of bringing up new client hardware features vertically across the stack (from shell down to the kernel), or rather, ensure Fedora and GNOME both work great on modern laptops. Part of that deal was to take over the bootloader and start working closer to customers and hardware manufacturing parnters.
  • Fedora Atomic Workstation: Works on the beach
    My trip is getting really close, so I decided to upgrade my system to rawhide. Wait, what ? That is usually what everybody would tell you not to do. Rawhide has this reputation for frequent breakage, and who knows if my apps will work any given day. Not something you want to deal with while traveling.
  • 4 cool new projects to try in COPR for February

Why You Shouldn’t Use Firefox Forks (and Proprietary Opera)

  • Why You Shouldn’t Use Firefox Forks Like Waterfox, Pale Moon, or Basilisk
    Mozilla Firefox is an open source project, so anyone can take its code, modify it, and release a new browser. That’s what Waterfox, Pale Moon, and Basilisk are—alternative browsers based on the Firefox code. But we recommend against using any of them.
  • Opera Says Its Next Opera Release Will Have the Fastest Ad Blocker on the Block
    Opera Software promoted today its upcoming Opera 52 web browser to the beta channel claiming that it has the faster ad blocker on the market compared to previous Opera release and Google Chrome. One of the key highlights of the Opera 52 release will be the improved performance of the built-in ad blocker as Opera claims to have enhanced the string matching algorithm of the ad blocker to make it open web pages that contain ads much faster than before, and, apparently than other web browsers, such as Chrome.

Graphics: Glxinfo, ANV, SPIR-V

  • Glxinfo Gets Updated With OpenGL 4.6 Support, More vRAM Reporting
    The glxinfo utility is handy for Linux users in checking on their OpenGL driver in use by their system and related information. But it's not often that glxinfo itself gets updated, except that changed today with the release of mesa-demos-8.4.0 as the package providing this information utility. Mesa-demos is the collection of glxinfo, eglinfo, glxgears, and utilities related to Mesa. With the Mesa-demos 8.4.0 it is predominantly glxinfo updates.
  • Intel ANV Getting VK_KHR_16bit_storage Support Wrapped Up
    Igalia's Jose Maria Casanova Crespo sent out a set of patches today for fixes that allow for the enabling of the VK_KHR_16bit_storage extension within Intel's ANV Vulkan driver. The patches are here for those interested in 16-bit storage support in Vulkan. This flips on the features for storageBuffer16BitAccess, uniformAndStorageBuffer16BitAccess, storagePushConstant16 and the VK_KHR_16bit_storage extension. This support is present for Intel "Gen 8" Broadwell graphics and newer. Hopefully the work will be landing in Mesa Git soon.
  • SPIR-V Support For Gallium3D's Clover Is Closer To Reality
    It's been a busy past week for open-source GPU compute with Intel opening up their new NEO OpenCL stack, Karol Herbst at Red Hat posting the latest on Nouveau NIR support for SPIR-V compute, and now longtime Nouveau contributor Pierre Moreau has presented his latest for SPIR-V Clover support. Pierre has been spending about the past year adding SPIR-V support to Gallium3D's "Clover" OpenCL state tracker. SPIR-V, of course, is the intermediate representation used now by OpenCL and Vulkan.

Security: Updates, Tinder, FUD and KPTI Meltdown Mitigation

  • Security updates for Friday
  • Tinder vulnerability let hackers [sic] take over accounts with just a phone number

    The attack worked by exploiting two separate vulnerabilities: one in Tinder and another in Facebook’s Account Kit system, which Tinder uses to manage logins. The Account Kit vulnerability exposed users’ access tokens (also called an “aks” token), making them accessible through a simple API request with an associated phone number.

  • PSA: Improperly Secured Linux Servers Targeted with Chaos Backdoor [Ed: Drama queen once again (second time in a week almost) compares compromised GNU/Linux boxes to "back doors"]
    Hackers are using SSH brute-force attacks to take over Linux systems secured with weak passwords and are deploying a backdoor named Chaos. Attacks with this malware have been spotted since June, last year. They have been recently documented and broken down in a GoSecure report.
  • Another Potential Performance Optimization For KPTI Meltdown Mitigation
    Now that the dust is beginning to settle around the Meltdown and Spectre mitigation techniques on the major operating systems, in the weeks and months ahead we are likely to see more performance optimizations come to help offset the performance penalties incurred by mitigations like kernel page table isolation (KPTI) and Retpolines. This week a new patch series was published that may help with KPTI performance.