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May 2017

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

An Early Look At Debian 9.0 Performance vs. Debian 8.8, Ubuntu 17.04, CentOS 7, Clear Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Debian

Debian 9.0 has settled on the Linux 4.9 kernel, GNOME Shell 3.22 desktop by default, X.Org Server 1.19.2, Mesa 13.0.6 (yes, sadly not Mesa 17.0 or 17.1), GCC 6.3.0 and is using an EXT4 file-system by default. With Debian 9 is also the switch from ACPI CPUFreq to P-State for CPU frequency scaling on newer Intel hardware, which is why the CPU frequency of this Skylake test system is reflected differently between them on the system table.

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Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Tech pro cautions on attribution of cyber attacks
  • Cyber crime to cost business US$8 trillion: Juniper

    The report, by Juniper Research, also forecasts that the number of personal data records stolen by cyber criminals will reach 2.8 billion in 2017, and almost double to 5 billion in 2020.

  • Russian Hackers Are Using Google’s Own Infrastructure to Hack Gmail Users

    The “Change Password” button linked to a short URL from the Tiny.cc link shortener service, a Bitly competitor. But the hackers cleverly disguised it as a legitimate link by using Google’s Accelerated Mobile Pages, or AMP. This is a service hosted by the internet giant that was originally designed to speed up web pages on mobile, especially for publishers. In practice, it works by creating a copy of a website’s page on Google’s servers, but it also acts as an open redirect.

  • The sudo tty bug and procps
  • Improving Linux Security with DevSecOps

    Ask people who run IT departments these days what keeps them up at night, and they'll probably tell you it's security—or the lack of it. With the explosive growth of malicious attacks on everything from hospitals to Fortune 500s, security—not hardware, software and even staff—is what currently makes life miserable.

    That's why organizations of all sizes are looking to change fundamentally how they do security. It's no longer a single team's job to make sure systems are secure and internal auditing is good enough to identify and mitigate attacks. Today, everyone is responsible for security, which is the guiding principal of DevSecOps.

    Just as in DevOps, which aims to speed the development of software by improving collaboration and balancing the competing interests of operations teams and developers, DevSecOps seeks to get everyone thinking about security together and up front. Trying to bake in security after systems are built and code is deployed is simply too late.

21-Way NVIDIA Fermi/Kepler/Maxwell/Pascal OpenCL GPU Comparison

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

    The tested GPUs included the:

    MSI NVIDIA GeForce GTX 460 768MB
    eVGA NVIDIA GeForce GT 520 1024MB
    Zotac NVIDIA GeForce GT 610 1024MB
    MSI NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 1024MB
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 680 2048MB
    eVGA NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750 1024MB
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750 Ti 2048MB
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 760 2048MB
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 Ti 3072MB
    eVGA NVIDIA GeForce GTX 950 2048MB
    eVGA NVIDIA GeForce GTX 960 2048MB
    eVGA NVIDIA GeForce GTX 970 4096MB
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 980 4096MB
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 980 Ti 6144MB
    MSI NVIDIA GeForce GT 1030 2048MB
    Zotac NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 2048MB
    eVGA NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Ti 4096MB
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 6GB 6144MB
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 8192MB
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 8192MB
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti 11264MB

    Read more

KDE: Krita, FreeBSD, Cutelyst 1.7.0, and Qt

Filed under
KDE
  • Krita 3.1.4 Open-Source Digital Painting App Improves Loading of GIMP 2.9 Files

    Krita 3.1.4 is here as the latest bugfix and stability release of the popular application, which is loved by amateur and professional digital artists alike, and it's a recommended update for anyone using Krita 3.1.3 or a previous version from the Krita 3.1 series. It has been released for all supported platforms.

  • Moving KDE-FreeBSD ports infrastructure

    We’re updating the documentation (in the KDE Community Wiki), but mostly things will be simpler, and it may make sense to simply checkout /usr/ports from the KDE-FreeBSD ports tree instead of anything else. We’ll continue to call it “Area51”, even if that string doesn’t occur in its name anymore.

  • Cutelyst 1.7.0 released! WebSocket support added.

    WebSocket support is probably a key feature to have on a modern web framework, Perl Catalyst doesn’t look like it wasn’t designed with it in mind, the way I found to do WS there wasn’t intuitive.

  • QProcess Or KProcess ?

    Most of the time of community bonding period was spent giving college exams. By the time my exams got over, I only had a week left to make something useful of the community bonding period time.

  • Qt 5.9 Launches as Long-Term Supported Release with C++11 Compliant Compiler

    Qt Project's Lars Knoll was happy to announce today, May 31, 2017, the release and immediate availability for download of Qt 5.9.0 stable and long-term supported (LTS) series of the open-source and cross-platform application framework.

  • Qt 5.9 LTS Released With Its OpenVG Back-End & Much More

    Lars Knoll has just announced the availability of Qt 5.9. Qt 5.9 has big improvements around performance and stability as noted by Lars, which is good given this series' LTS state. Qt LTS releases are supported for a period of three years.

  • Qt 5.9 released

    I’m happy to let you all know that Qt 5.9.0 has just been released. A lot of work has been put into it, making Qt 5.9 the best Qt version we have developed so far.

Tizen Spreading in Homes

Filed under
Linux

Mutt An Open Source Text Based Email Client For Linux

​Mutt is an email client but with a different approach. It is fully based on the terminal when it comes to work. Mutt is a very simple email client easy to configure and use. It was really awesome to use it and now it is the default email client on my PC. Let us see more about mutt and see how to install mutt on our Linux box.

Read<br />
more

Containers: Cisco, CoreOS, Blocks of Containers, and Kubernetes

Filed under
Server
OSS
  • Cisco Advances OpenStack and Container Networking Efforts

    Cisco is working on multiple efforts to help improve the state of both OpenStack and container networking. In a video interview, Lew Tucker, Vice President and CTO, Cloud Computing, provides insight ino the current and future state of networking for OpenStack and container environments.

  • CoreOS Fleet Fades Away in Favor of Kubernetes and Tectonic

    When container vendor CoreOS first got started, among its primary innovations was the Fleet cluster management system. Now in 2017, Fleet is on its way out, as CoreOS has standardized on Kubernetes as the basis for its commercial aspirations with the Tectonic platform.

    At the core of Fleet is the open-source etcd distributed key-value store that CoreOS developed, which has now also become the cornerstone of Kubernetes. In a 2014 interview with ServerWatch, Brandon Philips, CTO of CoreOS, explained that Fleet was the natural step after developing etcd.

  • Building Blocks of Containers

    This article series previews the new Containers Fundamentals training course from The Linux Foundation, which is designed for those who are new to container technologies. In previous excerpts, we talked about what containers are and what they're not and explained a little of their history. In this last post of the series, we will look at the building blocks for containers, specifically, namespaces, control groups, and UnionFS.

  • The folks who brought you Kubernetes now want to make it easier to use

    Kubernetes is quickly becoming something of a standard for software container orchestration, but in the grand scheme of things, it’s still very much an early adopter’s product. A new open-source project from Heptio and others hopes to change that.

EUPL Becomes GPLv3-compatible, GPL Defended by Courts

Filed under
GNU
Legal
  • European Commission updates EUPL open source licence

    The European Commission has updated the European Union Public Licence (EUPL). Version 1.2 has a wider coverage, making it easier to use the licence to publish data, documents, technical specifications and standards, as well as software source code. In addition, the new licence is compatible with a wider range of other free and open source software licences, including the GNU Public Licence v3.

  • 100 Million Reasons For Open Source Compliance

    CoKinetic Systems Corporation filed suit against Panasonic Avionics Corporation, seeking damages in excess of $100 million, in part, for violation of the GPL v2 open source license. CoKinetic alleged that Panasonic blocked competitors from having the ability to develop software for Panasonic’s In-flight Entertainment (IFE) hardware by refusing to distribute the source code for its open-source Linux based operating system. CoKinetic alleged that this software controls the basic functions of Panasonic IFE hardware systems. According to CoKinetic, this is a willful violation of the GPL License, exposing Panasonic as a willful infringer of the copyrights of thousands of software developers that have contributed to Linux. The suit includes other very interesting legal claims, detailed below.

  • Artifex v. Hancom: Open Source is Now an Enforceable Contract

    Today, as much as 50 percent of the code used in all software (including Internet of Things devices) is comprised of open source software. While open source provides a convenient short cut for software developers to be more agile and efficient – there’s also a hidden risk: The law. While open source components are by definition free and available for anyone to use – there are limitations and most open source components have licensing obligations that developers must comply with.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

10 Things to do After Installing Linux Mint 20

Here is a curated list of items that you should try after installing Linux Mint 20 Ulyana. Read more

today's leftovers (Red Hat Picks and Security Mostly)

           
  • WordPress 5.5 Beta 1

    WordPress 5.5 Beta 1 is now available for testing! This software is still in development, so it’s not recommended to run this version on a production site. Consider setting up a test site to play with the new version. [...] Keep your eyes on the Make WordPress Core blog for 5.5-related developer notes in the coming weeks, breaking down these and other changes in greater detail. So far, contributors have fixed more than 350 tickets in WordPress 5.5, including 155 new features and enhancements, and more bug fixes are on the way.

  • Security updates for Tuesday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (php7.3), Fedora (gst), Mageia (libvirt, mariadb, pdns-recursor, and ruby), openSUSE (chocolate-doom, coturn, kernel, live555, ntp, python3, and rust, rust-cbindgen), Oracle (virt:ol), Red Hat (file, firefox, gettext, kdelibs, kernel, kernel-alt, microcode_ctl, nghttp2, nodejs:10, nodejs:12, php, qemu-kvm, ruby, and tomcat), SUSE (libjpeg-turbo, mozilla-nspr, mozilla-nss, mozilla-nss, nasm, openldap2, and permissions), and Ubuntu (coturn, glibc, nss, and openexr).

  • Lawsuit & Bi-Partisan Group Of Senators Seek To Push Back On Trump Administration's Attempt To Corrupt The Open Technology Fund

    Last month we wrote about how the newly appointed head of the US Agency for Global Media (USAGM) had cleaned house, getting rid of the heads of the various organizations under the USAGM umbrella. That included Voice of America, Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Radio Free Asia, Middle East Broadcasting... and the Open Technology Fund. The general story making the rounds is that Pack, a Steve Bannon acolyte, planned to turn the famously independent media operations into a propaganda arm for the Trump administration. Leaving side the concerns about why this is so dangerous and problematic on the media side, we focused mostly on the one "different" organization under the USAGM banner: the Open Technology Fund.

  • EFF Joins Coalition Calling On the EU to Introduce Interoperability Rules

    Today, EFF sent a joint letter to European Commission Executive Vice President Margrethe Vestager, highlighting the enormous potential of interoperability to help achieve the EU’s goals for Europe’s digital future. EFF joins a strong coalition of organizations representing European civil society organizations, entrepreneurs, and SMEs. We are calling on the European Commission to consider the role interoperability can play in ensuring that technology creates a fair and competitive economy and strengthens an open, democratic, and sustainable society. Specifically, we urge the Commission to include specific measures requiring interoperability of large Internet platforms in the forthcoming Digital Services Act package. This will strengthen user empowerment and competition in the European digital single market.

    Interoperability mandates will enable users to exercise greater control over their online experiences. No longer confronted with the binary choice of either staying on dominant platforms that do not serve their needs or losing access to their social network, users will be able to choose freely the tools that best respect their privacy, security, or accessibility preferences. Interoperability rules will also be crucial to ensure a dynamic market in which new entrants and innovative business models will have a fair shot to convince users of their value.

  • How not to treat a customer

    First, my complaint to Simply NUC about the recent comedy of errors around my attempt to order a replacement fan for Cathy’s NUC. 

  • Kafka Monthly Digest – May 2020
  • Kafka Monthly Digest – June 2020

    In this 29th edition of the Kafka Monthly Digest, I’ll cover what happened in the Apache Kafka community in June 2020.

  • Introduction to Watson AutoAI

    AutoML is a current buzzword that appears in a lot in tech industry articles and research, and is a product offering in many vendor product catalogs. It’s also one of the topics that I get asked about, such as “How to approach AutoML products”, “Will these products perform all of the steps of the machine learning lifecycle while giving me as a data scientist some control over the parameters?”

  • Red Hat Learning Subscription News Flash 5: First look at Red Hat Remote Certification Exams
  • Mike Blumenkrantz: Testing Accidents

    Armed with a colossal set of patches in my zink-wip branch and feeling again like maybe it was time to be a team player instead of charging off down the field on my own, I decided yesterday morning to check out Erik’s MR to enable ARB_depth_clamp that’s been blocked on a failing piglit test for several weeks. The extension was working, supposedly, and all this MR does is enable it for use, so how hard could this be?

KDE and LibreOffice GSoC

  • Week 4 and 5: GSoC Project Report

    This is the report for week 4 and week 5 combined into one because I couldn’t do much during week 4 due to college tests and assignments, so there was not much to report for that week. These two weeks I worked on implementing interactions between the the storyboard docker and timeline docker (or the new Animation Timeline docker). Most of the interactions from the timeline docker to the storyboard docker are implemented.

  • Cantor - Plots handling improvments

    this is the third post about the progress in my GSoC project and I want to present new changes in the handling of the external packages in Cantor. The biggest changes done recently happened for Python. We now properly support integrated plots created with matplotlib. Cantor intercepts the creation of plots and embedds the result into its worksheet. This also works if multiple plots are created in one step the order of plots is preserved. Also, text results between plots are also supported.

  • Google Summer of Code 2020 - Week 4

    According to my GSoC proposal, I should be done with the general purpose graph layout capabilities for Rocs and free to start working on layout algorithms specifically designed to draw trees. This is not the case for a series of reasons, including my decision to write my own implementation of a general purpose force-based graph layout algorithm and failure to anticipate the need for non-functional tests to evaluate the quality of the layouts. I still need to document the functionalities of the plugin and improve the code documentation as well. Besides that, although it is not present in my original purpose, I really want to include the layout algorithm presented in [1], because I have high expectations about the quality of the layouts it can produce. [...] By taking advantage of the properties of trees, even simple solutions such as my one-day experimental implementation can guarantee some desirable layout properties that the general purpose force-based layout algorithm can not. For instance, it guarantees that there are no intersections between edges or between nodes. The force-based layout algorithm I implemented can generate layouts with pairs of edges that intersect even when applied to trees.

  • Simulated Animation Effects Week#5

    I’ve started past week by going over my implementation of simulated animation effects and getting rid of the rough parts, so it would be somewhat ready to be merged into LO master. While doing so, realized I’ve forgot to add support for other types of ongoing animations in parallel with a simulated animation. So to implement this, I thought all animation instances would have a reference to box2DWorld, if box2DWorld is initiated (as in there’s a simulated animation going on), these animations would supply box2DWorld with required information on how to update shape corresponding to this animation instance. The information supplied would have the uno shape reference of that animation effect, type of the update box2DWorld will perform (change position, appear/disappear, change size etc.), and if required any additional info (for instance, if it is an path motion animation, it would supply the updated position of the shape).