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April 2017

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • The Atom Editor

    I didn’t set out to write a blog post about a text editor. I was going to write about one of the other awesome projects that the Ops team is doing here at Wombat. Along the way I decided to give Atom a chance again and I’m glad I did. I enjoyed it enough that I thought I would defer my post about automating my “Ops Environment” on a mac (I promise, I’ll do that one soon-ish) in favor of this.

  • Quick Update: ClipGrab and PlayOnLinux Applications Are Now Available For ALL Ubuntu Versions

    ClipGrab is fairly popular application to download video from famous sites of the Internet. It allows you to search video with in application and select to download the video or other way you can copy and paste the video URL to the application to download the video. Since famous video sites are supported by this application, if some site isn't officially supported, you may still be able to download the videos from it.

  • aTunes Enriched Audio Player Now Available For All Current Ubuntu/Linux Mint Versions

    There are wide variety of audio players available for Linux and you may have your favorite one installed on your system. aTunes is not new audio player but its initial release was way back in 2006 and the most recent version was released in June, 2014. In almost two years there is no news on the website or release from developers, well it is open-source released under GPL-V2 license and we don't see any other to carry on the development of this great application. It is written in Java programming language and it's cross-platform available for Linux, Unix, Windows and Mac. It uses Mplayer as its playback engine and supports wide variety of known formats such as: MP3, Ogg Vorbis, FLAC, WMA and other formats.

QNX 7 Can Be Fitted With A Qt5 Desktop

Filed under
OS
  • QNX 7 Can Be Fitted With A Qt5 Desktop

    While QNX remains targeted as an operating system for mobile/embedded solutions, a BlackBerry developer in his spare time has fitted QNX 7 with a Qt5 desktop.

    QNX 6 and prior had a desktop option, but was removed in QNX 7, which was released this past March. QNX 7.0 also brought support for 64-bit (and maintaining 32-bit) Intel x86 and ARM platforms along with C++14 support. For those wanting to experiment with QNX 7, a BlackBerry kernel developer has been working on making this operating system more desktop friendly.

  • Building a BlackBerry QNX 7 Desktop

    Having Qt allowed me to port one of my favourite applications, SpeedCrunch. It was a simple matter of running ‘qmake’ followed by ‘make’. Next, I ported the QTermWidget library so that I could have terminal windows.

Kernel Space/Linux

Filed under
Linux
  • Kernel explained
  • [Older] [Video] Audio on Linux: The End of a Golden Age?
  • State of Sway April 2017

    Development on Sway continues. I thought we would have slowed down a lot more by now, but every release still comes with new features - Sway 0.12 added redshift support and binary space partitioning layouts. Sway 0.13.0 is coming soon and includes, among other things, nvidia proprietary driver support. We already have some interesting features slated for Sway 0.14.0, too!

    Today Sway has 21,446 lines of C (and 4,261 lines of header files) written by 81 authors across 2,263 commits. These were written through 653 pull requests and 529 issues. Sway packages are available today in the official repos of pretty much every distribution except for Debian derivatives, and a PPA is available for those guys.

Supporting Burning Platforms

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • Surface revenue does a U-boat, and dives

    Revenue generated by Microsoft's Surface hardware during the March quarter was down 26% from the same period the year before, the company said yesterday as it briefed Wall Street.

    For the quarter, Surface produced $831 million, some $285 million less than the March quarter of 2016, for the largest year-over-year dollar decline ever.

  • Acer said to me: "do not use our products with Linux. Find another manufacturer"

    Last year, I bought an Acer notebook and it came with Windows 10.

    As I didn't want spyware neither bloatware, I got Linux installed and asked for a refund of the OEM license. After a little of talking, they were wanting to charge me US$100 (to remove the license, which I already had wiped, as I got FDE Linux installed) to refund US$70 of the OEM license.

    This year, wondering to buy a new Acer notebook, I asked them again if they would refund me the OEM license without all the hassle (as they did pay me the US$70, without me having to pay the US$100).

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • LibreOffice the better Office, really?
  • A serious bug in GCC

    This post is to inform you about a bug in GCC that may cause memory (or other resource) leaks in your valid C++ programs.

  • [Older] Supporting Bangladesh’s software industry with Indian cooperation

    It’s worth noting that the word “free” in free/open-source software implies not just free of cost, but also freedom from commercial dependence upon multi-national software vendors.

    To emphasise this, the biography of Richard Stallman, the founder of the free software movement which ultimately produced the Linux operating system, is titled Free as in Freedom.

    In fact, it is impossible to run a modern government without computers; so it should not be acceptable that sovereign nations like Bangladesh be forever dependent on foreign IT vendors, especially when the Linux alternative offers both freedom and zero-cost.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Is there any way to truly secure Docker container contents?

    All this adds up to a lot of work, which is not taken care of for you by default in Docker. It is no surprise that many Docker images are insecure, given this picture. The unfortunate reality is that many Docker containers are running with known vulnerabilities that have known fixes, but just aren’t, and that’s sad.

  • Compromise recovery on Qubes OS

    Occasionally fuckups happen, even with Qubes (although not as often as some think).

    What should we – users or admins – do in such a situation? Patch, obviously. But is that really enough? What good is patching your system if it might have already been compromised a week earlier, before the patch was released, when an adversary may have learned of the bug and exploited it?

    That’s an inconvenient question for many of us – computer security professionals – to answer. Usually we would mutter something about Raising the Bar(TM), the high costs of targeted attacks, attackers not wanting to burn 0-days, or only nation state actors being able to afford such attacks, and that in case one is on their list of targets, the game is over anyway and no point in fighting. Plus some classic cartoon.

    While the above line of defense might work (temporarily), it really doesn’t provide for much comfort, long term, I think. We need better answers and better solutions. This post, together with a recently introduced feature in Qubes OS 3.2 and (upcoming) 4.0, is an attempt to offer such a solution.

  • Top 5 Kali Linux Pentest tools for WiFi/network and exploits
  • Linux/Shishiga Malware Brute-Forces SSH Credentials

    A new strain of Linux malware has been detected. Dubbed Linux/Shishiga, the malware could transform into a dangerous piece of malware. Linux/Shishiga was officially discovered and examined by researchers at Eset.

  • Cybercriminals have taken notice of leaked government spying techniques
  • Microsoft Closes Word/Wordpad Hole—6 Months after Report
  • [Older] The Pentagon’s Bug Bounty Program Should Be Expanded to Bases, DOD Official Says [iophk: "any version of Windows at all is inappropriate"]

    “About 75 percent of the devices that are control systems are on Windows XP or other nonsupported operating systems,” said Daryl Haegley, program manager for the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Energy, Installations and Environment.

    [...]

    “A lot of these systems are still Windows 95 or 98, and that’s OK—if they’re not connected to the internet,” Haegley added.

  • Don’t Info Op Until You See The Whites of Their Eyes
  • CFP P70

    This is the official CFP for P70.

  • VM escape - QEMU Case Study

    In this paper, we provide a in-depth analysis of CVE-2015-5165 (a memory-leak vulnerability) and CVE-2015-7504 (a heap-based overflow vulnerability), along with working exploits. The combination of these two exploits allows to break out from a VM and execute code on the target host. We discuss the technical details to exploit the vulnerabilities on QEMU's network card device emulation, and provide generic techniques that could be re-used to exploit future bugs in QEMU.

  • CIA’s anti-leaking tool leaked as ‘whistleblowers watch the watchers’

    Former MI5 intelligence officer Annie Machon and retired US Army Colonel Ann Wright, who is also a retired US State Department official, shared their views on these and other questions with RT.

    On Friday, WikiLeaks released a series of documentations on a US Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) project known as ‘Scribbles,’ which was allegedly created to allow ‘web beacon’ tags to be embedded “into documents that are likely to be copied.”

    WikiLeaks began publishing a huge cache of secret documents on the CIA named ‘Vault 7’ in March.

  • Vault 7: CIA tool to track people through Word docs released

    The documentation says: "Scribbles (SCRIB) is a document watermarking tool that can be used to batch process a number of documents in a pre-seeded input directory. It generates a random watermark for each document, inserts that watermark into the document, saves all such processed documents in an output directory, and creates a log file which identifies the watermarks inserted into each document."

    It says the tool was successfully tested on Office 2013 (on Windows 8.1 x64), documents from Office versions 97-2016 (Office 95 documents will not work!) and documents that are not locked forms, encrypted, or password-protected.

    There is a limitation to the Scribbles system: if a document that has the watermarks in it and is opened in OpenOffice, LibreOffice the watermark images and URLs may become visible.

  • The US Takes On the World in NATO’s Cyber War Games

    Last year, Capt. Sean Ruddy and his team of operator-soldiers from the US Cyber Brigade entered a Locked Shields, a NATO-organized cyber-defense war game that pits teams from dozens of countries against “live-fire” attacks. It was their first time. And of the 19 countries represented, the US finished dead last. This week, they got their shot at redemption.

Anbox Runs Android In Your Linux Without Emulation

Filed under
Linux

​In a recent article, we talked about android emulators for Ubuntu or Linux in general. Most of the time we need to play a game or try some applications on android or even when we don’t have a smartphone we opt to use an emulator to try applications. A fan on facebook let us know about Anbox and asked for the tutorial on Anbox installation in Linux. So here you have how to install Anbox in Linux.

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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • cairo release 1.16.0 now available
    After four years of development since 1.14.0, version 1.16.0 of the cairo 2D graphics library has been released.
  • Cairo 1.16 Released With OpenGL ES 3.0 Support, Colored Emojis
    It's been four years since the debut of the Cairo 1.14 stable series and today that has been succeeded by Cairo 1.16. Cairo, as a reminder, is the vector graphics library for 2D drawing and supports back-ends ranging from OpenGL to PDF, PostScript, DirectFB, and SVG outputs. Cairo is used by the likes of the GTK+ tool-kit, Mozilla's Gecko engine, Gnuplot, Poppler, and many other open-source projects.
  • Open source MDM offers flexibility, with challenges
    Open source platforms may require more effort from IT than commercial products do, but they can also address an organization's specific requirements -- if the company is willing to invest in the necessary resources. The open source mobile device management (MDM) market is very limited, but there are a few options. If organizations determine that an open source platform is worth the effort, then they can weigh a few different options for open source MDM tools.
  • Three-Year Moziversary
    Another year at Mozilla. They certainly don’t slow down the more you have of them. For once a year of stability, organization-wise. The two biggest team changes were the addition of Jan-Erik back on March 1, and the loss of our traditional team name “Browser Measurement II” for a more punchy and descriptive “Firefox Telemetry Team.”
  • Citus Data donates 1% equity to non-profit PostgreSQL orgs
    There’s open source and there’s open source. There’s genuine free and open source software (FOSS) and then there’s largely locked down proprietary non-dynamic library open source that is generally supplied as a commercially supported version of an open source kernel base that doesn’t see whole lot of real world code commits — and, no, there’s no acronym for that. Then, there’s other ways of evidencing real open openness such as non-technical contributions (could be language translation/localisation etc.) and then there’s plain old contributions. Scale-out Postgres database technologies ​​​​Citus Data is donating 1 percent of its equity to non-profit PostgreSQL organisations in the US and Europe.
  • Pagely NorthStack Makes WordPress Serverless
    WordPress is getting the serverless treatment, thanks to a new effort from managed WordPress hosting provider Pagely. The new NorthStack platform disaggregates the usual stack that WordPress requires into a series of services that largely run on serverless infrastructure at Amazon Web Services (AWS). The NorthStack effort is an attempt to lower the fixed costs and infrastructure needed to deploy and run WordPress. "WordPress itself is based on 12-year-old code. It does not want to be in a serverless environment," Joshua Strebel, CEO of Pagely, told eWEEK. "WordPress wants to live on one AWS EC2 node up next to its database with everything all contained in it."
  • Why Open Source Healthcare is Vital for Innovation
    Dana Lewis’ story is far from being a rarity. The diabetes industry is one of the worst offenders for overcharging or price gouging medication and equipment for patients. This is leading many individuals to take the same path as Dana Lewis. Open source platforms like OpenAPS, GitHub pages, and social media offer DIYers step-by-step instructions on how to build their own artificial pancreas tools. Kate Farnsworth built a DIY monitor device that keeps blood sugar levels of her diabetic daughter in constant check This tool, that has dramatically improved the life of a 15-year-old Sydney, cost her mom just $250.
  • The EU has approved Microsoft’s $7.5 billion GitHub acquisition
     

    Microsoft’s upcoming $7.5 billion acquisition of GitHub has cleared another major hurdle: the EU has approved the deal after determining that there are no antitrust concerns in Microsoft buying the popular open-source software repository, via the Financial Times.  

  • EU watchdog waves through Microsoft's GitHub takeover
     

    The EC noted that, in making its decision, it probed whether Microsoft would leverage the popularity of GitHut to boost sales of its own DevOps tools and cloud services, and looked into whether Microsoft would have the ability and incentive to further integrate its own DevOps tools and cloud services with GitHub while limiting integration with third parties' DevOps tools and cloud services.

  • Microsoft’s $7.5BN GitHub buy gets green-lit by EU regulators
     

    The Commission decided Microsoft would have no incentive to undermine the GitHub’s openness — saying any attempt to do so would reduce its value for developers, who the Commission judged as willing and able to switch to other platforms.

  • EU clears Microsoft acquisition of GitHub
  • Doing your civic duty one line of code at a time
    When it comes to doing our civic duty in today's technologically driven world, there is a perception that we don't care like older generations did. History teaches us that in the early 20th century's New Deal, Americans stepped up to the nation's challenges on a wide range of government-financed public works projects. Airport construction. Infrastructure improvements. Building dams, bridges, hospitals. This was more than just individuals "pulling themselves up by their bootstraps" but, by design, performing incredible civic duties. Quite an amazing feat when you think about it.

Security: U.S. CMS Breach and New Security Woes for Popular 'IoT' Protocols

  • U.S. CMS says 75,000 individuals' files accessed in data breach
  • CMS Responding to Suspicious Activity in Agent and Broker Exchanges Portal

    At this time, we believe that approximately 75,000 individuals’ files were accessed. While this is a small fraction of consumer records present on the FFE, any breach of our system is unacceptable.

  • New Security Woes for Popular IoT Protocols
    Researchers at Black Hat Europe will detail denial-of-service and other flaws in MQTT, CoAP machine-to-machine communications protocols that imperil industrial and other IoT networks online. Security researcher Federico Maggi had been collecting data – some of it sensitive in nature – from hundreds of thousands of Message Queuing Telemetry Transport (MQTT) servers he found sitting wide open on the public Internet via Shodan. "I would probe them and listen for 10 seconds or so, and just collect data from them," he says. He found data on sensors and other devices sitting in manufacturing and automotive networks, for instance, as well as typical consumer Internet of Things (IoT) gadgets. The majority of data, Maggi says, came from consumer devices and sensors or was data he couldn’t identify. "There was a good amount of data from factories, and I was able to find data coming from pretty expensive industrial machines, including a robot," he says.

BSD: FreeBSD 12.0 Beta and Upgrading OpenBSD with Ansible

Graphics: XRGEARS and Arcan's Latest

  • XRGEARS: Infamous "Gears" Now On VR Headsets With OpenHMD, Vulkan
    Well, the virtual reality (VR) demo scene is now complete with having glxgears-inspired gears and Utah teapot rendering on VR head mounted displays with the new XRGEARS. Kidding aside about the gears and teapot, XRGEARS is a nifty new open-source project with real value by Collabora developer Lubosz Sarnecki. XRGEARS is a standalone VR demo application built using the OpenHMD initiative for tracking and Vulkan for rendering. XRGEARS supports both Wayland and X11 environments or even running off KMS itself. This code also makes use of VK_EXT_direct_mode_display with DRM leasing.
  • Arcan versus Xorg – Approaching Feature Parity
    This is the first article out of three in a series where I will go through what I consider to be the relevant Xorg feature set, and compare it, point by point, to how the corresponding solution or category works in Arcan. This article will solely focus on the Display Server set of features and how they relate to Xorg features, The second article will cover the features that are currently missing (e.g. network transparency) when they have been accounted for. The third article will cover the features that are already present in Arcan (and there are quite a few of those) but does not exist in Xorg.
  • Arcan Display Server Is Nearing Feature Parity With The X.Org Server
    The Arcan display server, which started off years ago sounding like a novelty with being a display server built off a game engine in part and other interesting features, is nearing feature parity with the X.Org Server. While most hobbyist display server projects have failed, Arcan has continued advancing and with an interesting feature set. Recently they have even been working on a virtual reality desktop and an interesting desktop in general. Arcan is getting close to being able to offering the same functionality as a traditional X.Org Server. If you are interested in a lengthy technical read about the differences between Arcan and X.Org, the Arcan developers themselves did some comparing and contrasting when it comes to the display support, windowing, input, font management, synchronization, and other areas.