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April 2017

Coming Soon in Firefox

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • If Firefox 57 would be released today, 2273 add-ons would be compatible

    The Firefox web browser is in a bit of a moving state right now in regards to the browser's add-on system and add-ons that are available for it.

    Mozilla plans to make Firefox 57 the first version of the browser that supports only WebExtensions. WebExtensions in plain old English are very similar to Google Chrome extensions, only that the Firefox version supports more powerful add-ons than Google Chrome does once Mozilla reaches feature parity with Chrome.

  • Firefox gets “Always open in Container” option

    Containers is a new feature of the Firefox web browser that is currently being tested and in active development.

    The feature allows you to launch websites and services in containers to separate them from one another in various ways.

  • These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 15

There won’t be a Replicant 6.0 SDK because there is already something better

Filed under
Android
Development

And you can help making it accessible to more GNU/Linux users!

We have decided not to create a Replicant 6.0 SDK as part of the upcoming Replicant 6.0 release. For three previous Replicant versions (2.2, 4.0 and 4.2), a SDK was provided.

Replicant offered its own SDK because the Android SDK released by Google is distributed under a non-free license and suggests installing non-free plug-ins such as the Google APIs. For a long time, Replicant has provided the only Android SDK that is available under a free license and that doesn’t offer to install non-free software.

Read more

Also: Halium is in the air!

Desktop Themes

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Numix White Icons Looks Better On Dark Themes, Install In Ubuntu/Linux Mint Via PPA
  • Make Your Gnome Shell Kind Of Look Like Unity With United Gnome Theme

    Beside theme you can install these extensions to make desktop look more like Unity. Dash to dock: Enable panel mode and position it on the left; Dynamic Panel Transparency: The non-dark variant comes with a semi-transparent panel. Square icons used in the following screenshots.

  • Albatross Theme Forked From Shimmer Project For Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    It is glad to see that theme development is much faster now than past. Albatross theme is forked from Shimmer project team, they stopped the development long ago. If you want to keep your desktop simple, clean and elegant then for sure this theme is for you, it is specially targeting Gnome desktop and may work with Xfce. Currently this theme is compatible with Gtk 3.24+/3.22/3.20. If you intend to use this theme in the Xfce desktop then you must use xfwm4 from "Greybird/Adwaita" since that is not packed with this theme. Since this theme is in active development, if you encounter any bug or problem with this theme then report it to get it fixed. Obsidian-1 icons used in the following screenshot.

  • Pop Theme Suite: Make Your Ubuntu/Linux Look Like System76 Upcoming Desktop

    As I mentioned in my previous posts that lots theme development going on now but Linux community and a company is not even behind called "System76". Well they designed theme and icons for their own computers that run Ubuntu but good news is that it is free and comes under GPL-V2 license that means anyone can copy, share or remake their theme suite.

Hands on with the Pinebook

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Reviews

The Pine A64 was a 64-bit Quad-Core Single Board Computer which was kickstarted at the tail end of 2015 for delivery in the middle of 2016. Costing just $15, and hailed as a “Raspberry Pi killer,” the board raised $1.7 million from 36,000 backers. It shipped to its backers to almost universally poor reviews.

Now they’re back, this time with a laptop—a 11.6-inch model for $89, or a 14-inch model for $99. Both are powered by the same 64-bit Quad-Core ARM Cortex A53 as the original Pine A64 board, but at least Pine are doing a much better job this time around of managing user expectations.

Read more

Linux, Graphics, and Tonight's Release

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 4.11 Set To Be Released Today

    After it was postponed last weekend, the Linux 4.11 kernel is set to be officially released in a matter of hours.

    As of writing, the Linux 4.11 codename remains the "Fearless Coyote", but there is the possibility that Torvalds may rename it when tagging the official 4.11.0 release today.

  • Linux Kernel 3.18.51 Released with MIPS, ARM, and CIFS Changes, Updated Drivers
  • Linux Kernel 4.4.65 LTS Is a Small Patch with Networking and File System Fixes
  • USB Type-C Port Manager Coming To Linux 4.12

    Another feature to look forward to with the Linux 4.12 kernel for those using newer hardware featuring USB Type-C is a port manager.

    The "TCPM" driver is queued as a new staging driver via usb-next for entering the Linux 4.12 kernel in the next two weeks. This USB Type-C Port Manager driver implements a power delivery state machine for source/sink ports. This driver serves as a state machine while other USB Type-C drivers are responsible for the rest of the functionality.

  • DirectFB Is Back To Being Dormant

    Back in August of 2015, DirectFB disappeared with its project site and code vanishing. Last November DirectFB re-appeared along with a new site and renewed focus on the project. Unfortunately, it's once again gone silent.

    With all the news this month about Ubuntu dropping Mir / Unity 8 and the continued work by many different desktop/compositor teams on Wayland, I was curious this weekend to check on how DirectFB is doing in 2017... Sadly, DirectFB.net as the new DirectFB site launched last November is now down again. The original DirectFB (dot) org web-site remains squatted. I've been unable to find any other "new" DirectFB website.

  • Sway Wayland Compositor Adding Proprietary NVIDIA Driver Support

    The Sway Wayland compositor that aims to be i3-compatible continues picking up new features.

GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME
  • GNOME's JavaScript Component Will Be Seeing More Improvements For 3.26

    GJS -- the GNOME JavaScript system that allows for GObject introspection and other capabilities via JavaScript on the desktop -- is planning for further improvements with GNOME 3.26.

  • Show desktop icon in Gnome 3 - Where and how

    Despite my recently found liking for Gnome 3, largely because of Fedora 24 and Fedora 25, plus some rigorous work with extensions like Dash to Dock, it is still a highly inefficient desktop environment. The unnecessary touch emphasis is there, regardless of what anyone says, and it makes things difficult.

    For instance, Show desktop. This is an action slash widget in pretty much every other desktop, and despite occasional setbacks and regressions, it's always been there, a loyal companion in the moment of need. Not so in Gnome 3. Not just hidden. Not there at all. And what if you want it? Far from trivial. Hence this tutorial.

  • There's a script that makes the GNOME launcher a bit more organised

    I follow a great many sources for news and one that popped up in my feed is the 'gnome-dash-fix' script. It sorts out the mess that is the GNOME application launcher.

Leftovers: KDE and Qt

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE neon CMake Package Validation

    In KDE neon‘s constant quest of raising the quality bar of KDE software and neon itself, I added a new tool to our set of quality assurance tools. CMake Package QA is meant to ensure that find_package() calls on CMake packages provided by config files (e.g. FooConfig.cmake files) do actually work.

  • Aether Icon Theme
  • Krita 2017 Survey Results

    A bit later than planned, but here are the 2017 Krita Survey results! We wanted to know a lot of things, like, what kind of hardware and screen resolution are most common, what drawing tablets were most common, and which ones gave most trouble. We had more than 1000 responses! Here’s a short summary, for the full report, head to Krita User Survey Report.

  • Cutelyst 1.6.0 released, to infinity and beyond!

    Once 1.5.0 was release I thought the next release would be a small one, it started with a bunch of bug fixes, Simon Wilper made a contribution to Utils::Sql, basically when things get out to production you find bugs, so there were tons of fixes to WSGI module.

  • LaKademy 2017 just started!

    The Latin America KDE Summit, LaKademy, just started today in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil. The country is in the middle of a general strike, which I’m supporting, but the LaKademy couldn’t stop. We’ve been organizing this meeting for a year.

  • KDE Connect from the eyes of a newbie... What sorcery is this?

    Of course, I inferred it was something to connect a phone and a PC in some way and enabling the swapping of files in between the two devices, but I really did not care much about it. After all, that is what bluetooth is for, right?

    Today, I decided to give it a try on PCLOS.

  • 9 months of Atelier project, almost time to launch(or not) =D
  • Nextcloud Plugin for QuickShare

    So after a long hiatus I chose the Plasma QuickShare applet (which is sort of the Plasma5 replacement for the old Pastebin Plasmoid) as my point of re-entry into KDE code work. There was after all a deal of itches there I wanted scratched. It’s been quite a bit of fun figuring out the various interesting frameworks QuickShare is connected to at the backend. Anyways, some days ago I got a rudimentary Nextcloud plugin past review and pushed it, which should mean it’ll soon be coming to a 5.10-powered desktop near you Smile

  • QNX as a desktop operating system

    On his spare time, Elad Lahav (a kernel developer at BlackBerry) built an experimental Qt-based desktop environment to try and see if he could use QNX as a desktop operating system. And it works!

  • Performance regression testing of Qt Quick

    We recently added a new toy to The Qt Project, and I wanted to give an overview on what it is and how it can be used.

  • Qt World Summit 2017 Call for Presentations
  • Give us a proper mimetype name for OpenCL C files!

    KDevelop, your cross-platform IDE, since version 5.1 has initial OpenCL language support.

Oh Snap – to boldly package where no one has packaged before

Filed under
Ubuntu

One of the great disadvantages of the Linux desktop is its software distribution mechanism. While the overall concept of central software repos works great and has been adapted into powerful Stores in commercial products, deploying and using programs, delivered as packages, is a tricky business. It stems from the wider fragmentation of the distro ecospace, and it essence, it means that if you want to release your product, you must compile it 150 odd ways, not just for different distributions but also for different versions of the same distribution. Naturally, this model scares away the big game.

Recently though, there have been several attempts to make Linux packages more cross-distro and minimize the gap between distributions. The name of the game: Snap, and we’ve tasted this app-container framework before. It is unto Linux what, well, Windows stuff is unto Windows, in a way. Not quite statically compiled stuff, but definitely independent. I had it tested again in Ubuntu 17.04, and it would appear that Snap is getting more and more traction. Let’s have another look.

Read more

Kubuntu 17.04 - the next generation

Filed under
KDE
Reviews

As usual, Kubuntu 17.04 does not give you any surprises. It is stable and reliable. It is reasonably resource-hungry. There are no wonders in this new release. Just a well-rounded distribution for everyday use.

Yes, there are small bugs or inconveniences here and there, but they are not huge and can be easily fixed, replaced or lived with. The biggest of them for me, of course, is the lack of multimedia codecs. You can heal that easily.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

OpenWrt 19.07.0 first release candidate

The OpenWrt community is proud to announce the first release candidate of the upcoming OpenWrt 19.07 stable version series. It incorporates over 3700 commits since branching the previous OpenWrt 18.06 release and has been under development for about one a half years. With this release the OpenWrt project brings all supported targets back to a single common kernel version and further refines and broadens existing device support. It also provides initial support for the new ath79 target, the future device tree based successor of the popular ar71xx target. Read more Also: OpenWrt 19.07 RC Offers WPA3 Configuration Support, All Targets On Same Kernel Version

OnLogic Karbon 700: Passively-Cooled, Up To 8 Core / 16 Thread Industrial & Rugged PC

OnLogic (formerly known as Logic Supply until a recent rebranding) announced the Karbon 700 back in August as a durable Linux-friendly computer largely intended for industrial applications but nothing prevents the user from using it as a passively, well-built desktop PC either. OnLogic recently sent over the Karbon 700 and it's been working out very well even with passively cooling an Intel Xeon eight-core / sixteen-thread processor, 16GB of RAM, 512GB NVMe storage, and more. In suiting the Karbon 700 for industrial applications, this high-performance rugged computer supports power over Ethernet (PoE), wireless, the ability to have an external graphics card (though that variant is no longer fanless), CAN bus support, dual COM RS-232, 8-bit DIO, and other interfaces in addition to triple Gigabit LAN, triple DisplayPort, USB 3.1 Gen 1, and other connectivity options. Read more

5 Eye-Catching GTK Themes by Vinceliuice

Few GTK theme makers are as prolific as ~vinceliuice, an open source designer based in Jinan, China. Vince’s theme portfolio is wildly unlike anyone else’s. It’s packed full of eye catching designs boasting dramatic visual elements and modern design sensibilities. So good, in fact, that I’ve written this post to spotlight 5 of the best themes made by vinceliuice — themes that showcase this designer’s colourful creativity and theme crafting skill. Read more