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May 2017

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

An Early Look At Debian 9.0 Performance vs. Debian 8.8, Ubuntu 17.04, CentOS 7, Clear Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Debian

Debian 9.0 has settled on the Linux 4.9 kernel, GNOME Shell 3.22 desktop by default, X.Org Server 1.19.2, Mesa 13.0.6 (yes, sadly not Mesa 17.0 or 17.1), GCC 6.3.0 and is using an EXT4 file-system by default. With Debian 9 is also the switch from ACPI CPUFreq to P-State for CPU frequency scaling on newer Intel hardware, which is why the CPU frequency of this Skylake test system is reflected differently between them on the system table.

Read more

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Tech pro cautions on attribution of cyber attacks
  • Cyber crime to cost business US$8 trillion: Juniper

    The report, by Juniper Research, also forecasts that the number of personal data records stolen by cyber criminals will reach 2.8 billion in 2017, and almost double to 5 billion in 2020.

  • Russian Hackers Are Using Google’s Own Infrastructure to Hack Gmail Users

    The “Change Password” button linked to a short URL from the Tiny.cc link shortener service, a Bitly competitor. But the hackers cleverly disguised it as a legitimate link by using Google’s Accelerated Mobile Pages, or AMP. This is a service hosted by the internet giant that was originally designed to speed up web pages on mobile, especially for publishers. In practice, it works by creating a copy of a website’s page on Google’s servers, but it also acts as an open redirect.

  • The sudo tty bug and procps
  • Improving Linux Security with DevSecOps

    Ask people who run IT departments these days what keeps them up at night, and they'll probably tell you it's security—or the lack of it. With the explosive growth of malicious attacks on everything from hospitals to Fortune 500s, security—not hardware, software and even staff—is what currently makes life miserable.

    That's why organizations of all sizes are looking to change fundamentally how they do security. It's no longer a single team's job to make sure systems are secure and internal auditing is good enough to identify and mitigate attacks. Today, everyone is responsible for security, which is the guiding principal of DevSecOps.

    Just as in DevOps, which aims to speed the development of software by improving collaboration and balancing the competing interests of operations teams and developers, DevSecOps seeks to get everyone thinking about security together and up front. Trying to bake in security after systems are built and code is deployed is simply too late.

21-Way NVIDIA Fermi/Kepler/Maxwell/Pascal OpenCL GPU Comparison

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

    The tested GPUs included the:

    MSI NVIDIA GeForce GTX 460 768MB
    eVGA NVIDIA GeForce GT 520 1024MB
    Zotac NVIDIA GeForce GT 610 1024MB
    MSI NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 1024MB
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 680 2048MB
    eVGA NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750 1024MB
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750 Ti 2048MB
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 760 2048MB
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 Ti 3072MB
    eVGA NVIDIA GeForce GTX 950 2048MB
    eVGA NVIDIA GeForce GTX 960 2048MB
    eVGA NVIDIA GeForce GTX 970 4096MB
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 980 4096MB
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 980 Ti 6144MB
    MSI NVIDIA GeForce GT 1030 2048MB
    Zotac NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 2048MB
    eVGA NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Ti 4096MB
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 6GB 6144MB
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 8192MB
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 8192MB
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti 11264MB

    Read more

KDE: Krita, FreeBSD, Cutelyst 1.7.0, and Qt

Filed under
KDE
  • Krita 3.1.4 Open-Source Digital Painting App Improves Loading of GIMP 2.9 Files

    Krita 3.1.4 is here as the latest bugfix and stability release of the popular application, which is loved by amateur and professional digital artists alike, and it's a recommended update for anyone using Krita 3.1.3 or a previous version from the Krita 3.1 series. It has been released for all supported platforms.

  • Moving KDE-FreeBSD ports infrastructure

    We’re updating the documentation (in the KDE Community Wiki), but mostly things will be simpler, and it may make sense to simply checkout /usr/ports from the KDE-FreeBSD ports tree instead of anything else. We’ll continue to call it “Area51”, even if that string doesn’t occur in its name anymore.

  • Cutelyst 1.7.0 released! WebSocket support added.

    WebSocket support is probably a key feature to have on a modern web framework, Perl Catalyst doesn’t look like it wasn’t designed with it in mind, the way I found to do WS there wasn’t intuitive.

  • QProcess Or KProcess ?

    Most of the time of community bonding period was spent giving college exams. By the time my exams got over, I only had a week left to make something useful of the community bonding period time.

  • Qt 5.9 Launches as Long-Term Supported Release with C++11 Compliant Compiler

    Qt Project's Lars Knoll was happy to announce today, May 31, 2017, the release and immediate availability for download of Qt 5.9.0 stable and long-term supported (LTS) series of the open-source and cross-platform application framework.

  • Qt 5.9 LTS Released With Its OpenVG Back-End & Much More

    Lars Knoll has just announced the availability of Qt 5.9. Qt 5.9 has big improvements around performance and stability as noted by Lars, which is good given this series' LTS state. Qt LTS releases are supported for a period of three years.

  • Qt 5.9 released

    I’m happy to let you all know that Qt 5.9.0 has just been released. A lot of work has been put into it, making Qt 5.9 the best Qt version we have developed so far.

Tizen Spreading in Homes

Filed under
Linux

Mutt An Open Source Text Based Email Client For Linux

​Mutt is an email client but with a different approach. It is fully based on the terminal when it comes to work. Mutt is a very simple email client easy to configure and use. It was really awesome to use it and now it is the default email client on my PC. Let us see more about mutt and see how to install mutt on our Linux box.

Read<br />
more

Containers: Cisco, CoreOS, Blocks of Containers, and Kubernetes

Filed under
Server
OSS
  • Cisco Advances OpenStack and Container Networking Efforts

    Cisco is working on multiple efforts to help improve the state of both OpenStack and container networking. In a video interview, Lew Tucker, Vice President and CTO, Cloud Computing, provides insight ino the current and future state of networking for OpenStack and container environments.

  • CoreOS Fleet Fades Away in Favor of Kubernetes and Tectonic

    When container vendor CoreOS first got started, among its primary innovations was the Fleet cluster management system. Now in 2017, Fleet is on its way out, as CoreOS has standardized on Kubernetes as the basis for its commercial aspirations with the Tectonic platform.

    At the core of Fleet is the open-source etcd distributed key-value store that CoreOS developed, which has now also become the cornerstone of Kubernetes. In a 2014 interview with ServerWatch, Brandon Philips, CTO of CoreOS, explained that Fleet was the natural step after developing etcd.

  • Building Blocks of Containers

    This article series previews the new Containers Fundamentals training course from The Linux Foundation, which is designed for those who are new to container technologies. In previous excerpts, we talked about what containers are and what they're not and explained a little of their history. In this last post of the series, we will look at the building blocks for containers, specifically, namespaces, control groups, and UnionFS.

  • The folks who brought you Kubernetes now want to make it easier to use

    Kubernetes is quickly becoming something of a standard for software container orchestration, but in the grand scheme of things, it’s still very much an early adopter’s product. A new open-source project from Heptio and others hopes to change that.

EUPL Becomes GPLv3-compatible, GPL Defended by Courts

Filed under
GNU
Legal
  • European Commission updates EUPL open source licence

    The European Commission has updated the European Union Public Licence (EUPL). Version 1.2 has a wider coverage, making it easier to use the licence to publish data, documents, technical specifications and standards, as well as software source code. In addition, the new licence is compatible with a wider range of other free and open source software licences, including the GNU Public Licence v3.

  • 100 Million Reasons For Open Source Compliance

    CoKinetic Systems Corporation filed suit against Panasonic Avionics Corporation, seeking damages in excess of $100 million, in part, for violation of the GPL v2 open source license. CoKinetic alleged that Panasonic blocked competitors from having the ability to develop software for Panasonic’s In-flight Entertainment (IFE) hardware by refusing to distribute the source code for its open-source Linux based operating system. CoKinetic alleged that this software controls the basic functions of Panasonic IFE hardware systems. According to CoKinetic, this is a willful violation of the GPL License, exposing Panasonic as a willful infringer of the copyrights of thousands of software developers that have contributed to Linux. The suit includes other very interesting legal claims, detailed below.

  • Artifex v. Hancom: Open Source is Now an Enforceable Contract

    Today, as much as 50 percent of the code used in all software (including Internet of Things devices) is comprised of open source software. While open source provides a convenient short cut for software developers to be more agile and efficient – there’s also a hidden risk: The law. While open source components are by definition free and available for anyone to use – there are limitations and most open source components have licensing obligations that developers must comply with.

More in Tux Machines

Programming/Development: C++, Go, Mozilla/Firefox and Python

  • Deliverable 1 : [✓]
    Seems okay, far better than the initial results. Although I should say, I deviated from what I thought I would need to write. First I assumed that I don’t have to write another boost::graph wrapper for KisPaintDevice, but I had to. That was one heck of an experience. In one of the last few posts, I ranted on Dmitry’s interpretation of the Graph, turns out we were on the same page but I understood his explanation the wrong way. I should put more attention to details from now on I guess. All the pixels are connected to each other, but they only have an edge between them if they are adjacent. If in center, the out degree would be 8, if in corners, 3 and if in edges, 5. There are some other cases too, but I will leave them for the moment. While writing the wrapper, I also got to know some of the cool features and techniques of C++, which I will be writing posts on as soon as I get some time, concepts, traits, avoiding virtual functions and what not. It is commendable that how boost approaches boost::astar_search, there is not a single virtual function, you don’t have to inherit anything (you can though for safety), just templates and traits, you are done.
  • Go Creeping In
    I’ve seen the inside of the Google and Amazon tech stacks. There are common threads that run through them and also, I bet, through most BigTechCos. Here and there down the stack is a lot of C++ and vestigial remnants from earlier days, Perl or PHP or whatever. Out in front of humans, of course, JS. But in between, there are oceans and oceans of Java; to a remarkable degree, it runs the Internet. Except for, here and there, you find a small but steadily increasing proportion of Go.
  • Stand by for FPR14 SPR1 chemspill
    Mozilla has shipped a fix for MFSA2019-18 in Firefox 67.0.3 and 60.7.1. This exploit has been detected in the wild, and while my analysis indicates it would require a PowerPC-specific attack to be exploitable in official TenFourFox builds (the Intel versions may be directly exploited, however), it could probably cause drive-by crashes and we should therefore ship an urgent fix as well. The chemspill is currently undergoing confidence tests and I'm shooting to release builds before the weekend. For builders, the only change in FPR14 SPR1 is the patch for bug 1544386, which I will be pushing to the repo just as soon as I have confirmed the fix causes no regressions.
  • PyPI Now Supports Two-Factor Login via WebAuthn
  • Understanding Python assignment
  • How to Publish Your Own Python Package to PyPI
  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #373 (June 18, 2019)
  • EuroPython 2019: Community Discounts
  • EuroPython 2019: Inviting European Python Conference Organizers

today's howtos

All Linux, all the time: Supercomputers Top 500

Starting at the top, two IBM-built supercomputers, Summit and Sierra, at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Tennessee and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, respectively to the bottom -- a Lenovo Xeon-powered box in China -- all of them run Linux. Linux supports more hardware architectures than any other operating system. In supercomputers, it supports both clusters, such as Summit and Sierra, the most common architecture, and Massively Parallel Processing (MPP), which is used by the number three computer Sunway TaihuLight. When it comes to high-performance computing (HPC), Intel dominates the TOP500 by providing processing power to 95.6% of all systems included on the list. That said, IBM's POWER powers the fastest supercomputers. One supercomputer works its high-speed magic with Arm processors: Sandia Labs' Astra, an HPE design, which uses over 130-thousand Cavium ThunderX2 cores. And, what do all these processors run? Linux, of course. . 133 systems of the Top 500 supercomputers are using either accelerator or co-processor setups. Of these most are using Nvidia GPUs. And, once more, it's Linux conducting the hardware in a symphony of speed. Read more

Red Hat and SUSE Leftovers

  • Are DevOps certifications valuable? 10 pros and cons
  • Kubernetes 1.15: Enabling the Workloads
    The last mile for any enterprise IT system is the application. In order to enable those applications to function properly, an entire ecosystem of services, APIs, databases and edge servers must exist. As Carl Sagan once said, “If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe.” To create that IT universe, however, we must have control over its elements. In the Kubernetes universe, the individual solar systems and planets are now Operators, and the fundamental laws of that universe have solidified to the point where civilizations can grow and take root. Discarding the metaphor, we can see this in the introduction of Object Count Quota Support For Custom Resources. In English, this enables administrators to count and limit the number of Kubernetes resources across the broader ecosystem in a given cluster. This means services like Knative, Istio, and even Operators like the CrunchyData PostgreSQL Operator, the MongoDB Operator or the Redis Operator can be controlled via quota using the same mechanisms that standard Kubernetes resources have enjoyed for many releases. That’s great for developers, who can now be limited by certain expectations. It would not benefit the cluster for a bad bit of code to create 30 new PostgreSQL clusters because someone forgot to add a “;” at the end of a line. Call them “guardrails” that protect against unbounded object growth in your etcd database.
  • Red Hat named HPE’s Partner of the Year at HPE Discover 2019
    For more than 19 years, Red Hat has collaborated with HPE to develop, deliver and support trusted solutions that can create value and fuel transformation for customers. Our work together has grown over these nearly two decades and our solutions now include Linux, containers and telecommunications technologies, to name just a few. As a testament to our collaboration, HPE has named Red Hat the Technology Partner of the Year 2019 for Hybrid Cloud Solutions.
  • Demystifying Containers – Part II: Container Runtimes
    This series of blog posts and corresponding talks aims to provide you with a pragmatic view on containers from a historic perspective. Together we will discover modern cloud architectures layer by layer, which means we will start at the Linux Kernel level and end up at writing our own secure cloud native applications. Simple examples paired with the historic background will guide you from the beginning with a minimal Linux environment up to crafting secure containers, which fit perfectly into todays’ and futures’ orchestration world. In the end it should be much easier to understand how features within the Linux kernel, container tools, runtimes, software defined networks and orchestration software like Kubernetes are designed and how they work under the hood.
  • Edge > Core > Cloud: Transform the Way You Want
    For more than 25 years, SUSE has been very successful in delivering enterprise-grade Linux to our customers. And as IT infrastructure has shifted and evolved, so have we. For instance, we enabled and supported the move to software-defined data centers as virtualization and containerization technologies became more prevalent and data growth demanded a new approach.
  • SUSE OpenStack Cloud Technology Preview Takes Flight
    We are pleased to announce that as of today we are making a technology preview of a containerized version of SUSE OpenStack Cloud available that will demonstrate a future direction for our product. The lifecycle management for this technology preview is based on an upstream OpenStack project called Airship, which SUSE has been using and contributing to for some time. This follows our open / open policy of upstream first and community involvement.